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Full text of "The Game breeder"

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HARVARD UNIVERSITY 




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LIBRARY 



OF THE 



Museum of Comparative Zoology 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/gamebreeder1419181919hunt 



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OCTOBER, 1918 ^i ' ' ' PRICE TEN CENTS 

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The 







GAMBEL'S QUAIL EGGS FROM THE LONG ISLAND (N. Y.) GAME BREEDERS ASSOCIATION 

Gambel's Quail Eggs Were Successfully Hatched in An Incubator and the Young Birds 
Were Given to Quails Similar to Those on the Back Cover of the Magazine. Cock Bob- 
Whites Adopted the Young Gambels and Reared Them. Bantams also Reared Broods 

of Gambels 

Published Monthly. Entered as second-class matter July 9, 1915, at the Post Office, New York City, New 

York, under the Act of March 3, 1879 
The Game Conservation Society, Inc., Publishers, New S'ork, N. Y. 



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THE GAME BREEDER 







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He Learned to Hit Em 
at the Gun Club 

Back home he was a trapshooter. At the 
gun club he learned how to hit moving objects, 
ninety times out of a hundred. 

Stopping a hand grenade in mid-air or drop- 
ping a charging Hun is " old stuff " for him. 

At the cantonments and aviation camps in 
the U. S and France regulation 

TRAPSHOOTING 

at clay targets is a recognized part of the training. 
And with enemy trenches a few yards distant the 
bayoneted trench shotgun is proving a most efficient 
weapon of defense or offense. 

Whether for prospective active service or home 
defense you can learn to "shoot and hit" at one of 
the thousand of gun clubs in this country. You 
will be welcomed at any club by good Americans 
who will loan you a gun and teach you how to 
handle it with skill. 

For address of nearest club and Trapshooting In- 
struction Book check trapshooting in the coupon, sign 
your name and mail it now to u 

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THE GAME BREEDER 



OUR WILD FOWL AND WADERS 

THE NEW YORK TIMES 

"The subject is the development of a new crop -a flesh crop which has especial 
timeliness in view of the general exhaustion of our food supply. Mr. Huntington dis- 
cusses in the most practical manner the restoration of this crop of feathered game, 
and from the standpoint both of the sportsman and the market gunner, wild ducks, 
it seems, can be raised as easily and cheaply as domesticated ducks, and with 
equally excellent financial results. The way to do this is described with estimates 
of cost and citation of experience abroad, where the deficiency of food supply has 
led to the discovery and elaboration of many remedies to which we have not yet 
been forced. Mr. Huntington's book is illustrated with photographs, interesting 
alike to naturalists and breeders." 

WILLIAM BREWSTER 

" ' Our Wild Fowl and Waders' is obviously an able, comprehensive and very 
interesting treatise on a subject which has hitherto received but little attention from 
writers, especially in America, and concerning which naturalists, as well as sports- 
men, will, I am sure, be glad to be thus credibly and pleasingly informed." 

THE LOCKPORT UNION-SUN 

" Mr. Huntington has given to the American people an admirable treatise on the 
practical methods of making these splendid and desirable birds profitably plentiful. 
Ponds, streams and waste lands which do not pay the meagre taxes upon them can 
be utilized and be made to yield both handsome profits and good sport. This 
American authority on wild game tells the farmers and land owners of this country 
how to do it." 

CHARLES HALLOCK 

"The wild fowl book is valuable, clearsighted and scholastic. It is a, direct 
appeal to sportsmen of common sense and generous behavior, and they will readily 
absorb its comprehensive pages and act accordingly— and live thereby." 

DR. R. W. SHUFELDT 

" I have enjoyed the treat in my reading of this book from frontispiece to finish 
and I wager anybody else will enjoy it. . . . The author has placed every sports- 
man; every naturalist and a great many other citizens of other callings squarely under 
obligations to him. The book is a direct and logical argument setting forth the 
means for the preservation in the future of our wild fowl and waders. . . . The 
illustrations are judiciously selected, interesting and materially add to the value of 
the volume." 

A. A. HILL 

" This is not only a readable book, but it is important in an economic sense, and 
it will especially appeal to all who are interested in the conservation of wild life, and 
especially our game birds." 

AUTOMOBILE DEALER AND REPAIRER 

" If the advice of Dwight W. Huntington, pioneer and apostle of the movement 
in this country for a rational game protection and conservation, be acted upon, the 
time is coming speedily when game will be as cheap as beef or mutton. At present, 
after fifty years of legal protection, we have no game to amount to anything save in 
the more remote sections. . . . The book is not only instructive in an economic 
sense, showing how to make wild duck preserves safe and attractive, how to get 
stock and eggs and the food required, but is delightful reading for all. The author 
of ' Our Wild Fowl and Waders' is doing a great public service in his campaign 
for more game." 

OUR Wild Fowl and Waders. will be sent to any address in the United States 
or Canada with The Game Breeder for one year upon receipt of $2.00. 

THE GAME CONSERVATION SOCIETY 

150 NASSAU STREET, N. Y. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



THE GAME BREEDER 




Quail, Bobwhites and Other Species 

NOW IS THE TIME TO BUY QUAIL FROM 

Mac ken sen Game Park 

I carry the largest stock in America of live 
game birds, ornamental birds and quadrupeds. 

Also Pheasant Eggs by the 1 00 & 1 000 

I am prepared to fill the largest orders for Pheasants 
and Eggs, and for years I have filled practically all of 
the large State orders for both Partridges and Pheasants. 

AH Pheasant Eggs Are from My Own Pens 

Pheasants 

My Pheasant pens hold thousands of 
Pheasants and I am prepared to furnish 
these birds in large numbers to State de- 
partments, individual breeders and preserves. 

Wild Duck 

Mallards, Black Duck, Teal, Wood-Duck, Pintails and other species 

can be supplied in large numbers at at- 
tractive prices. Also Mandarins and all 
other water fowl. 

Now is the Time to Buy Wild Turkey Eggs 

AND 

Wild Turkeys 

I am now the largest breeder and 
dealer in Wild Turkeys and can supply 
these birds in good numbers to State 
Departments and preserve owners. 

I carry the largest stock in America of ornamental birds and animals. My ponds now contain nearly 200 best 
Royal Swans of England I have tine lot of the beautiful pink FLAMINGOES and the very large European 
PELICANS. Also STORKS, CRANES, PEAFOWL, fancy GEESE and DUCKS. My pheasant pens contain over 
a thousand Ringneck and fancy PHEASANTS. All stock is kept under practically natural conditions. I have 60 acres 
of land entirely devoted to my business. Can also promptly furnish BUFFALOES, DEER, LLAMAS, RABBITS, etc. 

Orders booked during summer. 

I have for years filled, practically all the large State Orders and have better 
facilities for handling large orders than any other firm. 

Write me before buying elsewhere — it will pay yon to do so. Your visit solicited. 
I am only 60 miles from New York and 30 miles from Philadelohia 




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Department V. 



WM. J. MACKENSEN 

YARDLEY, BUCKS COUNTY, PA. 

Member of The Game Guild 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Gam«." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



> .H { l h J I 1 '--Jjy <■'-- V 77 ^ 



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Eventually you will shoot the PARKER. Why not rAKHICK tSKVJS* 

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Survey of the Field 
Game Farms 

Gambel's Partridge 



CONTENTS 



Pheasants and Breeding - 

Notes from The Game Farms and Preserves 

Editorials— The Soft Pedal— Otherwise Than By Shooting 



Hon. Theodore Roualt, Jr., 
State Game Warden for New Mexico 

Daniel Giraud Elliott 
from Game Birds of North America 

By a Reader, with Comment 



THREE THOUSAND 



Chinese-Mongolian Ringneck Pheasants 



FALL DELIVERY 



Full Wing, Healthy, Hardy Birds 

Reeves, Lady Amherst, Golden, 
Silver, Pure Mongolian 

Japanese Silkies, Buff Cochin Bantams 

New Zealand Red Rabbits, Breeding Stock $3.50 Each, Young $2 

We are Breeders Exclusively, and nothing leaves our 
farm that is not right in every particular. 



MARMOT PHEASANTRY 

Member of The Game Guild 
MARMOT, OREGON 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game.' 



T he Game Breeder 



VOLUME XIV 



OCTOBER, I9J8 
Co} 
SURVEY OF THE FIELD. 



NUMBER J 



Fisheries Society Meeting. 

The annual meeting of the American 
Fisheries Society, held at the Waldorf- 
Astoria Hotel, New York, was well at- 
tended. Many people, skilled in the 
propagation of fish, listened for three 
days to the reading of papers on various 
subjects connected with the industry and 
discussed the problems advanced by the 
writers. 

The Effect of Oils on Brook Trout. 

Mr. Adrian Thomas, of Virginia, read 
a paper on the effect of certain oils, tars 
and creosote on the fish. He claimed 
that the automobile is responsible for 
some of the depreciation of trout.. The 
good roads made by macadamizing pre- 
vented the rain water from soaking into 
the ground and the oil and creosote are 
washed into the adjacent streams, kill- 
ing the fish or driving them away. 

Experiments had proved that tar is 
very toxic when drained from the roads. 
Water-gas tar killed fish in thirty hours 
and coal tar in twenty hours. The sul- 
phite liquor which flows from paper 
mills drives fish from streams. 

Important Paper on Pollution. 

Henry B. Ward read a paper on the 
"Elimination of Stream Pollution in 
New York State." The greatest menace 
to the fresh water industry, Mr. Ward 
said, is the poisoning of streams by city 
sewage and the drainage from manufac- 
turing plants.. The greatest loss is oc- 
casioned by the destruction of fish foods 
by the poisons in the water. 

The Conservation Commissioner of 
Wisconsin, Dr. W. E. Barber, said a 
system of filtering on some of the 
streams in his State had been found to 



work well. Mr. Geo. Pratt, the Com- 
missioner for New Pork, said a confer- 
ence recently had been held with lead- 
ing manufacturers to consider plans for 
purification of the streams. For some 
years it has been almost impossible to 
find shad on their spawning grounds be- 
cause the waters are .polluted. 

The high price of fish in the markets 
was discussed, and some favored a Fed- 
eral investigation. The work of propa- 
gation appeared to be offset by those who 
control the fish markets and put up the 
prices. 

Mr. Carlos Avery, of Minnesota, de- 
scribed how his State had gone into the 
fish business in order to aid the Federal 
Food Administration, and said an ample 
supply of fish had been provided for the 
people at from one-half to two-thirds 
the prices previously charged by fish 
dealers. Dr. Barber, of Wisconsin, said 
a similar handling of the fish in his State 
had produced equally good results. 

Meeting of the State Game Officers. 

The meeting of the Fisheries Society 
was followed by a meeting of the State 
game officers at the same hotel. Mr. 
Alexander, the Louisiana Commissioner, 
presided, and Mr. Carlos Avery, of Min- 
nesota, was at the Secretary's desk. 

Comparing the two meetings it was 
observed that the meeting of the Fish- 
eries Society, which included some State 
game and fish commissioners, was much 
better attended than the meeting of the 
game officers was. This was undoubtedly 
due to the fact that many scientific per- 
sons interested in the propagation of fish 
met with the State officers and the meet- 
ing had a decided educational value. 

Meetings of the State game officers 



6 



THE GAME BREEDER 



usually have been attended only by the 
officers and one or two game law enthu- 
siasts who never have seemed to notice 
that as the number of laws was increased 
the number of game birds diminished. 
There was nothing of scientific impor- 
tance, nothing about game production 
which would be likely to attract men of 
ability to the meetings, except of course 
those whose duty it is to execute the 
game laws. 

This year there was considerable in- 
terest in game breeding, and a resolution 
was adopted providing that all States 
which had not done so should amend 
their laws so as to encourage game farm- 
ing, as advocated' by The Game Breeder. 

Professor Pearson, Secretary of the 
Audubon Association, read a report of 
his investigation of the damage done by 
pelicans in the Pelican State and in 
Texas and other Gulf States, in which 
he claimed very little damage was done 
by these birds. 

The papers which interested the few 
people present who are interested in 
game breeding were a paper on the "Im- 
portation of Quail" from Mexico, by Mr. 
Ward, the Kentucky State warden, and a 
paper on "Game Farming" by Mr. 
Roualt, the New Mexico game warden, 
which is printed on another page. 

There was much discussion about the 
numerous regulations under the migra- 
tory bird law, and many State officers 
evidently were trying to discover how it 
would affect the people of their States 
where there was a conflict between new 
regulations made by the committee which 
now provides game laws for the U. S. 
Biological Survey, and the State laws. 
Mr. Adams, of Massachusetts, pointed 
out the difference in the open season for 
'wood-cock and wished to know how the 
State law was affected by the U. ,S. reg- 
ulation. The chief of the new United 
States forces expressed the opinion that 
the States could do about as they pleased 
within the limits of the long open season 
provided by the national regulation, and 
that in case of the wood-cock the United 
States was perfectly willing to have it 
shot in October in Massachusetts, but 
that the State evidently was not willing. 



or vice versa, we find it impossible to 
keep up with one full set of State game 
laws without trying to master two at a 
time. It is to be hoped the States will 
amend their laws so as to make them 
conform to those of the Biological Sur- 
vey, and that the last named will not 
make so many changes that the States 
cannot keep up with them. ' The United 
States statute has a stabilizing clause 
protecting those who protect game, and 
the simplicity of the law protecting game 
farmers and preserve owners is note- 
worthy. 

We predict that as the State officers 
become interested in the game farming 
and preserving by the people which now 
is encouraged, and in the economic ques- 
tions relating to game as a food supply, 
discussion of these subjects may in the 
future largely replace the discussions 
about shortening the season for a few 
days or for a few years and the reduc- 
tion of the bag from three birds to two, 
etc. We can readily see that vast areas 
will always remain which must be looked 
after by the State, and that to keep any 
game on the lands open to the public 
restrictive laws will be needed, often 
closing the season for terms of years, 
until such time as many farms produce 
abundantly, when we hope there can be 
the same freedom in America as there is 
in all other civilized countries, and that 
all who shoot on public lands and 
waters will own the game after they 
shoot it. 

Enthusiasm for Prohibition. 

We were amused at the enthusiasm 
of a man from Pennsylvania who, wav- 
ing a paper in the air containing a list 
of the counties in his State, claimed they 
had just secured the prohibition of 
ruffed grouse shooting in every county 
for a period of two years. We can 
imagine the delight of the Pennsylvania 
foxes, hawks, crows, and snakes, could 
they only hear and understand the result 
of efficient protective game laws. We 
look forward to shooting ruffed grouse 
with the quail next November on popu- 
lous Long. Island, N. Y., and we are glad 
to know that anvone who wishes to try 



THE GAME BREEDER 



the shooting can be sure of bagging both 
birds. We believe the Pennsylvania 
woods are more suitable ■ for ruffed 
grouse than the oak barrens of Long 
Island are, and we are quite sure when 
a few clubs in each county look after 
the birds properly, as they do on Long- 
Island, all hands can shoot in Pennsyl- 
vania. Rest periods often are renewed 
for terms of years, as in the case of the 
quail of New York, outside of Long 
Island, and there is good reason to pre- 
sume that the season may be closed for- 
ever, as it has been in Ohio, provided all 
wish to destroy and none be permitted 
to create. 



A Gamebreeding Policy. 

Often we have pointed out that the 
production of game on the farms which 
are now posted should be encouraged and 
not prevented by game laws. The state 
game departments, as we have repeatedly 
said, should be of great economic im- 
portance to all of the people. If they 
can induce sportsmen to form game- 
shooting clubs and to make proper ar- 
rangements with the owners of the farms 
which have been closed to sport forever 
the result undoubtedly will be more game 
on the vast areas of land and water 
where anyone can shoot without fear of 
being arrested for trespass. When game 
is bred abundantly on places where the 
shooting is lively, it is quite evident that 
much of it will be found outside of the 
preserved area. A man in New York 
who was much prejudiced against game 
breeding told the writer that he had shot 
thirty pheasants outside of the fence 
surrounding a preserved area in which 
we are interested the first season, and 
that he had never shot or seen a pheasant 
before our birds were introduced. He 
added that there were more quail for 
miles on both sides of the railway, on 
land where anyone could shoot, than he 
had ever seen before. Wild ducks were 
shot in the neighborhood and we had 
records of many being shot miles away 
from the point where they were bred. 
Some were reported nearly as far south 
as Florida. 



If some of the numerous small ponds 
where no wild ducks breed today can be 
made to yield thousands of ducks it is 
quite evident that the shooting on the 
larger ponds, lakes and bays which are 
and should be open to the public, will be 
much improved. 

Where many guns combine to become 
producers they shoot on places where 
game has been introduced and always is 
plentiful and by so doing the number of 
guns on public lands and waters is re- 
duced. It is evident that the shooting- 
area is much enlarged since much shoot- 
ing is done on places where there was no 
game and on farms closed to sport by 
their owners. 

Sport has nothing to fear from game 
breeding! 

Crow Contests. 

Crow shooting contests have been sug- 
gested. In places where the farmers 
have been led to believe that the crow is 
highly beneficial they may be unwilling 
to let such contests go on. 

However, there should be enough 
places, where the farmers have seen the 
crows in the corn and the poultry yard, 
to make crow contests possible. When 
crows are protected by laws all that we 
ask is "Keep the crow laws off the 
farms,''' where game always is plentiful 
for sport or for profit. 

Our idea that game laws should be 
kept off the game farms is expressed to 
our liking in section 12 of the Migratory 
Bird Law. We think it would pay to 
have section 12 in mind always when 
new game laws are constructed. A short 
form of expressing the idea is : "This 
act does not apply to game on game 
ranches, farms or preserves where game 
is properly looked after and kept abun- 
dant in order to increase our food 
supply." 

An Important Section. 

The importance of the new section 12 
in the Migratory Bird Law, giving pro- 
tection to game farms and preserves, was 
evident a few minutes after the law was 



THE GAME BREEDER 




DWIGHT W. HUNTINGTON, 2nd. 
Somewhere in France 

signed. A regulation was at. once made 
providing that there should be no shoot- 
ing. In the absence of section 12 this 
section might have been executed . and 
people who produced ducks in order to 
increase the food supply might have been 
arrested because they did not put salt 
on the tails of their ducks in order to 
catch them and execute them with a 
hatchet. 

Our readers now can understand why 
we opposed a law permitting the making 
of regulations until we knew what the 
regulations were to be. The objection 
to an amendment providing that no regu- 
lations preventing game farming and pre- 
serving could be made, tended to make 
us more certain that we were right in 
trying to defeat the law or to hold it 
up until it Was repaired so as to protect 
game preservers who wished to increase 
the food supply. The regulation re- 
quiring the hatchet is in violation of the 
law and void. 




Revised for Ruffed Grouse. 

To be or not to be ; that's the ques- 
tionnaire. 



Lt. (J. G.) JOHN C. HUNTINGTON 
Somewhere at Sea 

Our Secretary. 

John C. Huntington, Secretary of the 
Game Conservation Society, has recently 
been promoted to be a lieutenant in the 
navy. He entered the service at once 
when war was declared and was pro- 
moted to petty officer, ensign and our 
readers will be glad to learn he has just 
gone a step higher. The navy has done a 
wonderful work in putting over a million 
soldiers safely across the ocean. Every 
one feared there must be severe losses of 
troops due to the submarines, but the 
navy seems to have made them stay below 
when American troops are convoyed. 

Dwight W. Huntington, 2nd. 

Dwight W. Huntington, 2nd, of the 
The Game Breeder's staff, enlisted when 
war was declared and now is serving in 
France. In a recent letter, he says : "It 
sounds like a noisy, insane Fourth of 
July. A German, flying low in a plane 
of the type used by the French, sailed up 
to an observation balloon and destroyed 
it Three Allied planes up in the clouds 
heard the shooting and swiftly pounced 
on the German. There was a rattle of 
guns and Fritz,'' the writer says, "went 
into a scrap heap with his machine." 






THE GAME BREEDER 



GAME FARMS. 

By Hon. Theodore Roualt, Jr., 
State Game Warden for New Mexico. 

A Paper read at the recent convention of State Game Commissioners 






The subject, "Game Farms," is so 
broad that one can hardly do it justice 
in a brief article. However, I have 
made an effort to be not only brief but 
to the point. At the beginning I may 
also explain that this covers conditions 
pretty much as found in the Southwest 
and particularly my own State. There- 
fore the proper title should be '"A Game 
Ranch in New Mexico." 

This being a "Win the War" conven- 
tion of this Association, I believe it is 
most appropriate that the subject of 
game farms be diligently discussed in an 
effort to find ways and means by which 
game farming may be better utilized in 
helping out with the food supply. I 
consider this a most opportune time to 
engage in this work. Have any of you 
given the subject of game farms thought 
in connection with our injured boys re- 
turning from the battlefields in France ? 
To many of these boys this work will 
not only be most helpful, pleasant and 
interesting, but also most profitable. A 
great number of these chaps probably 
have had former experience in private 
game preserves, and the game farm 
would naturally appeal to them. This, 
too, Would be one more way for him to 
help "win the war" and at the same time 
bring him a most liberal income. 

I just noticed an advertisement in the 
corner of the hotel reading "Reclama- 
tion Is Conservation." I therefore 
would favor this International Associa- 
tion of Game Commissioners going on 
record as urging Congressional action 
toward the granting, under favorable 
conditions, of suitable tracts of land for 
game farming to any of our soldiers 
who have seen service abroad and who 
may desire to enter this work. There 
are countless thousands of acres through- 
out the United States, and particularly 
in the West, admirably adapted to the 



purpose, but worthless for anything else. 
The reclamation of these lands by game 
farms spells Conservation. It would be 
only a short time until game and wild 
fowl would be as plentiful on the mar- 
kets as in former years ; and, at the same 
time, help materially in conserving our 
beef supply. 

Have any of you given thought to the 
drain on our cattle resources brought on 
by this war? Probably not, unless you 
are a cattle man or happen to be from 
the Southwest, where cattle are run in 
large herds. Only ten days ago, in talk- 
ing to a friend of mine, I asked how 
many cattle his range could stand. He 
replied, "Fifty thousand." I asked him 
how many he usually had on his stock 
range. He replied, "From twenty-five 
to thirty thousand, but that now he only 
had about twelve thousand, as this war 
had made it impossible for him to buy 
cattle or keep what he had." Think of 
it, gentlemen ! Only 22 per cent, of what 
his range can stand, and grass knee high 
all over his three hundred and fifty 
thousand acres of land ! 

In some manner we must make up for 
this wastage and, in my opinion, the 
solution of the problem is game farming. 

Up to eighteen years ago, out of Santa 
Fe, New Mexico, there were a number 
of professional hunters who weekly 
made trips into town with pack- burros, 
loaded down with venison, turkey, elk, 
antelope and bear meat. This was sold 
by the butcher just as beef or pork are 
sold today, excepting that the price was 
about one-fourth or less than what we 
are paying today for our ordinary cuts 
of meat. Before the Federal and State 
laws were enacted and the sale of game 
was still considered legal, I have seen 
quail sold at 50 cents per dozen, dead or 
alive ; rabbits, two for 5 cents ; ducks, 
10 cents ; brant, geese and cranes at 50 



10 



THE GAME BREEDER 



cents a piece. Today you can get 
75 cents each for all the quail you can 
deliver. I say 75 cents well advisedly, 
for I am getting 83 cents per bird for 
all the Gambel and Scaled quail I can 
spare. During the season 1917-18 we 
shipped about two thousand quail out of 
five thousand trapped. These were all 
sold at 50 cents per bird to breeders in 
the Northern States, and they were beg- 
ging for more at this price. This, of 
course, is only one instance. Now there 
are your pheasants bringing from $2.50 
to $5 per bird, your wild ducks, geese 
and turkey proportionately high, and the 
constant demand from private preserves 
for breeding stock and from game deal- 
ers for the culls. 

A beginner in game farming should 
not worry as to the market, but, on the 
contrary, he should do considerable 
worrying as to his start in the business. 
Before taking any step whatsoever, even 
before purchasing land for a game farm, 
I would first obtain information and ad- 
vice from all possible sources ; that is, 
from professional game breeders, pri- 
vate game preserve owners, game com- 
missioners, the U. S. Biological Survey 
and the game farm at Cornell Univer- 
sity. Much valuable information might 
also be had by applying to such men as 
T. Gilbert Pearson, E. A. Quarles, Car- 
los Avery, Dwight Huntington, John B. 
Burnham, Dr. Palmer, Dr. Hornadyand 
many other authorities. I consider 
Quarles on "Pheasants" and Job on 
"Propagation of Wild Birds" the two 
best books published on these subjects', 
and no beginner should be without them. 
The acreage required for a game farm 
depends to a great extent upon a man's 
pocketbook and his ability to carry on 
the work. Were I starting I would en- 
deavor to secure a tract of cheap wild 
land from fifty to one hundred acres, 
with some timber and undergrowth, and, 
if possible, bordering a stream, as shade, 
water and cover are absolutely indis- 
pensable to a game farm. Of this acre- 
age I would use a portion to raise grain 
and alfalfa — the balance to be utilized 
for pens and run-ways. 
* Please understand that I have entered 



into these details presuming, of course, 
that we are endeavoring to induce men 
to take up commercial game farming and 
that the prospective game farmer first 
wants to know where he may readily 
obtain the practical and technical infor- 
mation in order that he might make 
a proper start. In my opinion, the suc- 
cess or failure of such an enterprise may 
be made at the very outset, and in order 
that this work may be started and car- 
ried on successfully too much stress 
cannot be given to the fact that the be- 
ginner must obtain the best possible 
advice as to the manner of procedure 
and the species he should endeavor to 
breed and propagate. 

It might interest you all to know how 
I have handled the pheasants purchased 
by my State. There were several hun- 
dred of these birds purchased during the 
past year. These were distributed 
among a large number of reliable farm- 
ers at no expense to them except the 
erection of proper pens and coops, with 
a distinct understanding that all birds 
raised would be sold to the State when 
two to three months old at the prevail- 
ing market price ; the original birds 
given out remaining the property of the 
State with the understanding that they 
may be called for if any fault is found 
or upon failure of the farmer to carry 
out his agreement — a contract to this 
effect having been signed. The plan now 
seems to be working out very well and 
we have already liberated quite a num- 
ber of birds, hatched and raised in our 
own State. 

As for Gambel and Scaled quail, they 
are a pest in the farming sections. Last 
spring they destroyed several hundred 
acres of young beans in the Rio Grande 
Valley. They will not bother with any 
other greenstuffs if . there are beans 
sprouting out of the ground. Beans 
appear to be their favorite delicacy. 

Wild ducks are reported very plentiful 
from all over the State this season. The 
Bartlett people estimate over 3,500 wild 
turkeys on their ranch of 300,000 acres. 
We estimate as many more in the 
Apache Indian Reservation and sur- 
i\ unding country ; on account of the 



THE GAME BREEDER 



11 



large area and the wilderness and rough- 
ness of our mountains, it is hard to esti- 
mate the number in the State. 

Grouse are reported very plentiful this 
year and seem to be holding their own. 

Prairie chickens have been very 
numerous in eastern New Mexico and 
have done considerable damage to the 
grain crops raised by the dry farmers 
in that portion of the State. All kinds 
of geese and ducks are very abundant. 
' This information is being given for 



the benefit of any of the game commis- 
sioners present who may be interested 
in obtaining specimens or breeding stock 
of any of these birds. I shall be very 
pleased to hear from them and to either 
sell outright or exchange. 

I might also add that in a few days 
there will be given out for publication 
a comprehensive article dealing with this 
subject, giving costs, etc., with particular 
reference to conditions as they obtain in 
New Mexico. 




!.'.t;,*ty 



,0.wi,v. £V«)>y<in\. 



Male, Female and Young 



GAMBEL'S PARTRIDGE 

By Daniel Giraud Elliott, F. R. S. E., etc. 

(This article is from the Game Birds of North America. Since the Game Conservation 
Society is attempting to introduce other birds on Long Island, N. Y., where they will be shot 
this season, it will interest our readers no doubt.) — Editor. 



While disputing the palm for beauty 
of dress and gallant appearance with its 
relative, the California partridge, the 
present species possesses all of the same 
disagreeable traits when he is regarded 
in the light of a game bird. In his legs 
does he trust, and the rocky canons and 
hillsides are his delight, and when met 
with at the base of these often lofty and 



steeply ascending cliffs, instead of flying 
as any well-mannered quail would do, 
he runs with all his might, leaping from 
stone to stone, dodging behind one 
boulder after another until he becomes 
a mere speck above one, or disappears 
altogether. The range of this handsome 
bird extends from western Texas, 
through New Mexico and Arizona to 



12 



THE GAME BREEDER 



California, where it meets the Valley 
partridge in San Bernardino County, 
the Colorado desert proving an effective 
barrier to its extension farther west- 
ward. It is also found in southeastern 
Utah, and was introduced at Fort Union 
in northern New Mexico. It also 
crosses our southern border and is a 
resident of northwestern Mexico. 

Any kind of a locality within its dis- 
persion seems to be perfectly satisfac- 
tory to this bird ; whether it be a dry and 
sandy stretch blistering in torrid heat, or 
a place rocky and bare of leafy covering, 
or tracts hidden by the densest and most 
impregnable thickets — they are all the 
same to Gambel's quail. From my ex- 
perience, however, in hunting them, I 
should say if they had any choice of lo- 
cality it lay between dense clumps, mat- 
ted with vines and bristling wih thorns, 
into and through which nothing living 
could penetrate save themselves, or 
mountain sides that ascend in a direct 
line and which are covered with jagged 
stones and slippery boulders, over 
which the light-footed birds pass with- 
out effort, stopping occasionally to look 
down and jeer at the struggling, panting 
mortal below who is striving to conquer 
the ascent, and when the pursuer had ar- 
rived at the summit, the quail, it would 
be discovered, had run to the edge of 
another canon, into which they flew at 
the first appearance of the sportsman, 
and began the ascent from below on the 
opposite side, leaving the hunter gazing 
at them across the great gulf that rolled 
between. If there is another species of- 
game bird more tantalizing and vexa- 
tious in its manners, and more utterly 
lost to all the finer feelings that should 
compel it to conform to the recognized 
rules that govern field sports, I happily 
do not know of it, and have no wish 
to meet with it. if existing. 

This species is dependent upon water, 
never going far away from brook or 
spring, and its presence is a pretty sure 
indication that a supply of the necessary 
fluid is near at hand. Gambel's quail is 
generally very abundant in the localities 
it frequents, and the coveys of trim, gay- 
looking birds are seen daily running 



about chasing insects, dusting themselves 
in the roads or sandy spots, and uttering 
all the while a soft low queet or zuoeet. 
When alarmed, they commence to run, 
following some leader in outstretched 
line, or else in bunches when each looks 
out for himself, dodging behind every 
bush and stone, and generally striving to 
reach some dense thicket, or some rocky 
hillside up which they climb with surpris- 
ing rapidity- It is, at first, almost im- 
possible to make them take wing, and 
they will only fly when compelled to do 
so by their pursuer appearing right among 
them, and then they proceed but a short 
distance before alighting, and commence 
to run again. If the ground permits the 
covey to be followed rapidly and contin- 
uously, and the birds find that running 
is of no avail, they can then be flushed, 
and they fly swiftly, generally on a level 
about six or eight feet above the ground, 
but in a curving direction, not straight 
forward for any distance, and if the 
covey becomes well scattered the birds 
will sometimes lie well and flush singly, 
but this is exceptional, and a state of 
affairs only arrived at by a long, per- 
sistent and fatiguing pursuit. I imagine 
that most of the birds that are obtained 
by the gun are shot upon the ground. 
Very unsportsmanlike, but after one 
learns their tricks and their manners the 
natural feeling of denunciation against 
such a practice that is possessed by all 
lovers of dog and gun, somehow does 
not seem to be so easily aroused in those 
who have followed these birds for food 
or recreation. If, however, the sports- 
man fails to obtain either of these, there 
is one thing he does get without stint — 
exercise. 

Gambel's partridge bears well great 
extremes of temperature and is appar- 
ently quite as comfortable when the 
thermometer indicates 100 degrees in 
the shade, as in the keen, rarified air 
that blows around the mountain tops at 
an elevation of 8,000 or 9,000 feet. 
When the heat is as great as that men- 
tioned above, this species seeks the bot- 
tom of the canons, or the banks of the 
creeks, and keeps in the shade of the 
dense thickets usually found in such sit- 



THE GAME BREEDER 



13 



uations, or, as is frequently the case, 
perches in the trees. This custom is 
habitual to it, for it is quite an arboreal 
bird, taking refuge on the branches of 
trees or bushes if suddenly alarmed, or 
when the members of a flock become 
scattered after having been compelled to 
take wing. The mating season com- 
mences quite early in the spring, say the 
month of April, and the male presents 
a very handsome appearance as with 
erect body, dignified movements, puffed- 
out feathers and trailing, trembling 
wings, he moves sedately before the gaze 
of his shy lady-love. She is a modestly 
attired little body, similar, but still quite 
different in dress to her lord, lacking the 
strongly contrasting colors upon the 
head, and the great black patch on the 
belly. The glossy, jet black, graceful 
plume of many feathers, that decorates 
the head of the male, opening and clos- 
ing, as his frequent changes of feelings 
exert their influence, is in the female re- 
duced to small proportions, and dusky in 
hue. 

The nest is simply a hollow scratched 
out in the soil, sometimes lined with 
grass or leaves, and concealed from view 
by tall grass, or by some overhanging 
bush, or else hidden away amid the 
vegetation that springs up in the dry 
beds of the creeks. In fact any spot that 
will afford the necessary protection and 
concealment is taken advantage of, and 
the eggs removed from the view of pry- 
ing enemies. Doubtless, however, many 
are taken by reptiles such as snakes of 
various kinds, and even the gila mon- 
ster has been known to have made a 
meal on the eggs of this species. The 
usual number found in a nest is from 
twelve to fifteen; and these have a 
ground color varying from a creamy 



'Many of the eggs laid this year at the Game 
Farms of the Long Island Game Breeders' 
Association were marked with brown without 
the purplish bloom as will appear from the 
illustration on the cover of The Game Breeder. 
Since many Gambels and Bob Whites will be 
produced and taken, "not otherwise than by 
shooting" on farms where there was no game, 
we hope many sportsmen will be convinced 
that they can have quail shooting if they wish 
to do so. 



white to a pale buff, irregularly spotted 
and blotched with dark seal, sometimes 
almost blackish, brown, drab or rufous, 
all suffused with a peculiar purplish 
bloom. 1 Occasionally a nest is found 
placed in a tree, or cactus, a few feet 
from the ground, the bird, doubtless, 
having lost the eggs previously laid, had 
sought a more secure refuge from her 
terrestrial foes. The period of incuba- 
tion extends to about four weeks, and 
probably two broods are raised in a sea- 
son. The birds do not seem to have any 
regular time to commence laying, some 
being much later than others, and on this 
account, and the number of broods 
raised, young or halfgrown birds are met 
with nearly throughout the entire sum- 
mer. The pretty little downy chicks 
run as soon as hatched, and soon become 
exceedingly expert in hiding, which they 
are quick to do at the warning chirp of 
the mother, squatting close to the 
ground and remaining absolutely motion- 
less, or crawling under leaves, or any 
shelter that is available. Danger past, at 
a cluck from the anxious mother, who 
all the time has probably been crouching 
near by, watching her brood, the chicks 
gather around her, and are led to a more 
retired and secure locality. When able 
to use their wings and fly with some de- 
gree of freedom, the young take refuge 
in the trees and perch on the branches, 
but as they grow older the one partic- 
ular habit they have inherited prevails 
over all the rest, and their legs are de- 
pended upon for escape more than upon 
any other means at their disposal, and 
they run with considerable swiftness, 
only using the wings as the last resort. 

Gambel's partridge has many enemies, 
foremost among which is man, both 
white and red, who destroys vast num- 
bers both with gun and snares of vari- 
ous ingenuity. Hawks, wolves, foxes, 
and other predatory animals kill num- 
bers, and doubtless many fall a prey to 
rattlesnakes and other reptiles. Still if 
the species only had to combat with its 
natural enemies, it would probably be 
able to maintain itself in undiminished 
numbers, but whenever man, especially 



14 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Caucasian man, takes a hand in destroy- 
ing, the time of diminution and final ex- 
tinction of any wild creature is near at 
hand.- 

This partridge has a number of calls, 
which it utters at various times and on 
especial occasions, some of which are 
very difficult to represent on paper. At 
the commencement of the pairing season 



"Our ornithologists often have predicted and 
deplored the extermination of game in Amer- 
ica often assigning shooting as the cause. It 
is true, as The Game Breeder has said re- 
peatedly, that even a little shooting is an 
additional check to increase which is fatal. 
It is also true that shooting can be made to 
keep the game as plentiful as it ever was. 
The numerous natural enemies referred to by 
the author destroy thousands of birds every 
season. These are the birds the sportsmen 
should shoot and which they safely can shoot 
provided they do not let the snakes and other 
vermin destroy them. By combining to form 
shooting clubs to share the expense of looking 
after the game propeily, birds can be pro- 
duced in a wild state at a small expense per 
gun. Such industry will prevent the putting 
of quail and grouse on the song-bird list. It 
should be encouraged and not prevented on 
the farms now posted against sport. The sale 
of some of the game produced will bring 
down the cost of production and will make 
the people who eat the game friendly to field 
sports and not opposed to them as many now 
are, besides the farmers. — Editor. 



it gives voice to a clear, ringing note, 
usually uttered from some slight emi- 
nence, which has been compared to the 
syllables yuk-kae-ja by Capain Bendire 
and killink by Dr. Coues, each syllable 
distinctly uttered and the last two some- 
what lengthened. These notes strike 
each hearer so differently that it is im- 
possible to write them down and convey 
to each the impression he has received. 
To me the three-syllabled word given 
above more clearly describes the note as 
it was heard by me, but doubtless many 
others would recognize it better by the 
word of two syllables as given by Dr. 
Coues. This note, or cry, is equivalent 
to the bobwhite of our Northern bird. 
The alarm note is well indicated by Cap- 
tain Bendire as craer, craer, frequently 
repeated ; a rasping, harsh sound, in ut- 
tering which many members of a covey 
join. At other times, when disturbed, 
a soft pect, is heard, followed on the 
slightest alarm by a sharp quit, succeeded 
by the pattering of little feet upon the 
dry leaves as the covey hurries away. 
It is a gentle, beautiful little creature, 
and without Gambel's partridge, with all 
its unsportsmanlike ways, many an arid 
and rock-strewn district would be de- 
prived of its chief attraction. 



PHEASANTS AND BREEDING. 



One of our Wisconsin readers says : "I 
have tried an experiment new to me, but 
which probably has been tried before by 
many others. This year I placed on 
four of my farms a coop of young pheas- 
ants of my late hatchings, with a cluck, 
near to the farmhouse and chickens, 
where they had cover and feed, but for 
the first week or ten days I had a little 
chick feed put down close to the coop 
and also kept fresh water constantly for 
the cluck and the birds. The young 
pheasants were, of course, at liberty, but 
the cluck confined in an old-fashioned 
A-shaped coop. I did the same thing 
with four or five of my farmer neigh- 



bors, who have been very much inter- 
ested in game propagation. 

The result up to the present time 
(September 19) is most gratifying, as 
the birds stay very close to the place 
where they were put out. They remain 
in and around the corn fields and stubble 
and exist partly on small grain which 
they pick up and I have had great sport 
watching them making prey on grasshop- 
pers which constitute their main supply 
of food. While I am not of the opinion 
that these birds will become domesti- 
cated, from present indications I should 
say they will remain sufficiently near the 
barnyard this winter to mingle with the 



THE GAME BREEDER 



15 



poultry and share in their feed, and 1 
hope they will nest at least in as domes- 
tic a manner as the average guinea hen. 

Trying the above experiment sug- 
gested itself to me because of several 
pheasant eggs hatching later than the 
others and resulted in turning these 
young birds in with incubated chickens. 
The young pheasants did very well, not- 
withstanding they received the same feed 
as the young chickens and never had one 
bit of egg and other apparently neces- 
sary pheasant morsels. It is to be ad- 
mitted, of course, that they had plenty 
of range and no doubt had sufficient in- 
sect life as a substitute." 

The grasshoppers no doubt were the 
cause of the successful rearing. 

Our readers are aware that in many 
cases young pheasants, permitted to run 
at large with the hen, have been reared 
successfully. Where the young procure 
plenty of grasshoppers and have a safe 
range this method always has- found to 
work out very well. The hen and chicks 
are shut up for the night until the birds 
are big enough to go to roost. 

Owen Jones, a talented English game- 
keeper and author, says: "When five or 



six weeks old, chicks, hens and coops 
are carted away in wagons to the woods, 
where the chicks must face the dangers 
of vermin by night as well as by day 
until they learn to go to roost." 

In America, of course, where the 
fields and woods are full of vermin, it 
is a difficult matter to introduce pheas- 
ants to the covers as they safely can do 
in countries where the vermin is con- 
trolled by many keepers not only on the 
place where the pheasants are put out in 
the woods, as Mr. Jones describes, but 
also on the adjoining places. Vermin is 
known to gather in places where game is 
reared. After a light snow the fox 
tracks were as numerous as sheep tracks 
would have been had we been keeping 
big flocks of sheep in the fields near the 
pheasant pens at the Game Breeders' As- 
sociation preserve. Hawks, crows and 
black snakes also appeared in good num- 
bers and many were killed and trapped. 
But I am sure had we attempted to es- 
tablish the pheasants in rides in the 
woods the losses would have been large. 
Many of our. quail left the ground near 
the pheasant pens and I believe they 
could not stand the vermin. 



NOTES FROM THE GAME FARMS AND PRESERVES. 



Quail Breeding. 

We would strongly urge our readers 
to undertake quail breeding. Our adver- 
tisers soon can supply several species of 
quail and The Game Breeder will pub- 
lish many articles about the successful 
breeding of quail. Soon the laws will 
be amended so as to permit and encour- 
age the breeding of quail for sport and 
for profit and those who get their orders 
in first will be served first. The experi- 
ments made this year prove that cock 
quail will adopt broods of one day old 
birds when they are properly offered to 
them. A penned quail will lay enough 
eggs to provide two good bevies and if 
gardens are made suitable for their rear- 
ing many young easily can be reared and 
permitted to fly out into the adjoining 
fields. These should be planted so as to 



make them safe and attractive. The in- 
dustry of quail breeding is most inter- 
esting and it can be made most profitable 
for both game farmers and sportsmen 
as soon as the laws everywhere permit 
quail breeding as they now do in several 
States. 

Next year the Game Conservation So- 
ciety will breed ruffed grouse and prairie 
grouse both in a wild state, in captivity, 
and by a new method which has not been 
tried, but which we are sure will produce 
excellent results. Stories of the experi- 
mental work will appear in The Game 
Breeder. All crops will be gathered by 
shooting. 

Running QuaiL 

The plumed and crested quail or part- 
ridges of the Southwestern States and 
California it is well known do not lie 



It) 



THE GAME BREEDER 



well to the dog as the bobwhite of the 
Eastern States does. Mr. Grinnell, in 
his chapter on the bobwhite, referring 
to the Texas quail which is somewhat 
smaller and lighter in color than the 
Northern and Eastern quails, says, 
"The uneducated birds of the Southwest 
do not furnish the same sport furnished 
by birds frequently pursued, but show 
the disposition to run before the dog 
exhibited by the other quail of the dry 
country — Gambel's, the scaled and the 
valley quails." 

We have never heard complaints about 
the running of bobwhites in Texas and 
we are inclined to believe that the quail 
shot today lie well to the dog, but it 
would be interesting to hear from our 
Texas readers if there are still any bob- 
whites which are sufficiently uneducated 
to run away before the dog. 

The distinguished ornithologist, the 
late Dr. Elliot Coues, expressed the 
opinion that probably the Northern quail 
of the Eastern United States once were 
. runners. Writing about the blue or 
scaled quail in Arizona he says: "It 
generally trusts to its legs rather than 
its wings, though these are not at all 
deficient in size or strength. On level 
ground it glides along with marvelous 
celerity, and makes good progress over 
the most rocky and difficult places. As 
a consequence it is rather difficult to 
shoot fairly, though it may be 'potted' in 
great style by one so disposed; and it 
will probably require several generations 
in training before it can be taught to lie 
well to a dog. I am inclined to think, 
indeed, that the lying of quail, an es- 
sential feature for the chase in its per- 
fection, is almost as much a result of 
education as the 'pointing' that the in- 
telligent brute who helps us kill, them 
has learned. In a primitive and strictly 
natural condition, quail, as a general 
rule, rather use their legs to escape pur- 
suit than squat and attempt to hide. That 
the reverse is the case with the Virginia 
quail I am perfectly aware, but this 
proves nothing to the contrary, and I 
am inclined to think its crouching, till 
almost trodden upon, to be an acquired 
trick. This would surely be a poor way 



of escape from any of its natural ene- 
mies 1 — any carnivorous bird or mammal ; 
yet they found it to succeed so well 
against their chief persecutor, that he 
has had to call in the aid of a sharper- 
sighted, sharper nosed brute than him- 
self, else he might stumble over stubble- 
fields all day without seeing a bird, ex- 
cept by accident. I presume that Vir- 
ginia quail, in. the days of Captain Smith 
and Pocahontas, were very much in the 
social status of the Arizonian today; 
and these certainly trust to their legs 
and wings rather than to the artifice of 
thrusting their heads in tussocks of grass 
and then fancying they are safe." 

The experiments with the Gambel's 
quail being made this year, at the Long 
Island Game Breeders' Association game 
farm, we hope will prove if these run- 
ners can be taught good sporting man- 
ners and to lie well to the dog. Since 
the place was started very late in the 
season I fear that many of the young 
quail may not survive because they may 
not be large enough to stand the cold if 
we have an early winter or early cold 
storms in the autumn. 

The following is front a bulletin is- 
sued (1885) by the U. - S. Department 
of Agriculture: "The question is often 
asked whether the habit quail have of 
lying to the dog is natural or acquired. 
To get a satisfactory answer one has 
only to hunt in different parts of Indian 
Territory (now Oklahoma). In the re- 
gion west of Fort Sill the quail never 
think of stopping when they see a dog, 
but run as fast as possible, and upon- his 
near approach they flush immediately, 
just as one may suppose they do on the 
approach of a coyote. In the eastern 
part of the Territory, near the railroad, 
the quail lie quite well to a dog and, as 
they are exceedingly abundant, excel- 
lent sport may be had from November 
until March." 



The Use of Incubators. 

An incubator helps the keeper to cope 
with the whims and frailties of brood- 
ing hens. It is always ready to receive 
those unexpected eggs which may be 
brought to his cottage at any moment. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



17 



as when sitting birds are disturbed by 
sheep or cut out in the mowing grass. 
And it is ready to take charge of the 
eggs abandoned by a fowl, or the chipped 
eggs of a foster mother which shows an 
inclination to crush the chicks as hatched. 
Yet it will be long before it ousts the 
broody barndoor hen from the rearing 
field. — Owen Jones, in Game Keeper's 
Notebook. 

Our readers will remember that Mr. 
Dusette used successfully a mammoth 
incubator to hatch wild ducks. Mr. 
Duncan Dunn, one of the most capable 
gamekeepers in America, has a room full 
of incubators and has used them suc- 
cessfully to hatch pheasant eggs. The 
Long Island Game Breeders' Associa- 
tion this year hatched both Gambel's and 
bobwhite quail eggs in an incubator and 
many broods of quail are now in the 
gardens in charge of cock bobwhites 
which were induced to adopt them. This 
experiment and some others will be de- 
scribed in an early number of The Game 

Breeder. 

♦ 

Field sports tend to keep people in the 
country and form a sufficient counter- 
poise to the pleasures of the town. They 
add to the value of farms and country 
places and provide an outdoor employ- 
ment for many people. Game breeding 
soon will produce excellent food abund- 
antly. 

Posting of Preserves, Private Parks, 
and Farms. 

Many States require the owners of 
farms and country places who wish to 
escape the roar of the autumn battle 
(when any rabbits or quail occur) to 
post notices or signboards warning tres- 
passers that they must not shoot up the 
farm or country place, preserve as they 
say in the older countries, game ranch 
as they say in the West. We have re- 
peated calls for information as to what 
kind of signs and how many are re- 
quired, the proper spacing, etc. 

In New York the law reads, "§362. 
Notices or sign-boards not less than one 
foot square warning all persons against 
hunting or fishing or trespassing thereon 



for that purpose, shall be conspicuously 
posted and maintained on a private park 
not more than forty rods apart close to 
and along the entire boundary thereof, 
and there shall be so placed at least one 
notice or signboard on each side and one 
at each corner of such park and where 
an outer boundary runs along or under 
any waters, the nearest shore or banks 
within the park shall be deemed the 
boundary for the purpose of posting such 
notices or signboards. It shall also be 
considered due service of notice for 
trespass upon any person or persons, by 
serving them personally in the name of 
the owner or owners of such private 
park with a written notice containing a 
brief description of the premises, warn- 
ing all persons against hunting or fishing 
or trespassing thereon." 

§364. Protection of private lands 
not parks. An owner or person having 
the exclusive right to hunt or fish upon 
inclosed or cultivated lands, or to take 
fish in a private pond or stream and 
desiring to protect the same, shall main- 
tain notices or signboards of the size, 
and posted and maintained in the ma. 
ner described in the preceding section. 

§364 provides that signs shall not be 
defaced or removed or injured. 

The penalties provided are that vio- 
lators shall be guilty of a' misdemeanor 
and shall be liable to exemplary damages 
in the sum of twenty-five dollars for 
each offense or trespass to be recovered 
by the owner of the land or hunting and 
fishing rights thereon. 

We cannot, of course, print all of the 
State laws on this subject and probably 
by the time we printed them many would 
be changed. Any reader can ascertain 
just what these and other laws relating 
to game are in his State by addressing a 
letter to "State Game Officer," at the 
State capitol. In some States the officer 
is called Commissioner, in others Game 
Warden. "State Game Officer" will 

reach him. 

♦ 

One Day Old Chicks. 

Reliable Poultry Journal believes that 
the action of Hon. J. C. Koons, First 
Assistant Postmaster General, in admit- 



18 



THE GAME BREEDER 



ting live day-old chicks to the U. S. mails 
for delivery as parcel post was the most 
important single act of our gorernment 
in behalf of the poultry industry since 
our country was drawn into the world 
war. 

The Game Breeder, also, appreciates 
this wise action. The Game Conserva- 
tion Society has demonstrated that both 
one day old pheasants and wild ducks 
can be shipped safely by parcel post and 
it no doubt will soon be able to show 
that one day old quail, prairie grouse 
and other wild food birds classed as 
game can be marketed in this manner. 



Migratory Birds. 

Persons wishing to procure migratory 
wild fowl for game farming purposes 
can have them trapped by the advertisers 
in The Game Breeder, many of whom 
are well equipped to perform this service 
at moderate prices. The Game Conser- 
vation Society will purchase all its birds 
used in experimental work from those 
who advertise in the magazine. As soon 
as it is finally settled that the Biological 
Survey cannot stop an owner from 
shooting his birds, if he wishes to do so, 
the preserve owners and syndicate 
shoots will purchase large numbers of 
ducks and geese. 

The opinion is gaining that the owner 
of food birds, who has acquired his title 
by purchase, gift or in any legal manner, 
really owns his birds and that he can 
safely multiply them for food, for profit 
and for sport. Of course if the laws in- 
tended to save wild game could be ap- 
bhed to these food birds there would be 
no production. 

* 

Wartime Wild Rabbits. 

War time conservation of beef and 
pork has enabled a Kansan to develop a 
rather extraordinary business in the 
marketing of wild rabbits, both jacks 
and cottontails. A rabbit packing plant 
has been established and is now ship- 
ping frozen bunnies by the tens of thou- 
sands. 

A recent contract called for 480,000 
pounds of jack rabbit meat. The jacks 
average four pounds each when dressed. 



This means that approximately 120,000 
rabbits were required to fill the order. 

The fur is disposed of at a handsome 
profit. It is used in the manufacture of 
high grade felt, such as enters into the 
making of men's hats. 

All waste products are converted into 
fertilizer. The industry also rids the 
country of a crop-destroying pest. 

Wartime pheasants now are produced 
in America in big numbers. The reason 
why more pheasants are not seen in the 
markets is that new game breeding 
plants starting so rapidly and numerous- 
ly that most of the pheasants are sold 
for breeding stock. Oh my! What a 
crop there will be when all the game 
breeders are running full time with 
plenty of stock birds ! 



Ruffed Grouse. 

Repeatedly we are asked why the 
ruffed grouse are vanishing. The an- 
swer seems plain. It is because they 
are not properly looked after. If a little 
shooting be done by many guns there 
are not enough birds left for breeding 
stock. We have seen the grouse made 
quite plentiful on protected areas where 
they were properly looked after and 
where it would be safe to shoot some 
every season because the hawks, foxes 
and other enemies were destroyed and 
the gunners safely could shoot the birds 
which would have been eaten by natural 
enemies. 

Grouse are very good to eat and we 
feel quite sure that in spite of laws pro- 
viding for closed seasons many are shot 
and trapped every year. The taking of 
only a few birds in this manner is too 
many in places where natural enemies 
are plentiful and where eggs are eaten 
by crows, snakes and other vermin and 
where hawks, foxes and other ground 
and winged vermin live on grouse. 

At a place where we visited some years 
ago the grouse were quite plentiful in 
charge of a gamekeeper but in shooting 
on neighboring grounds we found and 
destroyed many snares and traps which 
no doubt took entirely enough birds to 
cause their scarcity or extinction. It is 
quite impossible to stop the people who 



THE GAME BREEDER 



19 



take grouse in this manner or to prevent 
considerable illegal shooting with a war- 
den force such as provided for by the 
States. When the birds have become 
.scarce it should be evident there are not 
enough to supply the needs of the 
numerous natural enemies. If any snar- 
ing or illegal shooting goes on, as it 
surely does, nature's balance is badly 
upset and the closed season, undesirable 
as it is, cannot be expected to produce 
the desired result. 

One reason why it is easier to pre- 
serve deer in public woods is the evi- 
dence of crime is bigger and more apt to 
be discovered than it is in the case of 
smaller game which can be pocketed. 
Another and an important reason that 
the deer have few natural enemies which 
formerly checked their increase. The 
wolves and in some States the mountain 
lions and wild cats are gone, and the 
eagles which took many small deer are 
scarce. As a result the deer can in- 
crease in suitable woods during closed 
seasons. But there are places where the 
crows alone are sufficient to prevent an 
increase of the grouse. In all proba- 
bility many grouse are shot in violation 
of law even in remote regions. The 
shooting of a few we should remember 
is too. many in all cases where the grouse 
are scarce when compared with their 
abundant natural enemies. 

It is remarkable how well the grouse 
hold out on populous Long Island since 
the game preserving on many of the pre- 
served areas is not nearly as thorough as 
it should be and there are entirely too 
many cats. We saw some very big ones 
recently which were taken in traps. 



Our Prairie Grouse Experiment. 

The Game Conservation Society has 
expended over one hundred dollars so 
far this season in the effort to get a few 
pairs of prairie grouse. Since the money 
was sent to State officers in some cases, 
and in others the birds were hunted up 
and located on farms in several States 
whose owners say they will ship them, 
it would seem likely that our grouse 
breeding experiments will proceed next 
season, the birds being procured in time. 



We have many disappointments about 
the prairie grouse — about one a week on 
the average. The worst one consisted of 
a refusal of an officer (who said he could 
get us some chickens) either to produce 
the birds or the money sent to him. 
Registered letters remain unanswered. 
We hope it will not be necessary for us 
to publish the correspondence and an il- 
lustration showing the check which went 
through the banks and the endorse- 
ment. This will not be done for an- 
other month when we expect to make 
some reports which should contain this 
item of expense. Possibly the money 
may be returned in the meantime. 

Today we have a letter from a dealer 
in the West who promised to send us 
prairie chickens. He says, "The scarcity 
of man power has made it impossible to 
secure enough skilled help even to take 
care of our breeding birds. This scarcity 
of men makes it impractical to attempt 
to trap the birds" (chicken). 

Another letter in today's mail is much 
more encouraging and we hope to an- 
nounce the arrival of the chickens in 
our next Issue. 

If this note about chickens meets the 
eye of our friend Dr. Fisher, he will 
be reminded of some recent correspond- 
ence in which he referred pleasantly to 
our remarks about his plea for the breed- 
ing of grouse. We are well prepared to 
do the breeding but we must have some 
birds to lay the eggs. Think of a pro- 
tective system, good in many ways, 
which prevents the securing of the birds 
or eggs of a common species for breed- 
ing purposes ! 

Something About Crows. 

The City Point correspondent of the 
Bangor News has the following to say 
on the crow question : 

Crows are more tame and troublesome 
this year than ever before. Very early 
in the spring they began to get familiar, 
and we saw them many times in the 
trees surrounding the houses, and were 
awakened in the early morning by their 
unmusical conversation. We have a 
friend up in the White Mountains who 
has made a study of crow language, and 



20 



THE GAME BREEDER 



spends a lot of time in the early spring- 
time trying to find out what the crows 
are talking about. He wrote a magazine 
article on the subject and got it pub- 
lished. I wish he worked as hard as we 
did lately to plant a lot of sweet corn, 
and then had gone out as we did the 
other day and found two-thirds of those 
beautiful green shoots of sweet corn laid 
low and perishing with the kernel of 
corn eaten off the roots. In my opinion 
it wouldn't have taken any study to have 
found out what those men were talking 
about at that moment, and we doubt if 
any first-class magazine would have 
cared to publish the article. Yet they 
tell us that crows are scavengers, and as 
such ought to be protected. In our corn- 
fields is every device to scare the crows, 
even to an artistic auburn-haired scare- 
crow. Twine was strung and white rags 
waved in the breeze all along the line. 
Tin cans and pails were stuck around on 
poles. We had been told that tin would 
scare the crows, and confidently left a 
paper bag of seed corn with some other 
things in an old tin boiler on the ground. 
Next morning the paper bag was torn 
open and not a vestige of the corn re- 
mained. In our opinion any protection 
given to such pests as these is a mis- 
take, and any talk of it is worthy to be 
listed in the same category with what 
the crows are talking about. The only 
thing good enough for a crow is a shot- 
gun. — Maine Woods. 



Shooting the Movies. 

The casual visitor to a shooting gal- 
lery displaying the sign, "Shooting the 
Movies," would be led to think that 
the old-time shooting gallery, with its 
moving array of ducks and deer, had 
been displaced by a regular moving pic- 
ture, which gives a man a chance to 
shoot a real picture of the wild game 
which he shoots in the open. It is true 
that moving pictures of wild game now 
form the marks for the customers of a 
shooting gallery, but few persons realize 
the complicated electrical system needed 
to make this sort of shooting possible. 
A man shooting at objects in a moving 



picture would soon discover that almost 
before he pulled the trigger some other 
object would be in view. In order to 
make , it possible to actually see where 
the animal has been hit, a complicated 
electrical system is necessary. The sys- 
tem is under Swiss patent and the con- 
trolling mechanism is a microphone. The 
report of the gun is recorded by the 
microphone, which in turn operates elec- 
trical devices which instantly stop the 
projecting machine, allowing the one 
shooting to see exactly where the animal 
is hit, and then automatically start the 
projecting machine again. The same 
system automatically changes the paper 
background of the picture, covering up 
the bullet hole, and so prepares the tar- 
get for the next shot. 

At the beginning of the war the Brit- 
ish Government became interested in 
developing some device for giving rifle 
practice to prospective soldiers. Fifty 
thousand pounds was set aside, and 
finally the electrical devices necessary to 
make "shooting the movies" possible 
were developed. Apparatus of this kind 
is now installed on the larger battle- 
ships, in aero stations and in training 
stations. Moving pictures of submarines 
and periscopes form the targets for those 
on board ship, whereas soldiers going 
over the top often form the target at 
training camps. 

The present apparatus has been per- 
fected after eighteen months of work 
and is proving very satisfactory. Lubfin 
& Butler have opened a shooting gallery 
of this type on Market Street in San 
Francisco and the same firm expects to 
introduce this new sport in all of the 
larger cities of the West. Needless to 
say, this new sport develops the ability 
to shoot quickly and accurately. — Cali- 
fornia Fish and Game. 



Mr. Bullock of the Scarboro Beach 
Game Farm, Scarboro, Maine, writes 
that he has clear straight Black Duck 
for sale at $6.0Q per pair. He also has 
Blue Winged Teal at $5.00 per pair. 
The Long Island Game Breeders Asso- 
ciation has purchased some and it seems 



THE GAME BREEDER 



21 



likely that the Black Duck and the Teal 
■quickly will be taken by breeders who are 
interested in wild fowl. 



Discretionary Powers. 

California Fish and Game reviews the 
various laws giving State officers dis- 
cretionary powers to make closed seasons 
for fish in certain waters and for game 
on certain areas when it appears that 
the game and fish are vanishing and need 
protection. 

It cannot be denied that the necessity 
for closing vast areas in most of the 
States, and in fact closing all of the area, 
will become more and more apparent so 
long as the number of the guns increases 
and no one is permitted to look after the 
game properly. We have entertained 
the idea that crime was a serious matter 
and that many new crimes should not be 
made arbitrarily, the danger being that 
persons ignorant of the new regulations 
and crime boundaries might be punished. 
We will not object to this method of 
creating new criminal laws, however, if 
the States will provide that nothing 
in the laws or regulations shall be held 
to prohibit the profitable production of 
game and its sale as food from places 
where it is produced for this purpose. 
To provide arbitrarily that a State de- 
partment may close the killing of chick- 
ens or ducks for a term of years would 
put an end to the poultry industry. The 
game breeding industry, which has be- 
come an important food-producing in- 
dustry in America in spite of many legal 
obstacles, should not be arbitrarily ter- 
minated in the interest of a game protec- 
tion industry which never has been able 
to supply the markets or even to furnish 
a reasonable amount of sport in closely 
cultivated regions. It is a poor time just 
how for a State department to insist that 
it must be criminal to produce food on 
the farms and arbitrary decrees closing 
the shooting will put an end to game 
production in places where such industry 
is legal. The farmers will soon express 
themselves on this subject. Many women 
game breeders will join them, and we 
can hardly believe a majority of the 
sportsmen will insist in war times that 
people must be arrested if they produce 



game for food. We have a large ac- 
quaintance among sportsmen in many 
States and we do not know a single one 
who will declare that it should be crimi- 
nal to produce food on a farm. 

Cheering Comment. 

A State Game Officer writes to the edi- 
tor : "I have read with much interest the 
Game Breeder and wish to commend you 
and your publication for the thorough 
manner in which you are making a fight 
for better game conditions and legisla- 
tion in the United States." 

We believe all intelligent State game 
officers would prefer to see game plenti- 
ful and the shooting good to seeing the 
dove, the quail, the prairie grouse, the 
ruffed grouse, the wood-cock on the song 
bird list and most of the farmers up in 
arms, so to speak, against sportsmen and 
the departments l'epresenting them. The 
departments easily can be made of great 
economic importance, by permitting those 
who wish to engage in food production 
and field sports to do so, the result will 
be that the wild lifing outfits can be run 
out when they try to make laws for 
States where they do not reside, just as 
they were run off of Long Island when 
they tried to put an end to food produc- 
tion and field sports there. If any one 
can shoot quail quite near New York 
without the wild lifing assistance why 
should not the sport be preserved every- 
where. There must, of course, be some 
producers. We cannot all be destroyers. 



BOOK REVIEWS. 

TWO GOOD BOOKS. 

"War-Time Poultry Feeding" and "Back- 
yard Poultry Keeping" are two good and 
timely books. The "Back-yard" book tells us 
how this area can be made to pay, describes 
what is possible and explains the industry 
from start to finish, giving estimates of cost 
and profit and telling the reader what to pur- 
chase, what to feed and all the "whys and 
wherefores." 

"War-Time Poultry Feeding" has much of 
value and interest not only for war-time but 
for all other times. Here as elsewhere war 
economies may become valuable, not only for 
the present but also for the future. There 
are chapters on Poultry Foods,' Feeding 
Chicks, Feeding Fowls for Eggs, Making a 
Profit with Poultry and The Feeding of By- 
products; there are numerous short articles 
by authoritative writers on many subjects. 



22 



THE GAME BREEDER 



"OTHERWISE THAN BY SHOOT- 
ING." 

We understand that the Biological 
Survey is very receptive to the idea that 
game farmers should have some shooting 
customers. They must if game rapidly 
is to become tremendously plentiful for 
profit, for sport and for food. We hope 
the Survey will not cogitate on this sub- 
ject as long as it did on the Mexican 
quail question. We were afraid the 
quail would be laying in the South before 
we could secure the stock of breeders to 
be transported north. The Secretary of 
Agriculture took the proper view of the 
matter when we brought it before him 
and our readers will remember the tele- 
gram marked rush announcing the ear- 
lier opening for quail importations which 
we published. 

In matters of game breeding and in 
matters of all business for that matter, 
speed is desirable. Eggs spoil if they 
are kept too long. Quail die if kept too 
long in boxes waiting for the action of 
"hoss doctors" as one of our readers 
puts it. We know how easy it is to go 
slow in all official matters but one thing 
the Survey can bank on, when we ask 
for anything it is right and proper. Al- 
though at first blush it may not seem to 
be good politics we can guarantee it as 
Al. Bunch all the interests which talk 
about free shooting on the farms and 
include all who say it should be criminal 
to produce certain kinds of plants or 
animals and let the farmers fully under- 
stand the question and we will guarantee 
that they will vote with the intelligent 
sportsmen who admit they cannot even 
shoot up the farmers' trespass signs with 
impunity. The women who have been 
arrested for having eggs or birds in their 
possession also will vote for good gov- 
ernment we are quite sure and there are 
several women among the hundreds who 
are breeding game who are very good 
talkers. So even if the Survey should 
happen to be a Republican or a Demo- 
cratic outfit (we know no politics here) 
it should have no fear when The Game 
Breeder says anything is right and pro- 
per. Speed it up. The proper method 
of taking game is by shooting. Salt on 
the tail is old style. 



Editor Game Breeder : 

Looking over the Migratory Bird Law 
in The Game Breeder, 1 find that the 
duck law calls for an open season on 
Long Island October 16- January 31. 
The State law is October 1-January 15. 
Woodcock Migratory Bird Law, October 
1-November 30; State law for Long 
Island, October 15-November 30. 

Who's who and what's what? Your 
interpretation will be appreciated. 
Yours truly, 

H. J. Montanus. 

When the State laws and the Migra- 
tory Bird Law conflict we believe the 
regulation makers for U. S. hold that 
the State law is supposed to fix the dates 
provided the State dates fall within the 
national dates. If, for example, the State 
law for woodcock is as you say it is (and 
if you saw it in The Game Breeder it's 
true) that is October 15, this is O. K.,. 
since it is later than October 1, the date 
fixed by regulation makers. In the case 
of wild ducks, although the State, which 
is said to own the ducks, says they may 
be shot October 1, we believe the regu- 
lation makers claim they have amended 
this State law by making a regulation 
fixing October 16 as the date when they 
would prefer to see the New York duck 
shooters get busy. One of the advisers, 
told us there was plenty of beef and 
mutton for the people to eat, and it was- 
not necessary for them to have any game 
in America. Although this statement 
was made before the war, he still holds 
that it is a European custom to have 
game and that it is quite different in this 
country, where, he might have added, the 
people seem to like to be humbugged by 
those who collect vast sums to see that 
they get what they are supposed to want. 

You may have noticed that our request 
that the law be amended so as to read 
that it should not be construed to apply 
to game farms and preserves, and the 
sale of the game by those who wished to 
sell was granted. We insisted upon this, 
so that those who look after their game 
would have to spend all of their time in 
ascertaining if the laws are the same 
as they were when they were issued. By 
keeping the game laws off the farms 



THE GAME BREEDER 



23 




JEAN and DAN 
On the Mississippi Training Ground of River Lawn Kennel. 



-See Advertisement 



where game is produced, the sportsmen 
who prefer to do so can shoot without 
interference, and if they need some 
money to help pay expenses they can let 
the people have some game to eat. 

Many thousands of sportsmen now 
enjoy good shooting and are not obliged 
to keep up with season and bag limits. 

Editor Game Breeder : 

I belong to a duck club and wish to 
know if our members can shoot ducks 
on Long Island, N. Y., on October 1, 
when the State law opens the season for 
ducks, or if we must wait until October 
16, when the Migratory Law says the 
season opens. 

A Rural New Yorker. 

Our answer to another letter, above, 
will answer your question as far as we 
are able to answer it. We have been 
told that the State is not obliged to exe- 
cute the national regulation and that the 
United States was not ready just yet to 
execute it. Our opinion is, if the courts 
hold the national regulation to be a valid 
United States criminal law, the United 
States regulators may attempt to gather 
some fines from those who only obey the 
State law. We regret to see the duck 
shooting season shortened so as to cut 
out the best two weeks for duck shooting 
on Long Island at a time when there is 
a shortage in our food supply. 



The Prairie Grouse. 

It seems a pity to substitute pheasants 
for the splendid American grouse and 
to let the grouse go the way of the wild 
pigeon and the bison. The laws which 
favor and encourage pheasant breeding 
have produced results, just as we knew 
they would, and we have no hesitation in 
saying that laws permitting and encour- 
aging grouse production soon will make 
the grouse plentiful. There can be no 
doubt that grouse will sell readily at $5 
each and more there can be no doubt that 
their eggs will sell for $5 or $10 per 
dozen. Any one with common sense 
should know that there are plenty of 
people willing to go into any profitable 
industry and The Game Breeder will 
furnish plans and specifications for those 
who wish to produce grouse for sport 
or for profit. 

From reports coming to The Game 
Breeder it would seem that the ruffed 
grouse also needs the attention of game 
breeders if it is not to go on the song bird 
list temporarily and, later, forever. 



East Cleveland, Ohio. 

[Many of our readers are familiar with the 
unrevised story of the man who, when served 
with olives for the first time, said he would 
like to lick the fellow who put up those plums. 
— Editor.l 



24 



THE GAME BREEDER 



T^ e Game Breeder 



Published Monthly 



Edited by DWIGHT W. HUNTINGTON 



NEW YORK, OCTOBER, 1918. 



TERMS: 

10 Cents a Copy — $1.00 a year in Advance. 

Postage free to all subscribers in the United States. 
To All Foreign Countries and Canada, $1.25. 

The Game Conservation Society, Inc. 
publishers, 150 nassau st., new york 

D. W. Huntington, President, 

F. R. Peixotto. Treasurer, 

J. C. Huntington, Secretary. 
E. Dayton, Advertising Manager. 
Telephone, Beekman 3685. 



THE SOFT PEDAL. 

We are glad to announce that an end 
to the controversy about the game laws 
is in sight. We are glad to be able to 
use the soft pedal in the future and we 
are sure our readers will be pleased to 
read more stories about game and fewer 
stories about how the game laws have 
been amended so as to keep game breed- 
ers out of jail. 

Section 12 of the Migratory Bird law 
is just what we wanted and we under- 
stand the "otherwise than by shooting" 
regulation will be repealed. The State 
game officers, assembled in New York 
recently, passed a resolution providing 
that all States which had not done so 
should enact laws encouraging game 
breeding. 

In bidding farewell to controversy it 
seems proper to say a few words about 
the occasion for certain forms of it. 
It was not an easy matter to start a 
trade paper in the interest of an illegal 
industry. Many predicted failure. We 
had no idea that the magazine would 
have any real enemies and it has had 
none among fair-minded, intelligent 
people. The number of requests for it, 
coming from libraries, scientific institu- 
tions and colleges and from judges, law- 
yers, doctors, professors and from prom- 
inent sportsmen and agriculturists indi- 
cate that the work of the society and its 



bulletin are appreciated by people whose 
influence for good amounts to something. 

When' the magazine was ' started and 
the dean of American sportsmen, the 
late Charles Hallock, wrote a letter 
praising and 'indorsing its policy, we 
were a little surprised to learn that the 
zoo superintendent had broken loose 
and was running about saying, "Our 
enemies are publishing a' monthly maga- 
zine." We wondered for a long time 
who the other fellow could be since the 
word "our" seemed to indicate there 
were two of a kind, which seemed im- 
possible. It occurred to us that a few 
playful remarks about the zoo man and 
his fund ($104,000) might make the 
wild lifing campaign lively and tend to 
offset the remarks about "our enemies." 

We were quite sure that the wild lifing 
director, when he announced his cam- 
paign of animosity towards the little 
magazine, would be helpful and not 
harmful, and we were just wicked 
enough to speed him up a bit. New- 
subscribers dropped in to see what the 
trouble was about and they all became 
regular readers. The late Mr. Hill, a 
talented and capable editor who some- 
times brought Out The Game Breeder 
when the writer could not do so, cleverly 
remarked that "those who came to scoff 
remained to pray." Having been bene- 
fited, why should we entertain any ani- 
mosity? We never did. So far as the 
"enemy" business was concerned if was 
all one-sided. People sometimes are 
heard to say they are proud of their ene- 
mies but we have never had any spare 
time or any inclination for pride. 

It is the duty of a trade paper to look 
after the interests of its readers and ad- 
vertisers and to publish items of news 
in its field. When the arms and am- 
munition people donated $25,000 to the 
Audubon Association, an old, well estab- 
lished and reputable organization, we 
approved the gift. We know full well 
that this association is not opposed to the 
breeding, shooting and the sale of game. 
But in all our game farming experience 
we never heard a pig under a gate squeal 
louder than the wild lifer did when he 
heard of the proposed donation. This 



THE GAME BREEDER 



25 



reminds us that Professor Pearson, Sec- 
retary of the Audubon Association, 
wrote us that the producer of a wild 
food bird should have as much right to 
sell his game as the producer had to 
sell a pig. 

Our remarks about the zoo superin- 
tendent were playful, not malicious. 
When. $28,000 was raised to prohibit the 
sale of game in New York, we were 
glad to help those who amended the bill 
so that it would permit and not prevent 
a regulated sale of game. It was not 
difficult to have it enacted after the 
proper amendment was made. 

A big mistake was made in not per- 
mitting the sale of quail. It would be 
easy and interesting to make these birds 
an abundant food supply on areas where 
they no longer occur. Some industry 
would be required, of course. When the 
notable attempt was made to close the 
quail shooting on Long Island, we in- 
vited a lot of people to hear "our enemy"' 
at his best, in connection with another 
naturalist, Dr. Weeks, D. S. C, etc., etc. 
We were pleased, as usual, at the result 
of the hearing. Wild lifing again ap- 
peared in the role of humpty-dumpty. 

We have always invited the wild-lifer 
to our annual game dinners and we have 
reserved a place for him on an impor- 
tant committee, which will be announced 
later. We hope he will regard our play- 
ful remarks as no more harmful than 
his calling us "our enemies" was. Both 
sides secured a little much needed pub 
licity and we now close the account and 
call it square. 

We have opposed the wild-lifmg in- 
dustry only when it appeared to inter- 
fere with the game-breeding industry. 
When attempts were made to secure 
laws prohibiting the sale of game, or 
shooting, we have insisted on short 
amendments permitting the shooting and 
the sale of game by breeders and their 
customers. If necessary, we shall con- 
tinue this activity and see that any 
proposed laws which prevent the produc- 
tion of food on the farms be amended 
so as to permit and encourage food pro- 
duction. Present indications are that 
our work will be easy, now that game 
breeding has become very successful and 
the best State game officers favor it. 



We are confident that patriotic State 
game officers understand that it is de- 
sirable to encourage and not to prevent 
food production. We are quite sure 
that the legislation intended to encour- 
age it will be favored and not prevented 
by the Audubon Association and that 
before long it will not be criminal to 
produce and sell any kinds of plants or 
animals on the farms. We must admit 
we were a little alarmed at one time 
about the national law, and especially 
when we were told the game breeders' 
interests could not be protected, but that 
is all over now. A pace has been set 
by the Nation which the patriotic States 
will follow. 



A Preliminary Demand. 

One of the things that create fear of 
a leather shortage is the enormous de- 
mand for suit-cases created by the estab- 
lishment of Prohibition areas. — Wash- 
ington Star. 

•+ 

Another Doorknob Snake. 

Discovering that snakes were eating 
the "nest eggs" where his hens were lay- 
ing, J. P. Gill, of Albany, Ga., replaced 
the initial eggs with white doorknobs. A 
snake was soon found which had swal- 
lowed one of the knobs, but could not 
"get away with it." The reptile was 
killed and the doorknob replaced in the 
nest. 



It Pays and Good Sense. 

The Game Breeder : 

Enclosed find check for advertisement. 
Please discontinue same, as I am about 
sold out of game. The first ad. sold two 
pairs of swans. The Game Breeder 
surely is a good advertising medium, as 
it hits them all ; and it is a sensible paper. 
I appreciate it. 

Colorado. j. L. Oakes. 

[Your ad. helped to put some common sense 
in the Migratory Bird Law. See Sec. 12, pro- 
tecting game farmers, and preserve owners. 
The last named are the best customers. There 
will be several thousand new ones next season. 
Do you know where we can get a couple of 
car loads of deer for one of the new places? 
Our advertisers all seem to sell out quickly. — 
Editor.] 



26 



THE GAME BREEDER 




PEINCES 

FOR GAME PRESERVES 

The accompanying photograph shows one of our Non-CIimbable 
" RIOT" fences, erected by us, with our indestructible steel fence post 
8 feet high, surrounding the Yale Bowl Field, New Haven, Conn. 

This fence held in check 80,000 people who attended the Harvard- 
Yale Game, November 25th, 1916, and 60,000 people who attended the 
Princeton-Yale Game, November 13th, 1915. 

We have this fence and many other excellent designs. It will be 
to your advantage to secure our Catalogue, that shows many of the 
best erected fences in this country ; also tells about our posts in 
detail ; how to erect a fence ; how to paint the fence wire to keep it 
from rusting. 

Become acquainted with our fence building system. It will save 
you many dollars and a great deal of worry. 

Fences for every purpose, with either straight or non-climbable post, 
tennis court back stops, etc., erected by our trained men anywhere. 



J. M. 

38 ROOSEVELT AVENUE 



DOWNS 

Suite A JERSEY CITY, N. J. 



RIVER LAWN GAME FARM 

JJ R. H. SIDWAY 

GRAND ISLAND, ERIE CO., N.'Y. 

Young Pheasants for Fall delivery 
extra fine, healthy non-related birds. 

My birds are raised for my own shooting and are very strong 

on the wing. 



Member of The Game Guild. 



Member American Game Breeders Society. 



FOR SALE. YOUNG BIRDS, THIS YEAR'S HATCH, 
one wingr pinioned. Silver, 17.50 per pair; Goldens, 
$7.50 per pair; Ringnecks, $500 per pair; Mongolians, 
$6.50 per pair; Lady Amhersis, $12.50 per pair; Reeves, 
$12.50 per pair; Redhead Ducks, $10.00 per pair; Man- 
darin Ducks. $12.50 per pair; Wood Ducks, $12.50 per pair; 
Mexican Tree Ducks, $12.50 per pair. M. R. CHEESMAN, 
Murray, R. F. D. No. 3, Utah. 3t 



Phone, 9286 Farragut FINE FURS 

JOHN MURGATROYD 

Taxidermist 

57 WEST 24th STREET 
Bet. Broadway and 6th Ave. NEW YORK 

Finest Work at Reasonable Prices 
Call and See for Yourself 



fREE FOUNDATION STOCK 

furnished to raise Rabbits, Cavies or 
Pigeons. Send dime for particulars and 
paper. 

Young's Tanning Compound, easily applied to any 
skin, large can $1.00, trial can 50c. Tattoo Ear 
Marker $1.50. Ear Tags 30c per dozen. Gibson's 
wonderful Rabbit Book $1.00. Cavy Book 50c. 
Squab Culture, a recognized authority on raising 
pigeons for profit, $1.00. 

NATIONAL FANCIER & BREEDER 

335 South East Avenue, Oak Park, III. 



The Breeders' and Fanciers' News 

SCRANTON, PA. 

devoted to the breeding and marketing of ducks 
geese, turkeys (including the wild varieties), rab- 
bits, cavies. pigeons, etc. Organ of the American 
Buttercup Club, and Waterfowl Club of America. 
Interesting and instructive articles by able writers. 

50c a Year, 3 Years for $1.00 
Canada 75c a Year, 3 Years $1.75 

Special Trial Offer in U. S , 8 Months for 25c 

AD. RATES: 75c an inch, or for 3 months or more 
at rate of 65c an inch. Classified, 2c a word. 

Address 
BREEDERS' AND FANCIERS' NEWS 

1558 Dickson Ave., Scranton, Pa. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sigrn your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



THE GAME BREEDER 27 



Pheasants, Wild Mallard Ducks & Wild Turkeys 

FOR SALE 

Hatched This Year 

Tamarack Farms, Dousman, Waukesha County, Wis. 



WILD DUCK rOODS 

Wild Celery, Sago Pond Weed. Widgeon Grass, Red-Head Grass, Chara and other foods which 
attract water fowl. "We have the best duck foods which will attract and hold the game and which 
impart the finest flavor to the flesh. We plan and arrange the plantings suitable to all waters. 

GOOD SHOOTING 

DURING THE OPEN SEASON 

I am prepared to entertain a number of sportsmen who wish to shoot wild geese, Canvasback and 
other wild ducks and quail, snipe, etc. Only small parties can be properly looked after. Appoint- 
ments to trv the shooting and learn about the wild duck foods are made by correspondence. 

J. B. WHITE WATERULY, CURRITUCK SOUND, NORTH CAROLINA 

Member of THE GAME GUILD 



Game Wanted 

•I We are in the market to buy game birds and deer 
raised on licensed game preserves. We can use 
quantities of venison, pheasants and mallard duck 
raised on licensed game farms and preserves which can 
be sold in New York State throughout the year but 
coming from points outside of New York State preserves 
must also have the New York State License in order to 
be permitted to ship in this State and be sold here. 

If you have game to sell, let us hear from you. 

House of A. SUZ 

414—420 West 14th Street -:- NEW YORK CITY 

Cable Address, SILZ, NEW YORK, Telephone, CHELSEA 4900 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters : "Yours for More Game.' 



28 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Wild Mallard Ducks 
and Ringneck Pheasants 

WRITE FOR PRICES 



Scarboro Beach Game Farm 




R. E. BULLOCK, Manager 

SCARBORO, - MAINE 

Member of the Game Guild 

We Furnish Eggs in Season 



's zr^^^m^ mm. 




**»* ..'"S^ps" 



PROFITS IN FUR FARMING 

Learn about the wonderful Black Fox 
Industry which has proven so profitable 
to breeders. 

Read the Black Fox Magazine, the only 
paper of its kind in the world. 

SAMPLE COPY FREE. 
Subscription $1.50 per year. 

THE BLACK FOX MAGAZINE 

15 Whitehall Street, New York 




Established 1860 Telephone 4569 Spring 

FRED SAUTER 

Leading Taxidermist of America 
42 Bleecker Street New York City 

Corner Lafayette Street Subway Station at the Door 

Specialist in All Branches of Taxidermy 

Write for Illustrated Catalogue 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



29 




WE HAVE 

For Sale 

Silver, Golden, Ring- 
neck, Lady Amherst, 
Formosan, White, 
Mongolian, Reeves, 
Swinhoe, Versicolor, Impeyan, Soem- 
mering, Manchurian Eared, Melano- 
tic, Black Throat Golden, Linneated 
and Prince of Wales Pheasants. 

Wild Turkeys, Japanese Silkies, 
Longtails, Mallard Ducks, S. C. Buff 
and Blue Orpingtons and R. 1. Reds. 
Five varieties of Peafowl, Crane, 
Swan, Fancy Ducks, Doves, Deer, 
Jack Rabbits. 

Send $1.00 for new Colortype Catalogue. Where 

purchase amounts to $10.00, price of 

catalogue refunded. 

CHILES & COMPANY 

MT. STERLING KENTUCKY 

Member of The Game Guild 
Member of The American Game Breeders Society 



Yama Brook Trout 



0i 

ft 



Scientifically bred by the Darwinian 
theory for vigor, quick growing to large size 
and to produce a large number of eggs — 
absolutely free of disease, frequently thriv- 
ing where others die. 

Information in reference to trout breed- 
ing and keeping cheerfully given by our 
trout culturist. 

Scientific examination made of your con- 
ditions for keeping trout at moderate charge. 

We have on hand for stocking 1,500,000 
Yama Trout from fry to 2 lbs. Eggs in 
seaaon. 

YAMA FARMS 
Napanoch, Ulster County, N. Y. 



OUR HOPE. 

We hope when the prospective cam- 
paigns scheduled for next winter and 
intended to make new song birds out of 
our natural food birds are on the legis- 
lative assemblies will have enough com- 
mon sense to add to the proposed bills 
some words in harmony with section 12 
of the new U. S. statute. 



LLEWELLYN SETTER PUPPIES 5 MONTHS OLD, 
one male $25.00, 3 females $15.00 each. 
Parents of these puppies are (iood close workers 
and keen srenled on all game. Apple E. WRAIGHT, 
Gamekeeper, West Hartland, Conn. it 



FOR SALE, WELL-BRED SETTERS 

Dogs Trained for Shooting*. 

Young Dogs Suitable for Training. 

WRITE FOR PRICES 

THE RIVER LAWN KENNELS 

Grand Island Erie Co., New York 

Member of The Game Guild 



DOGS 



HOUNDS— ALL KINDS. BIG50PAGE CATALOGUE 
10)5. ROOKWOOD KENNELS, Lexington, Kentucky. 

THE BLUE GRASS FARM KENNELS, of Berry, Ky., 
offer for sale setters and pointers, fox and cat hounds, 
wolf and deer hounds. Coon and opossum hounds, var- 
mint and rabbit hounds, bear and lion hounds, also Aire- 
•dale terriers. All dogs shipped on trial, purchaser to 
judge the quality, satisfaction guaranteed or money re- 
funded. Sixty page, highly illustrated, instructive and 
interesting catalogue for ten cents in stamps or coin. 

AIREDALE TERRIERS. The genuine one-man dog. 
Pedigreed, registered pups. Males $25.00. Females, 
$15.00. Guaranteed Satisfactory. L. E. GALLUP, 2100 
Og Jen, Omaha, Nebraska. 



Jte&K 


BOOK ON 


fw&i-- 


DOG DISEASES 


\?ipr 


And How to Feed 


America's 

Pioneer 

Dog Medicines 


Mailed free t» any address by 
the Author 

H. CLAY GLOVER CO., Inc., 
118 West 31st Street, New York 



TWO YOUNG LABRADOR RETRIEVERS FOR 

sale. Dog and Bitch. Apply, THOMAS BRIGGS, 

Arden, New York. 3t 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



30 



THE GAME BREEDER 




WILD TURKEYS 

Pure Bred Wild Turkeys 
Eggs in Season 

MARY WILKIE 

Beaver Dam, Virginia 

Member of the Game Guild 





PHEASANTS, PIGEONS AND 
EGGS. 

Pheasants, Amherst, Silver, Gold- 
en, Reeves, Mongolian, Swinhoe, 
Versicolor, Ring necks, Cochin 
Bantams, White King Pigeons. 
Eggs in Season. 

BLUE RIBBON POULTRY AND PHEASANT FARM 

Davenport Neck, Phone 655, New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Member of the Game Guild. 



REGISTERED BLACK FOXES, 
TROUT & HARES. 
Rugged pups, bred on highest 
ranch in America. 1917 Breeding 
Record. 8 litters from 8 females. 
Also Mountain Brook Trout. Milch 
Goats. Belgium and Flemish Hares. 

BORESTONE MOUNTAIN 
FOX RANCH 
Onawa - Maine 
Member of the Game Guild. 



MALLARDS AND BLACK DUCKS. 

Guaranteed Pure Bred Wild 
Ducks. Eggs in season. 15 Mal- 
lard eggs, $4.00, 100 eggs $25. 
15 Black Duck eggs, $0.00, 
100 eggs, $35. 

F..B. DUSETTE, 
Bad Axe, Michigan. 

Order Breeding Stock now to be 
grown for next season. There is 
a limit on Pure Wild stock. 

Member of the Game Guild. 

Do not write for prices or infor- 
mation. Send check. If birds do not please you 
return them and your money will be returned at once. 



LIVErGAME, ELK, DEER, WILD 
Turkeys, Quail, Pheasants, 
Ducks, and all other game. Eggs 
in season. See space advertise- 
ment. 

W. J. MACKENSEN, Yardley, Pa. 
Member of the Game Guild. 







Ill 


« 

<- 


1 



DARK MALLARD 
Black Duck, Mallard Hybrids 
These ducks are reared on free range 
especiallyfor shooting and for decoys. 
They are strong on the wing. Big 
egg producers under control 
Price $3.60 per pair ; $1 .75 each 

ALBERT F. HOLMES 

8 Bosworth St., Boston, Mass. 

Member of the Game Guild 



BREEDER OF FANCY PHEASANTS 

Eggs in season. Amhersts, Silver, 
Golden, Versicolor, Mongolian, 
Reeves, Ringnecks, Manchurian, 
Elliott, Swinhoe, Impeyan, Mela- 
notus, Soemmering. 

GRAY'S 
GOLDEN ^r POULTRY FARM 
Gifford Gray, Orange, New Jersey 

Member of the Game Guild. 



DR. FRANK KENT 

Importer Bob White Quail 

San Antonio, Texas. 

Book your orders now for early 

Fall and Spring delivery. 

Bank references. 

Member of the Game Guild. 



SEA CLIFF PHEASANTRY 
We have nearly all.of the rare pheas- 
ants and cranes, also white, Java and 
black shouldered Japanese Peafowl. 
Mandarin ducks. Eggs in Season for 
sale. Write for prices and particu- 

BALDWIN PALMER 
Villa Serena, Sea Cliff, Long Island, N. Y. M 

Member of the Game Guild. 6t 



PHEASANTS 
ENGLISH, RINGNECKS 

Pearl White Guineas and White 

Cochin Bantams 
Baby Pheasants and Eggs in Season 

THE HIRSCH POULTRY YARDS 
45th Place, Lyons, Illinois 



WILD DUCKS 
The practical rearing of wild ducks 
is fully described in the illustrated 
book, "Our Wild Fowl and Waders, ' ' 
written by the Editor of the Game 
Breeder. Price $2.00 post paid. 

THE GAME CONSERVATION 

SOCIETY, Publishers 

150 Nassau St., New York 






<| v« 



In writing to aclvertiseri please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More G«m«.' 






THE GAME BREEDER 



31 





GAME BIRDS 

All American game birds are fully 

described in the illustrated book, 

"Our Feathered Game," written by 

the Editor of the Game Breeder 

Price $2.00 

For sale by 

THE GAME CONSERVATION 

SOCIETY 

150 Nassau St., New York 



GOLDEN, SILVER, AMHERST, 
REEVES and RINGNECK 
PHEASANTS. 
All pure bred, strong healthy birds. 
Must be seen to be appreciated. 
Prices reasonable. Eggsin season. 

THOS. F. CHESEBROUGH 
Northport, Long Island, N. Y. 



WATER FOWL. 

I can supply nearly all species 
of wild water fowl and eggs at 
attractive prices. Mallards, Pin- 
tails, Teal, Canvasbacks, Red 
Heads, Gadwalls, Widgeons, 
Spoonbills, Canada Geese, Snow 
Geese and other wild ducks and 
geese. Write, stating what you 
want. 

GEORGE J. KLEIN, Naturalist 
Ellinwood, Kansas 




Mallard-Pintail 



PHEASANTS AND 

PHEASANT EGGS. 

We have Ringnecks and ten 
other species of Pheasants. 
Eggs in season. One day 
old pheasant chicks 65 
cents each. Flemish Giants 
and other rabbits. 

THE MAPLE GROVE PHEASANTRY AND 
STOCK FARM, 43ldenAve., Pelham Manor, 
Member of the Game Guild. 




PET 
N.Y. 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 

Announcements inserted under this head in small type for 3 cents per word. 
If displayed in heavy type, 5 cents per word. No advertisement accepted for less 
than 30 cents. Postage stamps accepted in payment. 



THE GAME 

150 Nassau Street 



BREEDER 

New York City 



FOR SALE 
These Pheasants will be in full plumage this fall : 4 pair 
Silvers, $30.00 ; 2 extra hens, $10.00. 1 pair Swinhoes, 
S35 00 1 pair Mongolian, $7.00; 3 extra cocks, $6.00- 
10 Ringneck hens. $30.00; 4 Ring neck cocks. $5.00 3 pair 
Lady Amhersts, $50-00 ; 1 extra cock, $10 00. 1 pair Gold- 
ens, $8 00 ; 3 extra hens. $15.00. 1 pair Reeves, $15.00 : 
2 extra hens, $20.00. 5 pair Canada geese, 5 years old, 
$35 00. 6 pair Redheads, $50 00; 1 pair Baldpates, $5-00; 
1 pair Pintails, $3 00. 1 pair wood ducks, $12-50 : 1 pair 
Mandarin ducks. $12 50. 1 pair Mexican tree ducks. $12.50. 
M. R. CHEESMAN, Murray, Utah, R F.D. No. 3. Box 61. 



FOR SALE-PET FEMALE COON. GUARANTEED 

breeder, three years old. Had five last litter. Stamp 

forreplv BEN BOWMAN, Monroe Ave., Canton, Ohio 

H y ' It 

RABBIT AND HARE SOCIETY OF CANADA. 

Breeders should write for constitution and by-laws. 

JOHN E. PEART, Secretary, Hamilton, Ontario. 12t 



WILL SELL THREE PAIR GOLDEN PHEASANTS, 

full plumage. $5.00 each bird; four pair Silver Pheasants, 
$4.00 each; Lady Amhersts; $6 00 each, this year's hatch. 
Golden Pheasants this year's hatch, $4.00 each. Prices un- 
changeable and for either sex. No attention given to price 
inquiries. G. L. DAVIS, Mt. Sinai, Long Island, N. Y. 2t 



LIVE GAME 



WILD TURKEYS— For prices see displav advertisement 
in this issue. W. J. MACKENSEN, Yardley, Bucks 
County, Pa. 

PHEASANTS FOR SALE-R1NGNECKS, SILVEP, 
Goldens, Mongolians, Formosan, Prince of Wales, Lady 
Amhersts, Reeves, Swinhoes, Melanotus, Versicolor, Man- 
chunan Eared. ROBINSON BROS., Aldershot, Ontario, 
Canada. 3^ 

PURE BRED WILD WATERbOWL AT FOLLOW- 
ing prices: Mallards. $3.75 per pair. Pintails, $3 25 per 
pair. Green Wing Teal, $5.00 per pair. Blue Wii g Teal, 
$3.75 per pair. Also redheads, Gadwalls, Widgeons, 
Canvasbacks, Spoonbills, at reasonable prices, for orona. 
gating and scientific purposes. GEORGE J. KLEIN. 
Ellinwood, Kansas. 



FOR SALE-THREE PAIRS OF WOOD DUCKS. 
GLENN CHAPMAN, 882 Lake Street, Newark, N. J. 3 t 

HOYT'S CALIFORNIA PHEASANTRY, PRICE LIST. 
FRED D. HOYT, Hayward, California. 



GRAY STAR PHEASANTRY 

Breeder of all kinds of pheasants. Eggs in season. 
Pure brand, strong, healthy birds for sale. GIFFORD 
GRAY, 21 Ward St., Orange, N. J. 



FOR SALE — Pheasants and eggs. Everything in the 
pheasant family. Pamphlet with order free. BUCK- 
WOOD PHEASANTRIES, Dunfield, Warren Co., New 
Jersey. (rot) 

QUAIL, PARTRIDGES, WILD FOWL, DEER AND 
other animals. See display advertisement in this issue. 
WM. J. MACKENSEN, Proprietor Pennsylvania Pheas- 
antry and Game Park. 

CANADA WILD GEESE AND THEIR GOSLINGS— 
A limited number for sale now — the surest way to start 
breeding this species. We are the oldest and largest 
breeders of Canadas in this country. Black and White 
Swans.Wild Ducks, etc., for sale. WHEALTON WATER 
FOWL FARMS, Chincoteague Island. Va. 

GOLDEN PHEASANT COCKS, IN FULL PLUM- 

age, six dollars each. P. SCH WEH M, 4219-4th Street, 

N. E., Seattle, Wash. it 

WANTED— WHITE PEAFOWL, EITHER SEX. 
Pied Peafowl, Soemmerring, Cheer, Hoki and German 
Peacock Pheasants, Ruffed Grouse, and White Squirrels. 
Also Swinhoes; state price and number. R. A. CHILES 
& CO., Mt. Sterling, Ky. 

Pheasants Wanted 

WANTED. ELLIOTT, MIKADO, SATYR, TRAGOPAN 

and Linneated Pheasants. Mature birds only. 
Write A. J. MERLE, Alameda, Cal. qt 

WANTED-200 PHEASANTS FOR FALL SHOOTING. 

Delivery any time before Nov. 15. All cocks or part 

bens. State lowest price. Cash with order. Shooting 

On''. Tare GAME BRFEDER. 150 N?s^au St., N. Y. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game B eeder or sigrn your letters: "Yours for More Game.' 



32 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Notice to Purchasers. 

Purchasers can rely upon advertisers in The Game Breeder. The Game Conservation 
Society has a committee known as the Game Guild, which investigates complaints promptly 
and insists upon fair dealing under a penalty of dismissal from membership and the loss of the 
right to advertise in the magazine. There are very few complaints in a year, for the most 
part due to shipments of eggs. These have been Uniformly adjusted to the satisfaction of the 
seller and purchaser. Any member making a complaint should state that in placing his order 
he mentioned the fact that it was due to an advertisement in The Game Breeder. All mem- 
bers of the Society are urged to buy from those who support the publication by advertising 
in it. 



FOR SALE — PURE MONGOLIAN PHEASANTS. 
liC. W. SIEGLER, Bangor, Wisconsin. 2 t 

CHINESE, RINGNECK AND MONGOLIAN CROSS, 
Cocks $2.00, hens $4.00. Golden and Silver, young cocks 
$3 00, hens *5.00. Golden, old cocks 584.00, hens $6.00. 
Wild geese and ducks. CLASSIC LAKE WILD FOWL 
FARM, Manzanita, Oregon. 3t 

THE BLACK SIBERIAN HARE IS OF ENORMOUS 
size. It grows faster, matures and breeds earlier than 
any other rabbit, but best of all is its delicious meat and 
beautiful fur. Write for information and prices. 
SIBERIAN FUR FARM, Hamilton, Canada. 6t 



GLENWOOD PHEASANTRIES, HADLYME, CONN. 

Ringneck phaesant eggs for sale. Price $25.00 per 100. 

R. K. McPHAIL. 4 t 



FOODS 



WILD DUCK FOODS 

Wild duck food plants, and seed. Wild Celery, Sago 
Pond Weed, Widgeon grass, Red head grass, Chara 
and other kinds. 

There are hundreds of thousands of acres of water 
marshes where these, the best of duck foods, will grow 
and hold the game. Write and learn how to do it. 
WHITE'S GAME PRESERVE, Waterlily, N. C. 
Currituck Sound. 



ACORNS 

An excellent food for deer, pheasants and wild ducks. 
I can supply acorns by the bushel or in large lots. 
Write for prices, including shipping charges. W. R. 
McLEAN, R. F. D., Eagle Springs, North Carolina. 



BOOKS 



'D/^v/^l^'O Fox Hunters, Trappers, Fur Traders, 

■Dv-/vyi\.kJ Taxidermists, Fishermen, Sportsmen, 
Campers, Prospectors, Fur Farmers, Ginseng and Golden 
Seal Growers, etc. By A. R. Harding. Price 60 cents 
each. THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. 



GAMEKEEPERS 



WISH CHANGE OF POSITION AS POULTRY 

man or gamekeeper by married man. No children. 

Life experience, four years at present position, excellent 

references. L. W. WERTHEIM, Hillsboro, N. C. It 

GAMEKEEPER — POSITION WANTED. SKILLED 
gamekeeper with good references desires position. 
WM. STRANG, 2147 Blackrock Ave., Unionport, N. Y. 

WANTED — POSITION AS MANAGER ON GAME 
farm or shooting preserve. Long experience raising 
game birds. Understand raising and training shooting 
dogs, and trapping vermin. A S. B., care of Game 
Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York, N. Y. 



WANTED. SITUATION AS GAMEKEEPER. Ex- 
perienced on game rearing and dog training. Married. 
Apply H. care of THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau 
St., New York. 

GAMEKEEPER DESIRES SITUATION, THOR- 

oughly understands all duties, etc. Best references 

from Europe and this country. M. J. F., care of The 

Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York City. 4t 

WANTED SITUATION— A GAMEKEEPER FAMIL- 
iar with pheasant and poultry rearing. I have also had 
experience in general farming and can plan the planting 
for game. BRUCE LANE, care of Game Breeder, 150 
Nassau St., New York. 6t 

GAMEKEEPER.— SITUATION WANTED. — I can 

furnish good English and American references. 
Thoroughly understand all the duties of a Game- 
keeper ; can rear thousands* of birds, and train 
dogs, &c. I understand trapping and the control 
of vermin, and wish to get a place now so I can 
prepare it for breeding on a large scale next spring. 
Address J. H., care of The Game Breeder, 150 
Nassau Street, New York. 



MISCELLANEOUS 



200 PHEASANTS WANTED -WILL TAKE EQUAL 
number of cocks and hens. Send prices and age ot birds. 
R. A. MAXWELL, care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau 
Street, New York. 

RINGNECK PHEASANTS, $5.00 A PAIR. GOLDENS, 
$10.00 a pair. Guaranteed strong and in the pint of con- 
dition for Spring breeding. Order now as I have a limited 
supply of birds. LILLIAN E. GALLUP, 2209 Ogden, 
Omaha, Nebraska. it 

REGISTERED AND PEDIGREED BLACK FOXES 
RUGGED PUPS BORN IN NATURAL CONDITIONS 
ON MOUNTAIN RANCH. GUARANTEED TO 
BREED EVERY ONE OF OUR EIGHT FEMALES 
WHELPED THIS SPRING. WRITE FOR RECORDS. 
BOARSTONE MOUNTAIN FOX RANCH, ONAWA, 
MAINE. 

"THE RANCH BRED FOX," THE BEST BOOK 
published on Fox farming. Tells all about this wonderful 
industry. Price 25c, postpaid. THE BLACK FOX 
MAGAZINE, 15 Whitehall St., New York. 



ALL GAME BREEDERS SHOULD REMEMBER 

that Meal Worms are just as choice a food for the old 
birds as for the young; of course, as a rule, they are not 
fed to the old because they will live without them, except 
occasionally by a man of means, who does not believe in 
depriving his birds of an occasional luxury. However, all 
breeders should keep on hand a pan or two of meal worms, 
to feed to their old birds when a little out of sorts, at 
moulting time or when being dosed with drugs. Meal 
worms are an excellent tonic, because a natural insect food. 
500 at $1.00. 1,000 at $1.50, 5.000 at $500. All express pre- 
paid. C. B. KERN, 10 East Main Street, Mount Joy, 
Pennsylvania. It 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



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Largest ^Manufacturers of Firearms and Ammunition in the Vv orld 
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TH Er 



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VOL.^XIV.' 



NOVEMBER, 1918 




The- Object op this magazine- is 
to Make- North America the 5iggest 
Game Producing Country in the World 




ANOTHER PROCLAMATION B\ THE PRESIDENT. 

NOT "OTHERWISE THAN BY SHOOTING" 

Our objection to the regulation providing that birds produced must 
be taken "otherwise than by snooting" has brought results. We 
were told by the Survey that it had the right to make regulations. 
But the answer that the regulations must be reasonable; that they 
must not interfere with our readers and that they must not be in 
violation of Sec. 12 of the law left no ground for the regulation and 
it has departed. 

Sec. 2 of Regulation 8 as Proclaimed by the 
President now reads as follows : 

"Migratory water fowl, except the birds taken 
under paragraph 1 of this regulation (birds 
taken for breeding stock) , MAY BE KILLED 
BY SHOOTING only during the open season 
for waterfowl." 

We take great pleasure in praising the Survey for its prompt action. 
We always like to see governmental matters as well as others 
speeded up. We always find more pleasure in praising the right 
than in denouncing the wrong, and in the 'future we suggest that 
when the Survey proposes to take any action relating to Game 
Breeders that it consult headquarters first — 150 Nassau St., N. Y., 
will reach us. We do not approve of U. S. criminal laws being made 
overnight in a back room in the Woolworth Building, N. Y., especially 
when by one fell swoop they destroy all the customers of the game 
farmers. We shall be glad to look over any proposed criminal laws 
before they are made and in this way we may save some time for 
the President, who will not be called on to Proclaim so often. 




Published Monthly. Entered as ^econd-clas^ matter, July 9, 1915, at the Post Office, 
New York City, New York, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 



PUBLISHED BY 

THE GAME- CONSERVATION SOCIETY, Inc. 

NEW YORK CITY U.S.A f.p ?*<"J -'S 



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The Feeding of Sporting Dogs 

Every Gamekeeper knows 
and appreciated the diffi- 
culty of bringing the dogs 
up to "top notch" in the 
matter of health, especial- 
ly as the sporting season 
hoves in sight. Sporting 
dogs have to undertake 
difficult and exacting 
work necessitating a great 
expenditure of strength 
and vitality. Hence their 
feeding demands experience, judgment and consideration in selecting 
the best foods to sustain them and the exclusive use of those foods only. 

Sporting Dogs can be made capable of long- 
sustained effort by liberally feeding them with 

Spratt's Dog Cakes 

which are now recognized in all sporting circles as the Food par excel- 
lence for keeping dogs up to standard fitness. Dogs fed on Spratt's Biscuits 
work better, behave better, live longer and are more reliable then those 
trained on any other foods. 

SPRATT'S DOG CAKES prevent dogs suffering 
from overstrain by providing 

A RESERVE STOCK OP VITALITY 

— just what so many dogs lack at the time when they need it most. 

Are you Feeding your Dogs on Spratt's? 

If you are not, and wish to prove their value in a practical 
way, we will send you samples free. 

"DOG CULTURE" mailed on receipt of 2 cent stamp. 
" PHEASANT CULTURE," price 25 cents. 
"POULTRY CULTURE" 10 cents. 

Spratt's Patent, Ltd. 

Newark, N. J. San Francisco. St. Louis. Cleveland. Montreal. 

Factory also in London, England. 



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THE GAME BREEDER 



33 



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84 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Now is the Time. 

Now is the time to send advertise- 
ments of deer, game birds and eggs to 
The Game Breeder. People have learned 
to place their orders early and we are 
so busy and so short of help that we 
have little time or ability to solicit adver- 
tising. Practically all we have comes 
without solicitation. 



All owners of game ranches and shoots 
should remember that they should buy 
only from . those who advertise in The 
Game Breeder. 



STATEMENT OF THE OWNERSHIP. MAN- 
AGEMENT, CIRCULATION. ETC., REQUIRED BY 
THE ACT OF CONGRESS OF AUGUST 24, 1912, 
of THE GAME BREEDER, published monthly at 
New York, N. Y., for October 1, 1918. 
State of New York, County of New York, ss. : 

Before me, a notary public in and for the State and 
county aforesaid, personally appeared D. W. Hunting- 
ton, who, having been duly sworn according to law, 
deposes and says that he is the editor of the Game 
Breeder and that the following is, to the best of his 
knowledge . and belief, a true statement of the owner- 
ship, management, etc., of the aforesaid publication 
for the date shown in the above caption, required by 
the Act of August 24, 1912, embodied in section 443, 
Postal Laws and Regulations, printed on the reverse 
of this form, to wit: 1. That the names and addresses 
of the publisher, editor, managing- ~'Htor, and busi- 
ness managers are: Publisher, The uame Conserva- 
tion Society, Inc., 150 Nassau St., New York, N. Y.; 
Editor, D. W. Huntington, 150 Nassau St., New York, 
N. Y.; Managing Editor, none; Business Managers, 
The Game Conservation Society, Inc., 150 Nassau 
St., New York, N. Y.. 2. That the owners are: 
The Game Conservation Society, Inc., 150 Nassau 
St., New York, N. Y.; Stockholders: C. B. Davis, 
Grantwood, N. J., A. A. Hill (Deceased), F. R. Feix- 
otto, 55 John St., New York, N. Y.; John C. Hunting- 
ton, 150 Nassau St., New York, N. Y. (at present 
U. S. Ship Anniston, in service) ; D. W. Huntington, 
150 Nassau St., New York. N. Y.; Dwight W. Hunt- 
ington, 2nd (at present U. S. A., France); H. H. 
Shannon, Great Neck Station, New York. 3. That the 
known bondholders, mortgagees, and other security 
holders owning or holding 1 per cent or more of total 
amount of bonds, mortgages, or other securities are: 
None. 4. That the two paragraphs next above, giving 
the names of the owners, stockholders, and security 
holders, if any, contain not only the list of stock- 
holders and security holders as they appear upon the 
books of the company but also, in cases where the 
stockholder or security holder appears upon the books 
of the company as trustee or in any other fiduciary 
relation, the name of the person or corporation for 
whom such trustee is acting, is given; also that the 
said two paragraphs contain statements embracing 
affiant's full knowledge and belief as to the circum- 
stances and conditions under which stockholders and 
security holders who do not appear upon the books 
of the company as trustees, hold stock and securi- 
ties in a capacity other than that of a bona fide 
owner; and this affiant has no reason to believe that 
any other person, association, or corporation has any 
interest direct or indirect in the said -stock, bonds, or 
other securities than as so stated by him. 

D. W. Huntington, Editor. 
Sworn to and subscribed before me this 15th day 
of October, 1918. George F. Bentley, Notary Public 
(102) New York County. (My commission expires 
March 30th, 1920.) (SEAL.) 



The Hawk is Fastest Flier and Crow 
the Slowest. 

By the Statistician. 

While there is considerable variation 
in the speed of flight of game birds, the 
table below may be taken as the most 
accurate approximation of the compara- 
tive speed at which the better known wild 
birds fly. 

The crow may be taken as an example 
of the slower flying bird, with a rate of 
35 to 45 feet a second, and with an aver- 
age speed of 45 miles an hour, while 
many species of hawks attain the re- 
markably fast speed of 200 feet a second. 

Here is the table showing the average 
speed in flight: 

Feet per Aver- 
Bird. Second. age. 

Quail 65 to 85 75 

Ruffed Grouse 60 to 90 75 

Snipe 50 to 70 65 

Mallard 55 to 90 75 

Wood Duck 70 to 90 80 

Teal 120 to 140 130 

Canvasback 130 to 160 145 

Canada Geese 100 to 120 110 

Red Head 110 to 130 120 

It may be said that if ducks are scared 
they can reach maximum speed at will, 
and this sprinting flight is usually what 
the gunner has to make allowance for. 

On the other hand, many wildfowl are 
jumped and killed while hovering over 
decoys and moving slowly, and birds like 
snipe and quail are often killed before 
they have attained full speed. 

Upland birds are not often shot while 
passing the gun at right angles, but going 
straight away, quartering or twisting. — 
National Sports Syndicate. 



Good Advice. 

The fact that an advertiser is tem- 
porarily Oversold should not induce him 
to abandon his advertising or give up his 
customers. The ad should be left stand- 
ing and the advertisers should offer to 
procure the stock needed. It pays to 
keep in touch and it also pays to help The 
Game Breeder. 

Two excellent keepers write that they 
are much pleased with the situations 
they have just obtained through adver- 
tisements in The Game Breeder. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



35 



Hollow Point .22's— 

Best For Exterminating Vermin 



REMINGTON 
UMC 



REMINGTON 
UMC 



The value of the hollow point 

cartridge to the game breeder lies 

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gophers, rats, weasels and ground 

squirrels cannot escape to die, 
wounded, in holes or cover when squarely hit with hollow point 
bullets. A hit means a kill in almost every case. 

Remington UMC metallic ammunition has a world-wide reputation 
for accuracy and dependability. From the large caliber cartridges 
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.25 Stevens Short and .25 Stevens are made in Black Powder only. 



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In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



36 



THE GAME BREEDER 






PARKER Guns are made by gun experts. The 
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CONTENTS 

Survey of the Field 

Importations of Bobwhite Quail - 

A New Food Industy 

Advertise Now to Ease Period of Reconstruction 

Breeding The 'Wild Turkey - 

Notes from the Game Farms and Preserves 

Editorials — The Breakfast Hyphen — Importation of Mexican Quail — Game Breeding 
A Good Use for War Profit. 



Hon. J. Quincy Ward 

The Independent 

Geo. Frank Lord 

Gilbert J. Johnson 

- By Our Readers 



THREE THOUSAND 

Chinese-Mongolian Ringneck Pheasants 

FALL DELIVERY 
Full Wing, Healthy, Hardy Birds 

Reeves, Lady Amherst, Golden, 
Silver, Pure Mongolian 

Japanese Silkies, Buff Cochin Bantams 

New Zealand Red Rabbits, Breeding Stock $3.50 Each, Young $2 

We are Breeders Exclusively, and nothing leaves our 
farm that is not right in every particular. 



MARMOT PHEASANTRY 

Member of The Game Guild 
MARMOT, OREGON 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game.' 






T h< : Game Breeder 



VOLUME XIV 



NOVEMBER, J9J8 
SURVEY OF THE FIELD. 



NUMBER 2 



Wanted Prairie Chickens and Ruffed 
Grouse. 

A number of readers of The Game 
Breeder wish to procure prairie grouse, 
sharp-tailed grouse and ruffed grouse. 
Any reader who can furnish these birds 
or their eggs or can tell us where to 
procure them is requested to write to 
The Game Breeder. 

A Correction. 

At the meeting of the State game offi- 
cers Mr. Burnham stated that The Game 
Breeder in quoting the statement that 
"we don't want any preserves or the sale 
of game which goes with them'' misrep- 
resented him. He said this statement 
was only made at a hearing before the 
District of Columbia committee. We 
promised to print anything he had to say 
on the first page of The Game Breeder. 
If this does not fully cover the subject 
we will give prominence to a letter fur- 
ther explaining just what he does want. 

What the people want is expressed 
forcibly in section 12 of the Migratory 
Bird Law which distinctly says there 
shall be no further interference with 
the game breeding industry. Our read- 
ers will remember our letter addressed 
to all of the Congressmen when we were 
asked to write to our Congressmen fa- 
voring the enactment of the Migratory 
Bill. We published this letter calling 
for the amendment and we have reason 
to believe that many of our readers took 
the trouble to write to their Congress- 
men. At all events section 12 suits them 
and us. 

More Game and Fewer Game Laws. 

In a bulletin issued by the U. S. De- 
partment of Agriculture we are told that 



"Fewer game laws were enacted in 1918 
than in any year since 1900 — about 50 
laws having been passed. States on the 
honor roll are Kentucky, Georgia and 
Mississippi. No game laws were enacted 
in these States. 

Think of it, worthy readers, only 5Q 
new game laws in a year ! Is not this 
a triumph for your cause. Sixty or 
ninety to a State at one time was fash- 
ionable. As the laws decrease in num- 
ber the game has increased rapidly. Far 
more quail were produced on the Ix>ng 
Island Game Breeders Association 
ground than the entire number of new 
game laws for the whole country, and 
the place is only a few months old ! We 
have no hesitation in saying that over 
fifty tons of game have been produced 
by readers of The Game Breeder during 
the time when the 50 new laws were se- 
cured. Since we once helped to produce 
over three tons on one place in a season 
the estimate of 50 tons for the country 
undoubtedly is small. Let us all make a 
drive and see that hundreds of tons of 
game be produced next year. Before 
long game will be considered as a food 
by the Agriculture Department at Wash- 
ington which shows signs of waking up; 
the States which produce the most game 
will be listed just as the States which 
produced the most game laws have been 
listed by the Agriculture Department in 
the past. 

Wrong End First. 

One of our Boston readers wrote that 
those interested in procuring game laws 
always went at the subject wrong end 
first. 

There should, of course, be no charge 
for a license to breed game or any other 
food on a farm. There is, however, a 



38 



THE GAME BREEDER 



good reason why the game dealers in the 
cities and towns should be licensed and 
regulated by the State game departments. 
Game reared on ranches, game farms 
and preserves is easily stolen when it is 
produced in large numbers wild in pro- 
tected fields, which is the best and most 
profitable way to breed many species of 
game. The wild game on public lands 
and waters, which is protected in Amer- 
ica by laws prohibiting its sale, in the 
absence of regulations might easily be 
sent to the dealers in competition with 
the game owned and marketed by breed- 
ers. 

In the older countries any one who 
shoots a game bird owns it after he has 
shot it and can sell it as a matter of 
course. But there are laws in America 
which have been upheld by the courts 
which provide that game taken legally 
on public lands and waters does not be- 
long to the one taking it but remains the 
property of the State to the extent that 
the State can say what disposition can 
be made of it. The decision of the 
United States Supreme Court upholding 
laws prohibiting the sale of game legally 
taken was rendered by a majority of the 
judges, not all being present, and some 
able dissenting opinions were rendered. 
But so long as the decision (in Geer vs. 
Connecticut) remains unreversed it 
would seem to be moi"e important that 
the dealers be licensed and regulated in 
America than it is in other countries 
where the wild fowlers sell their game 
just as our fishermen sell their fish. 

The Form of the License. 

Since the State game officers resolved 
at their recent meeting that all of the 
States which had not done so should 
enact laws permitting game farmers to 
sell their food it would be advisable to 
consider the licensing of the dealers so 
that the abundant food supply can be 
marketed from game ranches, farms and 
preserves without danger of game 
stolen from the farms or from the pub- 
lic lands and waters being sold, so long 
at least as it is deemed inadvisable to 
prohibit the sale of public game. We can 
see that it may be advisable to prohibit 



the sale of public game as food until 
such time as the game farms and pre- 
serves supply the markets so abundantly 
that the sale of public game safely can 
be permitted. 

The pawnbrokers and junk dealers are 
licensed and regulated because this is 
necessary to prevent the sale of stolen 
goods. Cigarmakers and dealers and 
the manufacturers of fire-water and 
beer and the retailers of these beverages 
have been licensed and regulated in or- 
der to see that the revenues are paid 
and that "moonshine" be excluded from 
the markets. Straight goods and moon- 
shine are said to be much alike. 

Often we have pointed out that if the 
pawnbrokers and junk dealers who han- 
dle legal jewels and junk, which look 
exactly like stolen goods, can be regu- 
lated and permitted to handle the legit- 
imate, it must be true that those who deal 
in game can be regulated and permitted 
to sell the food from the farms and pre- 
serves. Should a little illegal food be 
sold this only would result in the people 
who are said to own the game getting a 
taste of their property which they can 
not get in some States today. 

The form of the license can be made 
very simple; the charge for the license 
might well be made larger for city deal- 
ers who will handle large amounts than 
for small dealers in the villages who will 
handle smaller amounts. The State 
game departments should have the right 
to cancel licenses upon the conviction of 
a dealer for illegal selling and if it be 
distinctly understood that violations _ of 
the laws are to result in the termination 
of the business of the law-breaker _ it is 
evident that there will be few violations ; 
and by eliminating those who do not 
obey the laws the business soon can be 
regulated as easily as other industries 
which require licenses are. 

Most business men are honest, espe- 
cially when it pays to be honest, and the 
fear that some may violate a law should 
not, of course, prevent a food industry. 
Comparatively little of the land now 
posted against sport can be made to fill 
the markets to overflowing with game 
and, as often we have pointed out, sport 



THE GAME BREEDER 



39 



has nothing to fear from an abundance sold or transported except for propagat- 



of game on the farms which may be 
used to produce game instead of as har- 
bors for birds which are classed as song 
birds. 

The State game departments will be 



ing purposes and then only to a person 
holding a federal permit. 

A permit issued pursuant to paragraph 
2 of regulation 8 will not authorize the 
taking of wild migratory waterfowl for 



far more creditably employed when they any purpose but will authorize the per 



enforce regulations protecting the sales 
of food than they have been in States 
where it was fashionable to raid food 
producers because they had birds or eggs 
for breeding purposes and in States 
where the departments put in their time 
protecting the game song birds against 
all sportsmen. 



A Memorandum. 

The U. S. Biological Survey has issued 
the following memorandum relating to 
permits authorizing traffic in migratory 
waterfowl and their eggs for propagat- 
ing purposes. 

The Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 

July 3, 1918, provides that: 

,f It shall be unlawful to hunt, take, capture 
or kill, attempt to take, capture or kill, 
possess, offer for sale, sell, offer to pur- 
chase, purchase, deliver for shipment, ship, 
cause to be shipped, deliver for transporta- 
tion, transport, cause to be transported, carry 
or cause to be carried by any means what- 
ever, receive for shipment, transportation or 
carriage, or export, at any time or in any 
manner, any migratory bird, included in the 
terms of the convention between the United 
States and Great Britain for the protection 
of migratory birds concluded August sixteenth, 
nineteen hundred and sixteen, or any part, nest 
or egg of any such bird." 

No migratory waterfowl or their eggs 
can be taken, possessed, sold, purchased, 
shipped or transported for propagating 
purposes except as specifically permitted 
by regulation 8 of the Migratory Bird 
Treaty Act Regulations. 

Two forms of permits are provided. 
A permit issued pursuant to paragraph 
1 of regulation 8 will authorize a person 
to take a limited number of wild migra- 
tory waterfowl and their eggs solely for 
propagating purposes in order to form 
the nucleus of a breeding stock or to 
strengthen the strain of the birds he may 
now have on hand. The wild birds so 
taken cannot be killed, nor can they be 



mittee to possess, purchase, sell and 
transport for propagating purposes wild 
waterfowl, their increase and eggs, law- 
fully taken and possessed, to possess, 
purchase, sell, and transport for propa- 
gating purposes migratory waterfowl 
lawfully possessed on July 3, 1918, and 
their increase and eggs ; to kill birds 
raised in domestication and to sell and 
transport their carcasses for food pur- 
poses as provided in said regulation 8. 

Migratory waterfowl lawfully taken 
and possessed under these permits may 
be used and transported for ornamen- 
tal, exhibition, and decoy purposes. 

Forms 279 and 281 furnished by the 
Bureau should be used in applying for 
permits under paragraphs 1 and 2, re- 
spectively. 

Federal permits do not authorize mi- 
gratory birds to be taken, possessed, or 
trafficked in contrary to State laws, and 
all persons are cautioned to comply with 
the provisions of State laws before 
operating under federal permits. 

For further information in regard to 
federal game laws apply to Biological 
Survey, U. S. Department of Agricul- 
ture, Washington, D. C. 

Shooting on Farms and Preserves. 

The Biological Survey writes to our 
readers who ask permits as follows : 
The sample letter was addressed to Mr. 
R. E. Bullock, Scarboro Beach Game 
Farm, Scarboro, Maine. 

Washington, D. C, Oct. 1, 1918. 
Mr. R. E. Bullock, 

Scarboro, Maine. 
Dear Sir — We have your letter of 
September 24 asking to be advised in 
regard to shooting on game farms and 
preserves. 

For your information we take pleasure 
in sending you herewith copy of the 



40 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Migratory Bird Treaty, Act, and Regu- 
lations. We also inclose copy of a cir- 
cular explaining in detail the provisions 
of regulation 8 of the Migratory Bird 
Treaty Act Regulations governing the 
possession and traffic in migratory 
waterfowl for propagating and commer- 
cial purposes, etc. 

In this connection we may add that 
we have recommended an amendment of 
the regulations which, if adopted, will 
permit migratory waterfowl raised in 
domestication to be killed by shooting 
during the respective open seasons for 
hunting migratory waterfowl but it will 
be sometime before final action has been 
taken on this recommendation. The 
present regulations, of course, will re- 
main in full force and effect until 
amended. 

Very truly yours, 

W. C. Henderson, 
Acting Chief of Bureau. 

Inclosure 8406. 

An Illegal Regulation. 

Since the regulation prohibiting the 
shooting of game by game preservers is 
in violation of section 12 of the Migra- 
tory Bird Law it cannot be executed and 
was void the moment it was made. 
There is the best legal authority for this 
statement and we are glad to learn that 
the Survey "has recommended an 
amendment of the regulations which, if 
adopted, will permit migratory water- 
fowl raised in domestication to be killed 
by shooting during the respective open 
seasons for hunting migratory water- 
fowl." It is amusing to read: "But it 
will be sometime before final action has 
been taken on this recommendation.'' 

The concluding sentence in the letter 
that "the present regulations, of course, 
will remain in full force and effect until 
amended," is not important since a reg- 
ulation in violation of law is void as we 
have observed and cannot remain in full 
force on that account. We should think 
th2 Survey would speed up the repeal if 
it takes any interest in food production. 

We are a little curious to know to 
whom the amendment was "recom- 
mended." As we understand the matter 



the regulation under discussion was 
made in an office in the Woolworth 
Building in New York, a very small co- 
terie of criminal lawmakers being pres- 
ent (three to be exact). If any one 
should be arrested for shooting his ducks 
possibly the court may inquire how reg- 
ulations in violation of law are made. 
Our committee for the defense of food 
producers always is mobilized. 

A Suggestion. 

We would respectfully suggest that 
any reputable game breeder should be 
permitted to shoot and sell, if he wishes 
to sell, the number of birds reared on his 
ranch. Most breeders are reputable and 
are willing to shoot and sell only the 
number of birds produced. It should not 
be difficult to regulate any breeder sus- 
pected of exceeding the bag limit sug- 
gested, and if necessary to put him out 
of business. It is a poor plan to prohibit 
the innocent food producer for fear that 
a guilty man may escape. Because some 
chickens are stolen we do not prohibit 
the poultry industry. 



Mr. Pratt is fortunate in having an 
able fish culturist, Mr. Jno. W. Titcomb, 
who at one time was employed by the U. 
S. Bureau of Fisheries, and who later 
was the Game and Fish Commissioner of 
Vermont. The U. S. Bureau of Fish- 
eries believes in and encourages the pro- 
duction of fish for food and for sport 
in private waters and gives fish as well 
as advice to those who wish to produce 
the desirable foods. It is only recently 
that the New York laws have been 
amended so as to permit the sale of trout 
by the producers. No good reason can 
be assigned why any one who produces 
any kind of fish for food should not sell 
them in the markets. For a long time 
even the excellent trout was kept out of 
the markets and all inducements to pro- 
duce trout were strangled by fish laws 
quite similar to those which have nearly 
resulted in the extermination of our 
quail, grouse, wood duck, woodcock and 
some other species which should be 
abundant and cheap foods during long 
open seasons. 



THE GAME BREEDER 41 



IMPORTATIONS OF BOBWHITE QUAIL. 

By Hon. J. Quincy Ward, 
Executive Agent of the Kentucky Game and Fish Commission. 

To the lovers of birds from the es- with pleasure the vividness, the joy given 
thetic point of view, and especially the me when viewing the trim and business- 
sportsmen, the casual mention of bob- like lines of his muzzle loading fowling 
white arouses sweet memories that bless piece, and could I wield the brush of an 
and burn. Osthaus I am sure I could reproduce 

As a hunter, fisherman and trapper in upon canvas even to the minutest detail 

boyhood, I had occasion to learn some- his magnificent lemon-and-white pointer 

thing of the remnants of wild life that dog, his clean, bony head, rich brown 

once abounded in the locality where I eyes and rippling muscles working in 

was born and reared, a county of the perfect accord beneath his silken coat 

far-famed "Blue Grass" section of Ken- caused us to know intuitively that he 

tucky. It was there that the riotous was the possessor of that indescribable 

reproduction of the alluvial soil nour- something, known as class, which would 

ished and caressed the summer's son, and on the morrow lead his followers un- 

showers filtering through the foliage of erringly to that hidden brown bevy that 

magnificent hardwood, checked by win- when flushed would go hurtling through 

ter, created a rendezvous par excellence the frosty air seeking to escape the 

for game and birds of all kinds. Here leaden hail to gain their well known co- 

they abounded in such quantities and verts of safety. 

qualities that the Indians made annual It was in this same territory years 

pilgrimages to supply their winter's lar- afterwards at twilight that I heard the 

der. call once heard by the sportsmen never 

The Indians' abbreviated description forgotten (here call) the assembly call 
of this fertile land, the hunter's paradise of bobwhite. I wish that every hunter 
filtered to the population of the east, when he hears this call would recognize 
stimulating men like Boone and Crock- it at twilight as the "Marsellaise" and 
ett, Lewis and Clark, to dedicate their a t dawn the "Star Spangled Banner" the 
lives to the winning of the west. It was call of the wild, the brave and the free, 
in this locality that the tide of civiliza- for then hunters worthy of the title 
tion trending ever westward broke "sportsmen" would consider it taps to 
through the then seeming impregnable his day's hunt and he would not take 
barrier of the Appalachian Mountains, advantage of this call to increase his bag. 
eddied and left in its wake the seed de- Possibly the memory of this call, min- 
posit of men endowed with every at- glecl with the memory of. the swish of 
tribute necessary to win the land for the wild fowls' wings at eventide was 
civilization. The history created by their an inspiration to those great public- 
efforts left to posterity a record of which spirited statesmen, that caused them to 
Kentuckians are justly proud as rich write on the Federal statutes the edict, 
with deeds of courage and daring, sen- "That before sunrise and after sunset, 
timent and romance as the soil that sus- Thou shalt not kill," and going further 
tained and nourished them. guaranteed to the migratory birds that 

It was to this land that came in my after they had run the gauntlet of the 
childhood, a beloved uncle to visit again hunters on their trip to the Southland, 
the country of his youth, to mingle with that they might in peace and safety re- 
loved ones and spend a few days of well turn through the unchartered sea of air 
earned vacation hunting bobwhite quail, to the lands which have not yet suffered 
which was then almost virgin cover for of civilization, there in peace to repro- 
this splendid game bird. I remember duce their kind for the benefit of men. 



42 



THE GAME BREEDER 



The bobwhite, however, is not to a 
noticeable degree endowed with migra- 
tory habits, and is therefore dependent 
upon civilization for his sustenance and 
upon man for his protection. The press- 
ing hand of husbandry has destroyed the 
coverts that gave them shelter when 
pursued, and at the same time has ex- 
posed his home to the rigors of winter, 
he is therefore, the prey of his natural 
enemies, combined with the elements 
until the places that knew him shall 
know him no more forever, unless the 
same hand that destroyed reproduces the 
birds and the conditions which he de- 
mands. 

As no State within our borders per- 
mits exportation even for propagation 
purposes, it is necessary to look to for- 
eign lands for breeding stock. Northern 
Mexico has a sufficient supply of bob- 
white quail to meet the demands of the 
present if the importations are success- 
fully handled. 

As business men and sportsmen you 
ask first, "How will it be managed," 
second, "What is the cost," third, "Will 
it pay?'' The Federal Government does 
not permit the entry of injurious, dis- 
eased birds or animals, and it is neces- 
sary to secure from the Federal authori- 
ties permits for the entry of quail. From 
1916 to April, 1918, the Government is- 
sued permits for the importation of 
66,462 quail from Mexico, of which 
46,019 were released from quarantine 
and shipped by importers to purchasers 
throughout the United States, and to 
give an idea as to the demand, I am ad- 
vised by the importers that they do not 
fill half of their orders. The shipments 
were made from California to Pennsyl- 
vania, from Wisconsin to Florida. 

The average cost was $18 per dozen 
or $1.50 each F. O. B. point of entry, 
which means an expenditure for the 
three seasons for birds, not including 
cost of transportation, feed, etc., of 
$69,028.50. 

The importers have given me their sin- 
cere and hearty co-operation, and upon 
request furnished me a list giving the 
name of the purchasers, post office ad- 
dress, number of birds sold, date of 



shipment, which list enabled me to com- 
municate directly with the purchasers 
and to learn from them direct result of 
their efforts. I am pleased to publicly 
commend the importers and to express 
my gratefulness for their assistance and 
courtesy, as I know well that it is their 
desire, purpose and effort to conduct 
their business at a financial sacrifice to 
make the importations successful. While 
this information was requested with the 
understanding that it would be treated as 
confidential, I am pleased to report that 
it was given without restriction. The 
date is intact and if needed can be fur- 
nished to the proper authorities, knowing 
that it would be used for the greatest 
good to the greatest numbers. 

The questionnaires were responded to 
by 35 purchasers, and covered 16,170 
birds. 

A careful checking shows less than 
.018 per cent of the birds died in transit, 
and the average journey therefor was 
four days; however, where birds were 
held in captivity for spring liberation the 
loss was much greater. In some in- 
stances the entire shipment was lost — 
on the other hand, birds that were lib- 
erated as soon, or shortly after receipt, 
are reported to have survived, mated and 
reproduced to the satisfaction of the 
purchaser. 

While many of the birds that died 
were examined by Federal and State 
authorities, and while evidence of quail 
disease was found in some cases, and 
bird pox in many, the result of the diag- 
nosis is not sufficiently enlightening to 
be of benefit. The germ that causes the 
quail disease has never been isolated or 
the disease reproduced by inoculating 
other birds. Bird pox is possibly caused 
bv injuries incident to capture and con- 
finement. 

The consensus of opinion of men 
whose veracity, knowledge and experi- 
ence cannot be questioned, is that where 
bobwhite quail are held in captivity un- 
der sanitary conditions that death is due 
to a change of diet, that is from a diet 
composed of green food and insect life 
to dry grain ; if it is not the direct cause 
of death it is sufficient cause for many 






THE GAME BREEDER 



43 



complications. This change is possibly 
the cause of the death of Mexican quail, 
for due to temperate climate their diet 
necessarily is composed of green food 
and insect life in abundance. I am satis- 
fied that this is the principal cause of 
death, for I have held bobwhite quail 
taken in December and January after 
green food and insect life had disap- 
peared when their crops showed that 
they were fed on grain and weed seeds 
and held them to April with a loss of 
less than two per cent. 

I have also found by experience that 
bobwhite quail when confined in large 
open pens are easily alarmed and flush 
quickly, even where cropped they kill 
themselves when in panic, and those un- 
injured are so badly scared that they do 
not feed properly for several days. It 
therefore seems best to recommend that 
the birds be held in small crates in which 
they are to be shipped, as under such 
conditions their coops can be kept in a 
sanitary condition, the food can be reg- 
ulated to the proper amount, sick, dead 
and injured birds can be removed with- 
out alarming many, and they would not 
have to be rehandled immediately before 
shipping. 

When captured or transferred to hold 
crates, males should be confined in one 
crate or compartment and females in an- 
other, and especially should this arrange- 
ment be followed where shipments are 
to consist of four dozen, and as most 
parties ordering birds desire them 
equally divided as to sex, the compart- 
ments could be kept to the standard 
number, thereby eliminating mistakes, 
excitement of birds, and the keeping of 
records. 

First, I would suggest and recommend 
that the Federal Government secure, pos- 
sibly with the co-operation of State Com- 
missions, the services of the ablest 
pathologists, sending them to the locali- 
ties from which the birds are to be 
trapped, and by careful examination to 
determine if disease exists in their nat- 
ural habitat, and if so to prohibit their 
importation until they can be found in a 
healthy condition. These representatives 
of the Government should be given au- 



thority as to the manner in which and 
the length of time the birds should be 
held in quarantine at the point of entry. 
The Government officials should look 
after the birds, or at least some of them 
after they reach their destination and 
provide that every purchaser of the birds 
should before liberation band them or 
mark them with some distinguishing 
mark in order that they might be cap- 
tured or killed under orders and exam- 
ined by Government officials, as by such 
procedure the health and general con- 
dition of the specimens could be deter- 
mined. There are Government and 
State reservations upon which the birds 
could be liberated, protected and the re- 
sults of their planting quickly deter- 
mined. 

Second, I would recommend that no 
immature birds be entered at anv time, 
but the regulations should be amended 
to permit the entry of birds from No- 
vember 15 to April 15. Should such 
regulations be adopted, no birds should 
be sent north of the Mason and Dixon 
line before March 1. Such regulations 
would permit Southern purchasers to 
purchase and liberate their birds in the 
early fall. The Northern purchasers 
could receive their birds after March 1, 
when the possibilities for saving them 
would be very great. 

It is possible that where disease is 
prevalent, by properly conducted re- 
search, to isolate the germ and find the 
remedy therefor. 

I wish to call your attention to the 
fact that the importers and exporters of 
live stock from Mexico and Southern 
Texas to the United States and from the 
United States, in the beginning experi- 
enced the same difficulties and a worse 
loss than did the importers of quail, but 
after experiments the Government ex- 
perts solved the problems and the im- 
portations and exportations are today 
as successfully made as are the move- 
ments from one township to another in 
the same locality. 

The Government should determine and 
announce at the earliest possible date of 
importations, conditions giving the im- 
porters and purchasers time to arrange 






44 



THE GAME BREEDER 



their plans as business men. Unless ligent effort be made to remedy the con- 
some of these recommendations are fob ditions, importations should be prohib- 
lowed and an earnest, sincere and intel- ited. 



A NEW FOOD INDUSTRY, 

(We wonder if our readers can guess who wrote this article for the Independent.) 



The United States Congress has just 
enacted a law which promises to be 
of great economic importance to all of 
the people. I believe, if this law can 
be properly executed, every one soon 
can obtain all the wild ducks he can 
possibly eat at prices surprisingly small. 

The law referred to is known as the 
Migratory Bird Law. This gives the 
Secretary of Agriculture the power to 
make regulations governing the taking of 
wild ducks, geese, woodcock, snipe and 
the other edible migrants. Section 12 
of the new law is important, since it 
provides that nothing in the law shall 
be construed to prevent the breeding of 
game on game farms and preserves and 
the sale of the game so bred for the 
purpose of increasing the food supply. 
In this section a rapidly growing food 
producing industry is recognized and 
protected by the Congress. 

It cannot be denied that in America 
a prejudice has existed against the sale 
of game. This prejudice was due in a 
measure to the opinion of people inter- 
ested in birds that the sale of game was 
a great inducement to the killing of 
game. The opinion seemed to be well 
founded. A big mistake, however, was 
made in legislating upon this subject 
when the fact was overlooked that the 
stopping of the sale of the food must 
necessarily put an end to the produc- 
tion of the food. The wrongs and hard- 
ships created by laws regulating sport 
were discussed for the first time in an 
article in The Independent, which was 
followed, at the request of the editor, 
by a series of articles elaborating the 
subject. Two of the articles were de- 
voted to the subject of popular preju- 
dice which, here as elsewhere, seems to 
be wrong. 



After the appearance of these articles 
many States soon enacted laws permit- 
ting and regulating the production of 
wild ducks and certain other species of 
game and the markets undoubtedly 
would be full of wild ducks and some 
other game birds today provided the 
same encouragement could have been 
given to game breeding by State and 
national officers which has been given to 
the producers of other new foods. One 
big difficulty which remained was that 
the law permitting game breeding did 
not permit the taking of wild birds for 
breeding stock and eggs to be used for 
propagation on the game farms and pre- 
serves. 

The laws in many States, absurd as it 
may seem, Only permitted the breeding 
for profit of one or two species of ducks 
and the imported pheasants, which least 
need the breeders' attention because they 
are in no danger of extinction. 

Hundreds of thousands of pheasants 
and mallards are now produced an- 
nually and the numbers are increasing 
rapidly since people are beginning to 
learn that it is more profitable to have 
birds whose eggs sell for $25 per hun- 
dred in large lots than it is to have birds 
whose eggs sell for from $3 to $5 per 
hundred. The wild ducks and the 
pheasants when sold alive bring better 
prices than poultry and the birds can 
be reared by those who know how, in an 
inexpensive manner. In safe fields and 
marshes, for example, they can be 
reared in a semi-wild state and will pro- 
cure much of their food from the land 
and water, one meal a day being amply 
sufficient to hold them until the harvest 
time or shooting time. A few laws hu- 
morously require the game to be killed 
"otherwise than by shooting." Darwin 



THE GAME BREEDER 45 

pointed out long ago that shooting was a the markets are overstocked, and always 

factor in inducing production. the prices are surprisingly small. The 

The Secretary of Agriculture now has reason is that sport pays a part of the 

full power to permit the trapping of all cost of production. Game always is so 

species of wild fowl for breeding pur- plentiful that wildfowlers, or market 

poses and the taking of eggs for propa- gunners as we say, are permitted to shoot 

gation. Already he has made a most and sell all the wild fowl they can from 

liberal regulation providing for simple public waters and saltings, 

permits to take any number of eggs or The game has vanished rapidly from 

birds and permitting their sale for prop- agricultural regions because it does not 

agation purposes. The regulations fur- pay to have it on the farms. In every 

ther provide that those who obtain breed- country excepting America it is a farm 

ing stock and eggs may sell the birds asset. It seems almost amusing to think 

they produce in the markets as food. that sport has claimed to own the game 

Every one knows that the prices of on the farms which it does not own, and 

game are high and the result of high the reason for the disaster to wild crea- 

prices usually results in a liberal and tures where no one looks after them 

often in an overproduction. The mak- properly is evident. The game has been 

ing of game contraband in the markets actually exterminated on the vast areas 

was a poor way to cause an abundance, in the agricultural regions. The owners 

The liberal policy of permitting every of farms have drained the wet places 

one to obtain breeding stocks and eggs putting an end to the ducks, and by the 

which has been adopted by the Secre- close tillage of fields and the pasturing 

tary of Agriculture should result in a ' of cattle, the lands have been made un- 

great stimulus to the game breeding in- safe and uninhabitable for upland game, 

dustry, which has made an excellent In some States the few remaining quail 

start notwithstanding the many legal have been classed as song birds and they 

obstacles which were created in the ef- are protected by law for terms of years 

fort to preserve and protect the wild or forever. The important matter from 

game which is said to belong to the an economic point of view is that in 

State because it has no other owner. countries where the game laws are 

Dr. C. Hart Merriam, who was the founded on scientific principles, good: 

distinguished head of the United States business sense and a due regard for the 

Bureau of Biological Survey for many natural laws governing the increase and 

years, in a letter to the writer said there decrease of species, the game becomes 

were large areas in the United States quickly a great food supply for all of the 

suitable for game breeding and strongly people who are said to own it. Instead 

endorsed the idea that the production of the shooting being only for the rich, 

of game should be encouraged and not as those say who wish to excite preju- 

prevented by laws. It is largely due to dice, it is well known that the market 

The Independent that a great legal re- gunners can shoot, trap and sell game 

form has been accomplished and that with as much freedom as our fishermen 

the production of valuable foods has catch and sell fish. The market gunners 

been permitted by the States and now is and poorer classes of sportsmen who 

to be encouraged in a large way by the wish to sell game, the owners of country 

National Government. places, the farmers big and small all 

The game farms in the older coun- contribute, each from his proper place, 

tries keep the shooting clubs and syndi- to send the food to the markets where 

cates and the owners of country places the poor as well as the rich can procure 

well supplied with live game when any !t vel T cheaply. 

shortage occurs or when it is desired A glance at the map of any State indi- 

to increase the supply. So much game cates that there are numerous places, 

is produced on the country estates and suitable for the breeding of wild fowl 

on the farms big and small that often and other game, many of which are not 



46 



THE GAME BREEDER 



suitable for agriculture. Many small 
ponds and marshy tracts where no wild 
ducks breed today can be utilized for 
wild duck breeding and made to yield 
abundantly when the fowl are made and 
kept plentiful on such areas either for 
profit or for sport, as easily they can be. 
Many of the birds will go out and visit 
the larger lakes and ponds in the State 
and the bays and streams which are open 
to the public, and the shooting for all 
hands will be much improved. Those 
who by their industry will produce wild 
fowl or other game on places where it 
no longer occurs will perform a great 
public service and there is abundant evi- 
dence that the tendency of our legislation 
is in the direction of encouraging food 
production. 

The Agricultural Department in addi- 
tion to its regulations permitting the 
taking of birds and eggs for propagation 
should issue bulletins on the methods of 
game breeding in order that the farmers 
and sportsmen may know how to keep 



the wild food birds profitably plentiful. 
The regulations as written have the ef- 
fect of criminal laws and one of them 
which provides that the birds must be 
taken "otherwise than by shooting'' 
should, of course, be repealed, as it no 
doubt will be since the shooting is an 
inducement to production. Country 
places, shooting clubs and syndicates are 
the best customers of the game farmers 
who produce birds and eggs for profit. 
The regulation appears to be inharmoni- 
ous with the statute which says in effect 
that nothing in it shall be construed to 
prevent the shooting of game on the 
country places which abroad are called 
preserves and in some of our Western 
States now are called game ranches. 

At a recent convention of the State 
Game Officers of the United States and 
Canada held in New York, a resolution 
was adopted, unanimously, providing 
that all States which had not done so 
should amend their laws so as to make 
game farming a legal industry. 



ADVERTISE NOW TO EASE PERIOD 
OF RECONSTRUCTION. 

The Best Use of War Profits. 

By George Frank Lord,, 
Director of Advertising, du Pont American Industries, Wilmington, Del. 



We advertisers deal in long futures. 
We are the prophets of those futures. 
Ours is the duty; ours is the oppor- 
tunity to buy now that confidence of the 
world's peoples in the future of this 
country under peace conditions in order 
that the curtain shall not rise on anarchy 
and unreasoning panic, but on calm con- 
fidence that the world's leaders are pre- 
pared and have been prepared to meet 
the problems that will appear on the 
world's stage at the dawn of peace. 

The setting of that stage will be a 

world smeared and scarred wjth the 

: scourge of war. The bright light of the 

new day, will only serve to show in all 

.ugliness the torn soil, shattered homes 



and buildings and bared bones of the 
millions that have found the final peace. 
Who shall lift the minds of that sad- 
dened multitude from the Slough of De- 
spond to the heights where strife and 
separation and sorrow may be forgotten 
and productive Constructive peace of 
mind attained? 

Who but we advertisers that have the 
skill and means to talk to all the world 
and whose own constructive interests are 
identical with these humanitarian neces- 
sities? 

Today the business of America is al- 
most completely on a war basis. The 
people of America are warriors on the 



THE GAME BREEDER 



47 



line or behind the line. In a day — a day 
soon to come — -all this must be changed. 

Five million soldiers and sailors will 
be freed from action. At least twenty 
million men and women war workers 
will be no longer needed for war work. 
Billions in capital, in plants, in equip- 
ment, will be suddenly available for peace 
use. Can the conversion of this capi- 
tal, these facilities, these millions of peo- 
ple be made in a day on plans hastily 
formed? 

It seems a waste of effort to give the 
obvious answer. For more than a year 
this swift moving America has been 
struggling to get onto a war basis and is 
just attaining it. 

RECONSTRUCTION MUST NECESSARILY 
COME GRADUALLY. 

The task of getting back onto a peace 
basis is even greater, because of the 
enormous expansion that has taken place 
in capital investment, war plants, war 
organizations, and production of mate- 
rials, and the general upsetting of social 
and living conditions. 

Every war plant, swelled to many 
times its former peace-time capacity 
means either great potential competition 
or prospective disastrous decay. 

In view of the world's pressing needs 
for reconstruction and restoration, it 
would be almost criminal to permit these 
great facilities to pass away in rust and 
rot. They must and shall be employed 
for the good of the world, and it is the 
plain duty and responsibility of their 
owners to provide now for such peace 
employment. 

What America needs now is not an 
attitude of doubt and hesitation on the 
part of her commercial leaders. She 
needs the employment of millions of sur- 
plus capital in the present building of 
post-war work. Yes ! — work — not 
merely business. 

In America alone twenty-five million 
people— fully half of our adult effec- 
tives — will want work, and must have 
work to earn sustenance. 

How can any business succeed or 
even exist until that fundamental de- 
mand has been met? It is not a ques- 
tion of profit or dividends, but a larger 



one of protection of property. There is 
no such word as law in the vocabulary 
of a starving man. 

It being admitted that the long future 
of America after the war is bound to 
be good, it is obvious that all this coun- 
try needs to do is to make provision for 
perhaps six months of world readjust- 
ment. That six months is the critical 
period in which American business must 
be artificially stimulated. 

PLAN NOW FOR INCREASED SALES. 

Immediately the war has stopped, 
everyone should buy all the practical 
commodities he can use, in order to cre- 
ate in this country a temporary market 
large enough to absorb our immensely 
increased production, and keep every 
factory filled with workers. This is, of 
course, nothing more nor less than in- 
flation of domestic commerce. 

It may be likened to the production of 
artificial respiration in a drowned man. 
As soon, as he gets to breathing prop- 
erly he no longer needs the stimulation, 
provided he has plenty of reserve vitality 
and there is plenty of £ir. 

I admit this argument is indefensible 
under normal conditions, but believe -it 
entirely so under post-war conditions 
when we are soon to be faced with the 
colossal problem of production of all 
necessities and utilities for the greater 
part of the world. 

We must then be in position to utilize 
to the maximum our industrial facilities, 
our new merchant marine, our war-born 
efficiency, and most important of all, a 
contented, united army of workers — 
laborers, mechanics, artisans, clerks and 
executives — an army every member of 
which has learned through this war the 
duty and necessity of mutual trust and 
interdependence. 

Just how can advertisers render the 
great service here outlined? I suggest 
immediate action along the following 
lines : 

1. Let each employing concern, espe- 
cially those directly or indirectly engaged 
in war work (and which is not?), make 
a careful study of its business to deter- 
mine what proportion of its war-time 
organization it can employ under nor- 



48 



THE GAME BREEDER 



mal peace conditions. It will be learned 
that the greater the war activity of the 
concern, the smaller that proportion 
will be. 

2. Next determine what larger pro- 
portion could be employed if new lines 
of manufacture are undertaken and sales 
stimulated by the expenditure, if neces- 
sary, of all the war profits of the con- 
cern, in operating development, sales 
promotion, and advertising "stimulation. 

3. Lay out a program of manufac- 
ture, promotion and advertising consist- 
ent with these determinations, and put it 
under way as far as continued war 
activity permits. 

Since operating development is inter- 
nal and private, and sales promotion, 
cannot proceed far in advance of ability 
to deliver the goods, advertising is the 
only part of the program that can be 
started as soon as the plan is perfected. 

This advertising must necessarily be 
of an institutional character, because in- 
creased sales are practically impossible 
now. It should frankly tell the public 
that the concern wants to make known 
jts future sale intentions so as to find 
after the war maximum employment for 
its people, plants and capital. It should 
urge everyone who has put off buying 
many necessary or desirable commodities 
until after the war to investigate now 
and be ready as soon as possible after 
the war to buy these commodities, so 
that everybody may be employed at good 
wages after the war, and our war-time 
industry and efficiency maintained intact 
, for our great peace-time task and oppor- 
tunity. 

Such advertising, well handled, is 
bound to inspire confidence on the part 
of war workers as to peace-time employ- 
ment at wages consistent with a continu- 
ing high cost of living. It will inspire 
confidence on the part of timid capital 
that may fear a peace panic, just as it 
incorrectly feared a war panic in the first 
year of the war and another when 
America entered the war. 

We advertisers can render their fear 
groundless by building a bridge of con- 
fidence and trade stimulation to carry 



America through the first six months of 
readjustment. 

Commercial inflation and commercial 
depression are both artificial conditions 
that may be controlled. The interest of 
America and of the whole world de- 
mands maximum possible commercial 
activity and accumulation of commodi- 
ties during the readjustment period. It 
is to our interest to make this accumu- 
lation to meet the deluge of foreign 
orders. It is our duty to make it that 
we may meet the rest of the world's 
urgent needs for food, clothing and all 
necessities and utilities with minimum 
delay. 

During the period of readjustment 
there will be unprecedented competition. 
In every line of common commodities 
there will be overproduction because of 
the conversion of war plants into manu- 
factories of goods for which full capacity 
for American requirements already 
exists. 

This peace-time capacity is, however, 
on a basis ratable throughout the year, 
whereas in the period of readjustment 
the domestic demand will be far greater 
than the normal supply because of the 
deferred business caused by the war. 

In this era of increased competition 
in this country and introduction of 
American commodities abroad, brands 
and trade-marks will reach their maxi- 
mum value. As every advertiser knows, 
it takes a long time and either many 
sales or much advertising to establish 
trade-mark supremacy. 

Those who start now to establish the 
supremacy of their brands and marks 
will have easy going when peace breaks. 
They will leave the tape at the crack of 
the starter's pistol while the laggards 
are starting to train for the race. 

The advertiser or business man who 
attempts at this time to determine his 
policy on the usual year by year basis is 
bound to lose. 

America has been enriched by the war. 
We own our country and have mortgages 
on much of the rest of the world. It is 
unquestionably to our advantage as it is 



THE GAME BREEDER 



49 



our duty and responsibility to administer means to bring about the universal broth- 

this wealth for the benefit of all the rest erhood of man and the end of indefensi- 

of the world. ble war by the operation of enlightened 

We have in our hands the most potent self-interest. — From Printers' Ink. 



BREEDING THE WILD TURKEY. 



By Gilbert F. Johnson. 



We have had so many inquiries asking 
for the description, rearing, etc., of the 
wild turkey, that I will endeavor to de- 
scribe these birds and our method of rais- 
ing them as best I can. 

There appears to be several distinct 
varieties of wild turkeys, namely : those 
of Florida, Mexico and eastern North 
America. They are all somewhat alike, 
except that the Mexican wild turkey has 
white tips to the rump and tail coverts 
while the other varities have chestnut 
brown. A genuine wild turkey has a 
small, slender head of a bluish color, with 
less caruncles. Bodies are long and slen- 
der. They are always active, alert, shy 
and graceful. The body color is a deep 
bronze with a more prominent copper 
color than the domestic, upper and tail 
coverts chestnut brown, wing coverts 
bronze tipped with black. Primaries dark 
brown and white, white bars being mot- 
tled with brown on inner web. Second- 
aries same, only bars narrower and paler 
brown. 

A great many people have the impres- 
sion that the wild turkey cannot be do- 
mesticated, that they are too wild to be 
given liberty. It is true that the wild 
turkey is one of our wildest birds and 
\ery hard to bag, but nevertheless they 
can be domesticated and will become 
nearly as tame as our domestic turkeys. 

Our birds are kept in a ten acre in- 
closure, divided into two pens. During 
breeding and laying season, in order to 
find the eggs, piles of brush, boxes and 
barrels are placed in these pens for the 
hens to lay in. Eggs are gathered daily 
and the date and variety is marked on 
each egg. 

The turkey hens are given free range 



with the young after they are about six 
weeks old. They will always stay close 
to their home and when fall comes will 
bring home their young, which will be 
about as tame as their mother. We pre- 
fer raising our turkeys in a semi-wild 
state, by this I mean, letting the turkey 
hen take care of the young from the time 
they are hatched to maturity. They al- 
ways make much larger and healthier 
turkeys, than when fed by hand. Last 
year we raised some both ways. The 
domestic that were fed by hand were not 
near as large as the wild of the same age. 

The wild turkey seems to stand North 
Dakota weather well as all our turkeys 
roost in the open the year round. They 
have an open shed to go into when it is 
storming but they will never roost inside. 
They seem to have some fear and always 
want to roost where they can see every- 
thing. 

The wild turkey is equal to the grouse 
for countries where the snow is deep as 
they can live on buds of trees. Also 
roost in trees out of reach of ground 
animals. 

If they are to be raised in a wild state, 
I would advise sowing a few acres of 
grain, corn, etc., in open patches or be- 
tween trees and kept standing so that 
the turkeys could find the grain when 
the snow is deep. Also to fence a part 
of those woods to protect the setting hens 
and the young ones from ground vermin. 
By so doing they would increase rapidly. 
The young wild seems to stand dampness 
and cold much better than the domestic 
turkey. 

If it is desired to breed the wild tur- 
key for sport, they would have to be kept 



50 



THE GAME BREEDER 



in a very secluded place, far away from 
people, where the timber is very dense. 
Otherwise they would soon become tame 
■ — too tame for sport. When bred in do- 
mestication, they soon lose all fear and 
become as tame and large as the domestic 
turkey. 

The wild turkeys do not lay as early 
as the domestic turkeys. Not until all 
danger of frost is over. Therefore do not 
hatch before about the middle of June, 
when the weather is more settled and 
warmer. Also insect life is more abun- 
dant, which is 95 per cent of their food. 

We have had wild turkeys hatched as 
late as July 7th, which were given free 
range with no care from us, that were 
much larger and healthier than domestic 
hatched June 1st, that were hand fed and 
kept tame. 

Give turkeys free range and keep the 
young as wild as possible until nearly 
full grown. They will soon become tame 
when snow covers the _ground and you 
begin to feed them. The tamer a turkey 
is, the more subject he is to disease. 

For those who love wild game birds, I 
especially recommend the wild turkey. 



They are much easier raised and handled 
than any other wild game. They are very 
handsome birds, much more so than the 
domestic turkey. 

The wild crossed with the domestic 
produces the best domestic turkey that 
can be had. Greatly improved vitality, 
plumage and form without being a dis- 
advantage in any way ; also gives them 
an astonishing ability to take care of 
themselves. 

What greater pleasure than breeding 
a thoroughly domesticated wild bird? 
Not tamed through the gradual process 
of centuries of breeding and handling, 
but converted from the natural state of 
the wild game bird of the forest to a 
tame turkey almost in a year. 

A great many ask us if they will not 
fly away. A wild turkey does not care 
to fly under any condition unless abso- 
lutely necessary and then only for a short 
distance. They would much rather run, 
as they are remarkably swift. 

It is my firm belief that the only hope 
of the turkey raising industry depends 
on raising the pure wild turkey. Are 
they worthy a trial? 



NOTES FROM THE GAME FARMS AND PRESERVES. 



Country Living. 

Henry Ford, in a newspaper clipping 
sent to the Game Breeder, is reported to 
have said : "I have always held the be- 
lief that too many people live in the cities 
of these United States and too few in the 
country." 

In an editorial the World, N. Y., says : 
Henry Ford, who has spent some not un- 
profitable years answering questions by 
trying experiments, purposes to ascertain 
if a cripple soldier returned from France 
can make a good living, provide for a 
family and insure a comfortable old age 
on a small farm. 

Mr. Ford will provide the farm, with 
bouse, barn, stock and tools, and install 
a soldier on it as a purely business trans- 
action. The cost of the home will be 
about $4,500 complete. The handi- 



capped farmer's problem will be to make 
a living and pay for the place, principal 
and interest. A market for his produce 
is guaranteed as part of the arrangement. 

"It is most appropriate that Mr. Ford 
asks Secretary Lane to select a soldier 
who would like to try this experiment. 

"For what Mr. Ford proposes to do in 
one instance is substantially what the 
Secretary of the Interior believes the 
United States itself should do on a gi- 
gantic scale, inviting returned soldiers to 
take up land that needs draining, clearing 
or irrigation and 'staking' them until they 
are fairly started. 

"Mr. Ford has 4,000 acres on which his 
experiment can be tried and, if he desires, 
repeated." 

We have suggested that game be made 
an asset of the farm. We will send The 



THE GAME BREEDER 



51 



Game Breeder to tell the soldiers how to 
breed game. The quail and the prairie 
grouse, the dove and other game birds 
are said to be beneficial to agriculture 
and these and many other game birds 
should be bred on all farms. 

Mr. Roualt, the capable State Game 
Warden for New Mexico, was among the 
first of the State officers to favor the 
idea that game ranches should be profit- 
able in his State and in a paper on "Game 
Farming" which he wrote and which was 
read at a recent meeting of the State 
Game officers he advocated the granting 
of land for game farms to soldiers at 
the end of the war. 



Poison Sumach, Ducks and Quail. 

One of our Connecticut wild duck 
breeders writes that he was ill for some 
weeks with a severe form of "swamp- 
sumach" poisoning contracted while 
working in the swamp where he keeps 
his ducks. "I have so far been fairly- 
successful with the birds. They are all 
feathered out and in the past few weeks 
they have been flying at will. They are 
a nice lot and I am particularly pleased 
with the ducks obtained from Mr. Du- 
sette, of Bad Axe. He is a fine fellow 
and a white man. I have bought both 
eggs and birds of him and there is no 
question about the purity of his breed. 

"I am thankful for the information 
about quail and grouse. There is in my 
neighborhood another farm and a much 
larger one than mine. I am trying to get 
hold of this place, there being two fair 
sized ponds on it. It would also afford a 
very good opportunity for breeding quail 
and grouse, which I should much like to 
try. 

"I hope to join the Game Breeders' 
Association soon. I shall be very glad 
to do so." 

[We suggest that you write to our adver- 
tisers promptly about the quail or you may not 
get any. — Editor.] 



large excess of cock bob whites an at- 
tempt will be made to cross the bob 
whites with the Gambel's quail and also 
to see if the last-named quail will act as 
foster mothers for young bob whites 
hatched in captivity. 

An attempt will be made to introduce 
the Gambel quail and the scaled quail on 
Long Island, and it is believed that if it 
is possible to introduce and establish 
these western birds in the eastern states 
the society can accomplish this work, 
since it will be done with good numbers 
of birds. 

The liberation of a few birds in a 
strange place where vermin is not con- 
trolled is not a fair test but the libera- 
tion of many birds in protected fields 
should prove if these western quail can 
be made to thrive and multiply in the 
eastern states. 

Wild turkeys will be hatched in cap- 
tivity and liberated. The hybrid, mal- 
lard-dusky duck has been introduced by 
the transfer of one-day-old birds from 
Massachusetts and eggs of the hybrid 
will be hatched on the preserve of the 
Long Island Game Breeders Association 
and their speed over the guns will be 
given a fair test next October. Prairie 
grouse will be hatched from eggs and an 
attempt will be made to establish these 
birds in several places where they long 
have been extinct. These experiments 
will be made in the west. 

These and other interesting experi- 
ments made by using the fund usually 
expended on the annual game dinner will 
be reported in The Game Breeder from 
time to time. If we can make the prairie 
grouse as plentiful as pheasants are and 
can get some stock birds into the hands 
of sporting clubs and commercial breed- 
ers soon they will become plentiful in 
many places. We have had some diffi- 
culty in getting birds and eggs for this 
experiment but when we set out to do 
anything we usually do it sooner or later. 



Experimental Work. 

The Game Conservation Society is mak- 
ing some important experiments in breed- 
ing quail. Since the Society secured a 



The Game Market. 

Pheasants are selling at $5.50 to $6.00 
per pair, and it seems likely the prices 
will advance rapidly, since some of the 
big "shoots" are buying birds for the fall 



52 



THE GAME BREEDER 



to supplement their hand-rearing opera- 
tions, and many breeders have taken our 
advice and are buying their breeding 
stock for next spring before the prices 
go up, as they surely will. 

The demand for wild ducks is not so 
strong yet as it will be later. Ducks are 
big eaters and many of the "shoots" and 
some breeders are willing to wait and 
take a chance of paying a much better 
price than the ducks sell for, $2.50 and 
$3.00 per pair. 

♦ 

Use of Incubators in England. 

G. Tosette, of Swaffham Prior, Cam- 
bridge, England, says: "I only have par- 
tridges hatched from eggs found in nests 
cut out by the mowing machine, or other- 
wise disturbed. These eggs are put un- 
der ordinary hens, and when chipped all 
but five or six are taken away from under 
the hen and put in the incubator. When 
hatched and dry they are returned to the 
hen. This is done to prevent the hen 
from stamping on the chicks and killing 
several, which might happen when she 
has a large number to hatch. 

Col. A. Trotter, Charterhall, Berwick- 
shire, says : "Eggs are put into the incu- 
bator or under bantams when the bird 
deserts while setting; these eggs, when 
hatched, are taken from the incubator or 
bantam and added to other broods which 
are known to be hatching off. 

"The following is one of many ex- 
amples : A bird setting on her nest was 
found dead and cold near the nest ; she 
should have hatched off the following 
day. The eggs were put into the incu- 
bator; seventeen came out and were put 
down with a brood that hatched off.the 
same day. No partridges are hand- 
reared." 

Hon. G. Legge Patshull, Staffordshire, 
says : "I certainly believe in finding all 
nests possible, especially in a fox country. 
They should be visited frequently until 
the bird has been sitting for eight or ten 
days, after which they should be seen 
every day. Then, if the bird has been 
put off through any cause, the eggs often 
can be saved before they get cold. They 
are then added to nests of birds which 
have been setting for same length of 
time, or, failing them, put in the incu- 



bator, and, when hatched, taken out and 
put to an old bird with young of the same 
age. This latter course was successfully 
adopted with three or four nests this 
year." 

G. W. Taylor, Esq., Pickenham, Nor- 
folk, says: "The incubator always is 
useful, ''but use it sparingly, and always 
remember in rearing partridges that, 
given a decent season, you never will 
bring up as many chicks as the wild bird 
will herself." 

C. Cockburn, Esq., Weeting Hall, Nor- 
folk, says : "I always pick up a few par- 
tridge eggs from ruined nests and put 
them in an incubator; if they are not 
sat on, I always put them in other nests 
if possible. 

Mr. Ross, headkeeper, The Hoo, Hert- 
fordshire, says : "All eggs in dangerous 
places are lifted, and incubated to chip- 
ping point, when they are changed again 
with the sham or clear eggs which were 
given to the partridge." 



Good Shooting. 

Although a late start was made it is 
certain that the members of the Long 
Island Game Breeders' Association will 
have some quail and pheasant shooting. 
We hope some sportsmen from game 
prohibition States may have a chance 
to visit the new shoot and that they will 
return home convinced that it is not a 
difficult or an expensive matter to have 
good shooting during a long open season. 
All that is needed is a game breeders' 
law and a little activity in the way of 
game production. 



Sportsmen Favor Game Breeding. 

Hundreds of sportsmen now tell us 
they favor the breeding of game and the 
sale of some of it when it is necessary 
to help pay the cost of production. We 
shall publish some of the letters. 

Mr. Albert Stoll, Jr., editor of the 
Michigan Sportsman, an attractive maga- 
zine, in a letter to The Game Breeder, 
says : 

"We most assuredly do favor the sell- 
ing of game under proper regulations in 
the case mentioned. There is no ques- 
tion but that it is better to produce and 



THE GAME BREEDER 



53 



propagate our wild life even if the rev- 
enue to do so must come from the sale 
of a part of the animals." 



Quail Breeding. 

We had hoped to publish in this issue 
some account of our quail breeding ex- 
periments, giving plans and specifications 
which worked out very well. We learned 
many things in a few days at the farm 
which will interest our readers. The 
young quail evidently are fond of at least 
two kinds of green weed seeds, and it 
seems likely that such green food and 
insects may be all that they need when 
reared in pens with low wires over which 
the young can fly to protected gardens. 
A little Spratt's food and chick food 
keeps them at home. We wish to get 
some particulars accurately from the 
game keeper before we write the report 
of the experiment and we wish to have 
a few drawings made of the pens and 
coops. Next year we shall issue cards 
to those who wish to do so to visit the 
place during the breeding season and see 
how the work is carried on. We hope 
also to be able to issue cards to some who 
will like to join us in the harvesting 
which will be done exclusively by shoot- 
ing. No salt on the tails goes with us 
and no hatchets ever will be applied to 
the necks of our quail. Many new places 
will be started as the result of our experi- 
ments, no doubt. This means the sale 
of more guns and dogs in the States 
where the quail are not song-birds. 



and tell us what they wish to know. — Editor.] 

Editor Game Breeder : 

Has the wild pigeon which is aboun- 
dant in England ever been imported and 
introudced in America? Would it do 
well on American game farms and pre- 
serves? Ohio Reader. 



The last part of your question is diffi- 
cult. Birds from one country often for 
some reason do not do well in another. 
See answer to the bob-white question. 
We do not know if the English wood- 
pigeon ever has been liberated in Amer- 
ica. If any of our readers know any- 
thing about this we shall be glad to hear 
from them. We suggested trying this 
bird to Mr. Napier of the New Jersey 
Game Commission one day when we were 
at the State Game Farm at Forked River. 
The head-keeper, Mr. Dunn, said he 
could see no reason why the birds could 
not be established in America and we be- 
lieve Mr. Napier decided to give them a 
trial. Probablv the war interfered with 
this. The birds are a nuisance in some 
places in England and we have no doubt 
in normal times they can be obtained 
cheaply. We shall urge the Long Island 
Game Breeders' Association to give them 
a trial when the birds can be obtained and 
we hope in the meantime any of our 
readers who know anything about this 
subject will write to us. 



QUESTIONS. 

[Many questions are asked by readers of The 
Game Breeder every month. We have an- 
swered some of these in the mail and others 
have been answered in the magazine. Those, 
asking about the game laws usually are re- 
ferred to the state departments. Those asking 
where they can procure game are referred 
always to our advertisers who can furnish 
the best which can be had for money. There 
are many questions about game handling, feed- 
ing and rearing and some inquiries come about 
foreign game and the possibility of introduc- 
ing it. As we have said, we can answer many 
of the quetsions and we know where to get 
information on any subject since all the game 
keepers in America and all of the game 
farmers and breeders are members of the 
Society and read the magazine. We believe the 
questions asked will interest our readers and 
we hope many will continue to ask questions 



Bobwhites. 

Could the quail be made abundant on 
a game farm in north central Wisconsin 
and would they be profitable? Have 
these birds ever been exported and intro- 
duced in foreign countries? 

Wisconsin. R. a. S. 



We believe the quail is on the song bird 
list in your State but a law soon will be 
enacted making it possible to breed quail 
for sport and for profit. Write to your 
State game officer and urge him to see 
that the quail is included when a new 
game farming law is enacted. We can 
see no reason why the birds should not 
do well on a farm in your region, pro- 
vided grain be cultivated. Climate is the 
worst difficulty, but where quail are prop- 
erly looked after they will stand severe 



54 



THE GAME BREEDER 



winters. Some birds in exposed situa- 
tions can be trapped and brought in for 
the winter. 

H. J- Montanus, of the Middle Island 
Club, wrote a short note for the Game 
Breeder, telling how they brought their 
quail through a severe winter by using a 
snow plow and finding many covies on 
the line plowed. 

Mr. Baldwin, of the Montana Game 
Commission, wrote an article about how 
the bobwhite had been introduced and 
made abundant in his State. We can 
send you this article if you would like 
to have it. If the quail thrive in Mon- 
tana they should do so in your State. 

Quail have been introduced in England 

but we believe they did not do well there. 

-• 

A Parson and a Wood-pigeon. 

Owen Jones says : "I know a parson 
who is very keen on shooting wood- 
pigeons. He is fond of telling how one 
day he was out after pigeons in a thick 
fog, and a pigeon actually settled on his 
clerical hat, when he had stopped to 
light his pipe. There is a credible wit- 
ness of this part of the story ; but it is 
said that his reverence was so surprised 
that he put his pipe in his pocket alight, 
thinking it was an olive branch." 

A Hawk and a Club Warden. 
Mr. Jones' story of the parson reminds 
me of one told by a club warden at the 
Ottawa Club in the Sandusky (Ohio) 
marshes. He said he was seated one day 
watching the ducks when a big hawk lit 
on his head, giving him quite a thump. 
He thought a companion had approached 
from behind and struck him on the head 
in order to surprise him. Turning to 
remonstrate, the hawk took wing and he 
shot it. 

♦ — 

Free Chicken Irresistible. 

August Silz, chairman of the poultry divi- 
sion of the Liberty Loan Committee, is giving 
a chicken luncheon to every person who sub- 
scribes for a bond at his travelling army 
kitchen. 

The kitchen, with Mr. Silz's French chef in 
charge (Mr. Silz himself came from France 
long before he discovered and popularized the 
guinea hen as a game bird), left his place 
of business at 416 West Fourteenth street 
yesterday and rolled its appetizing way down 
town. Before it stopped for the day it had 
tickled the palates and touched the pocket- 
books of many hungry patriots in West Wash- 



ington Market (the live poultry centre), 
Washington Market and Wall Street. 

All that was necessary to get a good feed 
of stewed chicken (the recipe is Mr. Silz's 
French chef's secret), bread and butter and 
coffee was to dig up for at least one bond for 
Uncle Sam. 

In Washington Market alone $36,000 was 
subscribed. The quota for Mr. Silz's division 
for the fourth loan is $500,000. Its quota for 
the third loan was $225,000, but through Mr. 
Silz's efforts $400,000 was subscribed. 

We wonder how many bonds Quail on 
Toast would have sold. The man who 
popularized the guinea hen may remem- 
ber that protectionists thought seriously 
of putting the hen on the song bird list. 
We hope and believe that soon the bond 
wagon can serve quail on toast. We can 
supply some of the birds before long. It 
is a safe bet that quail on toast is coming 

back. 

♦ 

OUTINGS AND INNINGS. 
Hopelessly Under Suspicion. 
"I had terrible luck in that poker 
game,'' exclaimed Piute Pete. 

"I understand you won some money." 
"What's money when your reputation's 
gone? I held four aces three times in 
half an hour, and there ain't nobody that 
kin ever explain nothin* like that to his 
feller-citizens in Crimson Gulch." — 
Washington Star. 



A Friendly Arrangement. 

"Are you going to make a garden 
next year?'* 

"No," replied Mr. Crosslots. "I made 
a garden this year and my neighbor kept 
chickens. Next year it's going to be my 
turn to have the chickens." — Washington 
Star. 



Left Behind. 

Preacher (earnestly) — Remember, the 
millionaire cannot take his money with 
him. 

Returned Vacationist — No, indeed. He 
leaves most of it at the railway station 
when he buys his ticket, these davs. — 
Life. 



Precocious Kentucky Babies. 

In addition to wholesale births in Pen- 
dleton County the babies are now report- 
ed born with teeth. They seem to forget 
this is the Hoover age, not the Fletcher. 
— Cynthiana (Ky.) Democrat. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



55 



T*?5 Game Breeder 



Published Monthly 



Ewted by DWIGHT W. HUNTINGTON 



NEW YORK, NOVEMBER, 1918. 



TERMS: 

10 Cents a Copy — $1.00 a year in Advanee. 

Postage free to all subscribers in the United States. 
To All Foreign Countries and Canada, $1.25. 

The Game Conservation Society, Inc. 
publishers, 150 nassau st., new york 

D. W. Hvntington, President, 

F. R. Peixotto, Treasurer, 

J. C. Huntington, Secretary. 
E. Dayton, Advertising Manager. 
Telephone, Beekman 3685. 



THE BREAKFAST HYPHEN 

The World, discussing the protest 
of hotelkeepers to the Food Board 
against classing liver-and-bacon as two 
separate meat dishes, says : "As well, 
they would say, separate the pork from 
the bean, or the cabbage from the corned 
beef or the buckwheats from the maple 
syrup. One is the necessary complement 
of the other. And what nobler tribute 
could be paid to that excellent dish, 
whose very existence is now imperilled, 
than to paraphrase a sentence of Dan- 
iel Webster? Liver-and-bacon, now and 
forever, one and inseparable !" 

Distressing as the calamity undoubt- 
edly is it does not compare in dreadful- 
ness with the divorcing of the quail from 
the toast. The liver and the bacon can 
survive separately until the end of the 
war but in some States the quail has 
gone on the song bird list forever and 
only the toast survives. 

Our readers will be glad to learn that 
we have brought about a restoration of 
quail on toast locally on considerable 
areas and that we will serve two kinds of 
quail on toast to some of our friends 
next month when we take them out to 
lunch. One taste will be sufficient we 
are sure to make them all quail pro- 
ducers. 



IMPORTATION OF MEXICAN 
QUAIL. 

The recommendation of the Hon. J. 
Quincy Ward, of Kentucky, that quail 
importations should be permitted from 
November 15 to April 15 is highly proper. 
We do not agree, however, to the idea 
that "no birds should be sent north of the 
Mason and Dixon line before March 1.'' 
We have purchased many quail from 
Mexico and elsewhere in the fall and we 
have carried them through the winter 
without loss. We know that birds which 
have been held in any new locality for a 
long period will settle down and nest 
earlier than birds which are delivered at 
or near the nesting period. We regard 
March 1 as entirely too late for the quail 
breeders of Long Island, N. Y., and 
other northern places to begin receiving 
their stock. We had many late eggs this 
season of both Gambel's and Bobwhites 
because we were late in getting started 
and we had some losses of young birds 
because they were hatched so late that 
they encountered cold and wet weather 
when quite small. Our losses were sur- 
prisingly small considering the cold, but 
we know full well the losses would have 
been fewer in number and the birds 
would have been far easier to rear had 
they been turned into the gardens pre- 
pared for them in the early summer. 

We prefer to shoot in October, when 
the weather is fine and it is a pleasure 
to be out of doors, but late quail are not 
big enough to shoot in October. All quail 
breeders know that it is an easy matter 
to carry quail through the winter in con- 
finement. . We have had, repeatedly, 
no losses due to the winter handling of 
quail in numerous places north of the 
line referred to. Upon. one occasion we 
wintered a good lot of quail on the brick 
pavement of a narrow back yard in a 
large city without the loss of a single 
bird. The birds were so strong in the 
spring that they all flew over a high wall 
and settled in a neighboring yard where 
there was more sunlight. 

Those who prefer to purchase stock 
in the fall should have the right to do 
so. Any loss due to climate will fall on 
the purchaser, and we have no hesitation 
in advising purchasers that there will be 



56 THE GAME BREEDER 

no appreciable losses if they purchase in shall no longer be criminal to produce 

the fall. We give this advice without any kind of plants or animals on the 

hesitation since it is founded on experi- farms. We would strongly advise Mr. 

ence gained in several localities and cov- Ward to encourage the creation of a 

ering a long period of years. There number of quail ranches in Kentucky and 

should be no unreasonable restraints to keep the money which now is sent to 

upon food producers. Mexico at home. As a matter of fact 

^__^___ we can send more money to Kentucky 

than now is sent to Mexico, provided 

WHY SEND MONEY ABROAD? Kentucky will permit the production of 

Mr. Ward is very nearly right in his tne q uail - Kentucky birds are far better 
statement that quail can not be exported than Mexican birds and will bring better 
from any State for breeding purposes, prices. Plans and specifications for quail 
We have procured birds from only a very ranches can be procured from The Game 
few places and in small numbers where Breeder on request. We shall soon pub- 
permits have been issued to take birds lish these with diagrams showing cheaply 
for scientific purposes. It is necessary constructed appliances, 
to send large sums of money abroad to Can an y° n e imagine that it will be un- 
purchase small birds when much better popular to produce food at this time ? 
birds easily could be produced on the P- S. — Dear Mr. Ward, we hope you 
American farms. This is one of many will back us up in our campaign to re- 
legal absurdities which intelligent game store quail on toast. Your mention of 
officers should and can bring to an end. the pointer dog revives many pleasant 

Why say to a gunner, "You may de- memories of big bags of quail made in 

stroy ten or twenty-five birds in a day" Ohio before they all became song birds 

when it is well known that shooting in there, and we certainly enjoyed eating 

places such as Mr. Ward describes must the birds and giving them to friends. We 

result in extermination, and deny to quail are now quail producers and if you come 

breeders the right to obtain birds and to New York at any time we shall be 

eggs for breeding purposes from the pleased to have you eat with us two or 

farmers who do not permit shooting? three species of quail properly served. 

Kentucky easily can be made a big quail We extend also an invitation to see quail 

producing State. A few good commer- production as it is carried on by skilled 

cial quail ranches properly conducted hands. We have plain but good quarters 

easily can be made, to produce far more ( an °ld f arm house) and we can show 

quail than are imported annually from y° u nex t summer plenty of young quail. 

Mexico. It is most interesting to see them flying 

We know a farmer, not so very far out °f tne pens to the gardens and back 

away, who has experimented with quail a £ ain to £ et warm under their mothers 

and has produced good numbers at small in tne coops. __^ 

expense. When he found he could not 

ship his birds he turned them over to the GAME BREEDING A GOOD USE 

hawks, cats and other vermin and re- FOR WAR PROFIT. 

cently he reported that over two-thirds of We invite our readers', and especially 

them already had been destroyed. He our advertisers' attention to an excellent 

says he knows quite a few farmers who article by George Frank Lord, Director 

do not approve of what he describes as of Advertising, du Pont American Indus- 

"rotten politics.'' tries, Wilmington, Delaware. Much of 

We would hardly care to stand for re- what he says applies to the new American 

election to the Assembly in his neighbor- industry, Game Breeding. Advertisers 

hood. It does not seem to intelligent not only of sporting arms and ammuni- 

sportsmen to be good business to insist tion, but also those who have game farms 

that the quail must become a song bird and the many appliances used on game 

and the farmers will need very little help farms, the incubators, traps, wire, coops, 

from sportsmen when they decide that it nesting boxes, egg turners, etc., and ad- 



THE GAME BREEDER 



57 



vertisers who have birds and eggs all 
surely can increase their output. They 
should say, as Mr. Lord well says : "We 
advertisers deal in long futures. Ours 
is the duty; ours is the opportunity to 
buy now," etc. 

The number of game ranches, game 
farms and preserves will increase rap- 
idly now that it is no longer criminal in 
many States to have game birds and eggs 
"in possession'' for breeding purposes. 
There will be a wonderful increase in the 
demand for birds and eggs and for all 
the appliances and foods used on game 
farms and preserves, and the advertisers 
should get ready to supply this demand 
and readers who have not been able to 
get into the war should make early prepa- 
rations to become customers of the ad- 
vertisers as many now are doing. When 
the big war demand for barbed wire 
ceases, those who advetrise wire should 
be well known to our readers who 
already are buying miles of wire. The 
makers of incubators and other appli- 
ances will find that it will pay to become 
acquainted with the Game Breeders who 
have ascertained that artificial hatching is 
possible on the game ranch and preserve. 
The increase in the demand for guns and 
ammunition will be great as soon as the 
war ends and the people undertake field 
sports and game production on a larger 
scale, as they will. 

Mr. Lord well says that, "those who 
start now to establish the supremacy of 
their brands and marks will have easy 
going when peace breaks. They will 
leave the tape at the crack of the starter's 
pistol while the laggards are starting to 
train for the race." 

Many men now in the service will be 
invited to take places in the country and 
it has been well said that field sports tend 
to keep people in the country and form 
a sufficient counterpoise to the pleasures 
of the town. The Government no doubt 
will provide lands for many who wish to 
undertake Game Farming for pleasure 
and profit, which our advertisers have 
made possible and popular. The Game 

» Breeder will always be filled with prac- 
tical articles. Now that the fight for 
more game and fewer game laws has 
been won its entire space can be devoted 



to practical articles on how to do things 
properly and profitably. 

America was caught unprepared in so 
far as game was concerned when the 
war started and the Game Departments 
were helpless, being bound by a mass of 
protective legislation which prevented 
food production. While game was for 
sale in the markets of all the belligerents 
long after the war started at prices much 
lower than those asked for poultry, 
America had no game excepting a few 
hundred thousand pheasants and ducks 
and some deer which were produced by 
our readers and these were practically 
all needed for breeding purposes on new 
places. 

As Mr. Lord has pointed out, large 
numbers of people will want work and 
must have work. Many thousands can 
find work on the farms and where game 
breeding and sport are undertaken the 
incentive to remain in the country will 
be great. Sport, as often we have 
pointed out, has nothing to fear from a 
great abundance of game on the places 
where it is produced. We became con- 
verted to the Game Breeding idea when 
we found upon coming to New York we 
could go out and find better shooting 
near a preserve than was to be had on 
our old shooting ground in the West, and 
this has since been closed to sport by 
reason of the only game bird remaining 
being placed on the song bird list. 

Mr. Lord well says that advertisers 
should frankly tell the public that the 
concern wants to make known its future 
sale intentions. The trade paper in any 
field covers the entire field usually and 
advertisers are well aware that in a new 
field of industry new customers are 
created every day and that- it pays to keep 
appropriate products always before them. 

We are consulted so often about the 
starting of new "shoots'' that we have no 
hesitation in saying there will be thou- 
sands of good shooting grounds (where 
game is preserved) where there are hun- 
dreds today. The country is so big that 
very little of it will be neded to keep up 
good shooting for all who wish to have 
game and to keep the business good for 
the advertisers who persistently tell our 
readers what they have to sell. 



58 



THE GAME BREEDER 




FENCES 

FOR GAME PRESERVES 

The_ accompanying photograph shows one of our Non-Climbable 
" RIOT " fences, erected by us, with our indestructible steel fence post 
8 feet high, surrounding the Yale Bowl Field, New Haven, Conn. 

This fence held in check 80,000 people who attended the Harvard- 
Yale Game, November 25th, 1916, and 60,000 people who attended the 
Princeton-Yale Game, November 13th, 1915. 

We have this fence and many other excellent designs. It will be 
to your advantage to secure our Catalogue, that shows many of the 
best erected fences in this country; also tells about our posts in 
detail ; how to erect a fence ; how to paint the fence wire to keep it 
from rusting. 

Become acquainted with our fence building system. It will save 
you many dollars and a great deal of worry. 

Fences for every purpose, with either straight or non-climbable post, 
tennis court back stops, etc., erected by our trained men anywhere. 



J. H. 

38 ROOSEVELT AVENUE 



DOWNS 

Suite A JERSEY CITY, N. J. 



RIVER LAWN GAME FARM 

R. H. SIDWAY 
GRAND ISLAND, ERIE CO., N. Y. 

Young Pheasants for Fall delivery 
extra fine, healthy non-related birds. 

My birds are raised for my own shooting and are very strong 

on the wing. 

Member of The Game Guild. Member American Game Breeders Society. 



FOR SALE. YOUNG BIRDS, THIS YEAR'S HATCH, 
one wing pinioned. Silver, &7.50 per pair; Goldens, 
$7.50 per pair; Ring-necks, $500 per pair; Mongolians, 
$6.50 per pair; Lady Arnhersts, $12.50 per pair; Reeves, 
$12.50 per pair ; Redhead Ducks, $10.00 per pair ; Man- 
darin Ducks, $12.50 per pair; Wood Ducks, $12.50 per pair; 
Mexican Tree Ducks, $12.50 per pair. M. R. CHEESMAN, 
Murray, R. F. D. No. 3, Utah. 3c 



Phone, 9286 Farragut FINE FURS 

JOHN MURGATROYD 

Taxidermist 

57 WEST 24th STREET 
Bet. Broadway and 6th Ave. NEW YORK 

Finest Work at Reasonable Prices 
Call and See for Yourself 



FREE FOUNDATION STOCK 

furnished to raise Rabbits, Cavies or 
Pigeons. Send dime for particulars and 
paper. 

Young's Tanning Compound, easily applied to any 
skin, large can $1.00, trial can 50c. Tattoo Ear 
Marker $1.50. Ear Tags 30c per dozen. Gibson's 
wonderful Rabbit Book $1.00. Cavy Book 50c. 
Squab Culture, a recognized authority on raising 
pigeons for profit, $1.00. 

NATIONAL FANCIER & BREEDER 

335 South East Avenue, Oak Park, III. 



The Breeders' and fanciers' News 

SCRANTON, PA. 

devoted to the breeding and marketing of ducks 
geese, turkeys (including the wild varieties), rab- 
bits, cavies, pigeons, etc. Organ of the American 
Buttercup Club, and Waterfowl Club of America. 
Interesting and instructive articles by able writers. 

50c a Year, 3 Years for $1.00 
Canada 75c a Year, 3 Years $1.75 

Special Trial Offer in U. S , 8 Months for 25c 

AD. RATES: 75c an inch, or for 3 months or more 
at rate of 65c an inch. Classified, 2c a word. 

Address 
BREEDERS' AND FANCIERS' NEWS 

1558 Dickson Ave., Scranton, Pa. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



THE GAME BREEDER 59 



Pheasants, Wild Mallard Ducks & Wild Turkeys 

FOR SALE 

Hatched This Year 

Tamarack Farms, Dousman, Waukesha County, Wis. 



WILD DUCK FOODS 

Wild Celery, Sago Pond Weed, Widgeon Grass, Red-Head Grass, Chara and other foods which 
attract water fowl. We have the best duck foods which will attract and hold the game and which 
impart the finest flavor to the flesh. We plan and arrange the plantings suitable to all'waters. 

GOOD SHOOTING 

^DURING THE OPEN SEASON 

I am prepared to entertain a number of sportsmen who wish to shoot wild geese, Canvasback and 
other wild ducks and quail, snipe, etc. Only srrall parties can be properly looked after. Appoint- 
ments to try the shooting and learn about the wild duck foods are made by correspondence. 

J. B. WHITE WATERLILY, CURRITUCK SOUND, NORTH CAROLINA 

Member of THE GAME GUILD 



Game Wanted 

t|- We are in the market to buy game. birds and deer 
raised" on licensed game preserves. We can use 
quantities of venison, pheasants and mallard duck 
raised on licensed game farms and preserves which can 
be sold in New York State throughout the year but 
coming from points outside of New York State preserves 
must also have the New York State License in order to 
be permitted to ship in this State and be sold here. 

\lfyou have game to sell, let us hear from you. 

House of A. SUZ 
414-420 West 14th Street -:- NEW YORK CITY 

Cable Address, SILZ, NEW YORK, Telephone, CHELSEA 4900 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters : "Yours for More Game." 



60 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Wild Mallard Ducks 
and Ringneck Pheasants "iM^m: 

WRITE FOR PRICES 



Scarboro Beach Game Farm 

R. E. BULLOCK, Manager 

SCARBORO, - MAINE 

Member of the Game Guild 

We Furnish Eggs in Season 



^tv^i 




ssusfc. .'f^smr'-- 



PROFITS IN FUR FARMING 

Learn about the wonderful Black Fox 
Industry which has proven so profitable 
to breeders. 

Read the Black Fox Magazine, the only 
paper of its kind in the world. 

SAMPLE COPY FREE. 
Subscription $1.50 per year. 

THE BLACK FOX MAGAZINE 

1 5 Whitehall Street, New York 




Established 1860 Telephone 4569 Spring 

FRED SAUTER 

Leading Taxidermist of America 
42 Bleecker Street New York City 

Corner Lafayette Street Subway Station at the Door 

Specialist in All Branches of Taxidermy 

Write for Illustrated Catalogue 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game.' 



THE GAME BREEDER 



61 




'»»- I-*" »'lO:» JS S 



WE HAVE 



Sale 



Silver, Golden, Ring- 
neck, Lady Amherst, 
Formosan, White, 
Mongolian, Reeves, 
Swinhoe, Versicolor, Impeyan, Soem- 
mering, Manchurian Eared, Melano- 
tus, Black Throat Golden, Linneated 
and Prince of Wales Pheasants. 

Wild Turkeys, Japanese Silkies, 
Longtails, Mallard Ducks, S. C. Buff 
and Blue Orpingtons and R. 1. Reds. 
Five varieties of Peafowl, Crane, 
Swan, Fancy Ducks, Doves, Deer, 
Jack Rabbits. 

Send $1.00 fornew Colortppe Catalogue. Where 

purchase amounts to $10.00, price of 

catalogue refunded. 

CHILES & COMPANY 

MT. STERLING KENTUCKY 

Member of The Game Guild 
Member of The American Game Breeders Society 



THE BEST PART 

One reader told us the advertisements 
were the best part of the magazine. We 
agreed to this and we regard it as com- 
plimentary to the editors, since it must 
be good editing to hold a lot of advertis- 
ing for a comparatively small circle of 
readers. The reason, of course, is, we 
attract and hold all the big purchasers 
whose business is worth while. 



GOOD ADVICE 

All game keepers, we know, advise 
buying from those who advertise in the 
magazine which made it legal for the 
places where they are employed to oper- 
ate. 

When a number of game keepers were 
discharged and the preserves were closed 
on account of the Waldorf-Astoria case 
we decided it was time to take the part 
of those who wished to produce food 
and to give employment to many people 
in the country. 



FOR SALE, WELL-BRED SETTERS 

Dogs Trained for Shooting. 
Young Dogs Suitable for Training. 

WRITE FOR PRICES 

THE RIVER LAWN KENNELS 

Grand Island Erie Co., New York 

Member of The Game Guild 



DOGS 



HOUNDS— ALL KINDS. BIG 50 PAGE CATALOGUE 
10£. ROOKWOOD KENNELS, Lexington, Kentucky. 

THE BLUE GRASS FARM KENNELS, of Berry, Ky., 
offer for sale setters and pointers, fox and cat hounds, 
wolf and deer Hounds. Coon and opossum hounds, var- 
mint and rabbit hounds, bear and lion hounds, also Aire- 
dale terriers. All dogs shipped on trial, purchaser to 
judge the quality, satisfaction guaranteed or money re- 
funded. Sixty page, highly illustrated, instructive and 
interesting catalogue for ten cents in stamps or coin. 

AIREDALE TERRIERS. The genuine one-man dog. 
Pedigreed, registered pups. Males $25.00. Females, 
$15.00. Guaranteed Satisfactory. L. E. GALLUP, 2200 
Ogden, Omaha, Nebraska. 



GOOD WORK 

My little ad sold the two dogs a game 
keeper writes from Arden. 

It must be evident that the people who 
own and shoot thousands of game birds 
are the ones who will buy dogs. 



TWO YOUNG LABRADOR RETRIEVERS FOR 
sale. Dog and Bitch. Apply, THOMAS BRIGGS, 

Arden, New York. 3t 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters : "Yours for More Game." 



62 



THE GAME BREEDER 




WILD TURKEYS 

Pure Bred Wild Turkeys 
Eggs in Season 

MARY WILKIE 

Beaver Dam, Virginia 

Member cf the Game Guild 




PHEASANTS, PIGEONS AND 
EGGS. 

Pheasants, Amherst, Silver, Gold- 
en, Reeves, Mongolian, Swinhoe, 
Versicolor, Ringnecks, Cochin 
Bantams, White King Pigeons. 
Eggs in Season. 
BLUE RIBBON POULTRY AND PHEASANT FARM 
Davenport Neck, Phone 655, New Rochelle, N. Y. 
Member of the Game Guild. 



REGISTERED BLACK FOXES, 
TROUT & HARES. 
Rugged pups, bred on highest 
ranch in America. 1917 Breeding 
Record. 8 litters from 8 females. 
Also Mountain Brook Trout. Milch 
Goats. Belgium and Flemish Hares. 

BORESTONE MOUNTAIN 
FOX RANCH 
Onawa - Maine 
ber of the Game Guild. 




Mem 



MALLARDS 



AND BLACK DUCKS. 

Guaranteed Pure Bred Wild 
Ducks. Eggs in season. 15 Mal- 
lard eggs, $4.00, 100 eggs $25. 
15 Black Duck eggs, $8.00, 
100 eggs, $35. 

F. B. DUSETTE, 
Bad Axe, Michigan. 

Order Breeding Stock now to be 
grown for next season. There is 
a limit on Pure Wild stock. 

Member of the Game Guild. 

Do not write for prices or infor- 
mation. Send check. If birds do not please you 
return them and your money will be returned at once. 





LIVE^GAME, ELK, DEER, WILD 
Turkeys, Quail, Pheasants, 
Ducks, and all other game. Eggs 
in season. See space advertise- 
ment. 

W. J. MACKENSEN.Yardley, Pa. 
Member of the Game Guild. 






DARK MALLARD 
Black Duck, Mallard Hybrids Sj™ 
These ducks are reared on free range «*■* 
especiallyfor shooting and for decoys. 
They are strong on the wing. Big 
egg producers under control 
Price $3.50 per pair ; $1 .75 each 

ALBERT F. HOLMES 
8 Bosworth St., Boston, Mass. 

Member of the Game Guild 



BREEDER OF FANCY PHEASANTS 

Eggs in season. Amhersts, Silver, 
Golden, Versicolor, Mongolian, 
Reeves', Ringnecks, Manchurian, 
Elliott, Swinhoe, Impeyan, Mela- 
notus, Soemmering. 

GRAY'S 
GOLDEN -^r POULTRY FARM 
Gifford Gray, Orange, New Jersey 

Member of the Game Guild. 



DR. FRANK KENT 

Importer Bob White Quail 

San Antonio, Texas. 

Book your orders now for early 

Fall and Spring delivery. 

Bank references. 

Member of the Game Guild. 



SEA CLIFF PHEASANTRY 
We have nearly all. of the rare pheas- 
ants and cranes, also white, Java and 
black shouldered Japanese Peafowl. 
Mandarin ducks. Eggs in Season for 
sale. Write for prices and particu- 

BALDWIN PALMER 
Villa Serena, Sea Cliff, Long Island, N. Y. 

Member of the Game Guild. 6t 



PHEASANTS 
ENGLISH, RINGNECKS 

Pearl White Guineas and White 

Cochin Bantams 
Baby Pheasants and Eggs in Season 

THE HIRSCH POULTRY YARDS 

45th Place, Lyons, Illinois 



WILD DUCKS 

The practical rearing of wild ducks 
is fully described in the illustrated 
book, "Our Wild Fowl and Waders, " 
written by the Editor of the Game 
Breeder. Price $2.00 post paid. 

THE GAME CONSERVATION 

SOCIETY, Publishers 

150 Nassau St., New York 






In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Gmm.' 



THE GAME BREEDER 



63 



V&Nfc 





GAME BIRDS 

All American game birds are fully 

described in the illustrated book, 

"Our Feathered Game," written by 

the Editor of the Game Breeder 

Price $2.00 

For sale by 

THE GAME CONSERVATION 

SOCIETY 

150 Nassau St., New York 



GOLDEN, SILVER, AMHERST, 
REEVES and RINGNECK 
PHEASANTS. 
All pure bred, strong healthy birds. 
Must be seen to be appreciated. 
Prices reasonable. Eggsin season. 

THOS. F. CHESEBROUGH 
Northport, Long Island, N. Y. 



WATER FOWL. 

I can supply nearly all species 
of wild water fowl and eggs at 
attractive prices. Mallards, Pin- 
tails, Teal, Canvasbacks, Red 
Heads, Gadwalls, Widgeons, 
Spoonbills, Canada Geese, Snow 
Geese and other wild ducks and 
geese. Write, stating what you 
want. 

GEORGE J. KLEIN, Naturalist 
Ellinwood, Kansas 




Mallard-Pintail 



PHEASANTS AND 

PHEASANT EGGS. 

We have Ringnecks and ten 
other species of Pheasants. 
Eggs in season. One day 
old pheasant chicks 65 
cents each. Flemish Giants 
and other rabbits. 

THE MAPLE GROVE PHEASANTRY AND 
STOCK FARM, 43ldenAve., Pelham Manor, 
Member of the Game Guild. 




PET 
N.Y. 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 

Announcements inserted under this head in small type for 3 cents per word. 
If displayed in heavy type, 5 cents per word. No advertisement accepted for less 
than 30 cents. Postage stamps accepted in payment. 



THE GAME 

150 Nassau Street 



BREEDER 

New York City 



FOR SALE 
These Pheasants will be in full plumage this fall : 4 pair 
Silvers, $3000 ; 2 extra hens, $10.00. 1 pair Swinhoes, 
$35 00. 1 pair Mongolian, »7.00; 3 extra cocks, $600. 
10 Ringneck hens, $30.00 ; 4 Ringneck cocks, $5.00 3 pair 
Lady Amhersts, $50-00 ; 1 extra cock, $10 00. 1 pair Gold- 
ens, $8.00 ; 3 extra hens, $15.00. 1 pair Reeves, S15.00 : 
2 extra hens, $20. 00. 5 pair Canada geese, 5 years old, 
$35.00. 6 pair Redheads, $50 00 ; 1 pair Baldpates, $5 00 ; 
1 pair Pintails, $300. 1 pair wood ducks, $12 50 ; 1 pair 
Mandarin ducks, $12 50. 1 pair Mexican tree ducks, $12.50. 
M. R. CHEESMAN, Murray, Utah, R F.D. No. 3. Box 61. 

FOR SALE— PET FEMALE COON. GUARANTEED 

breeder, three years old. Had five last litter. Stamp 

for reply. BEN BOWMAN, Monroe Ave., Canton, Ohio 

It 

RABBIT AND HARE SOCIETY OF CANADA. 

Breeders should write for constitution and by-laws. 

JOHN E. PEART, Secretary, Hamilton, Ontario. 12t 

WILL SELL THREE PAIR GOLDEN PHEASANTS, 

full plumage, $5.00 each bird; four pair Silver Pheasants, 
$400 each; Lady Amhersts; $6 00 each, this year's hatch. 
Golden Pheasants this year's hatch, $4.00 each. Prices un- 
changeable and for either sex. No attention given to price 
inquiries. G. L. DAVIS, Mt. Sinai, Long Island, N. Y. at 



LIVE GAME 

WILD TURKEYS — For prices see display advertisement 
in this issue. W. J. MACKENSEN, Yardley, Bucks 
County, Pa. 

PHEASANTS FOR SALE-RINGNECKS, SILVER, 
Goldens, Mongolians, Formosan, Prince of Wales, Lady 
Amhersts, Reeves, Swinhoe«, Melanotus, Versicolor, Man- 
churian Eared. ROBINSON BROS., Aldershot, Ontario, 
Canada. 3t 

PURE BRED WILD Wa'1 ERFOWL AT FOLLOW. 

ing prices: Mallards. $3.75 per pair. Pintails, $3 25 per 
pair. Green Wing Teal, $5.00 per pair. Blue Wir g Teal, 
$3 75 per pair. Also redheads, Gadwalls, Widgeons, 
Canvasbacks. Spoonbills, at reasonable prices, for propa- 
gating and scientific purposes. GEORGE J. KLEIN. 
Ellinwood, Kansas. 



FOR SALE-THREE PAIRS OF WOOD DUCKS. 
GLENN CHAPMAN, 882 Lake Street, Newark, N. J. 3 t 

HOYT'S CALIFORNIA PHEASANTRY, PRICE LIST. 
FRED D. HOYT, Hayward, California. 



GRAY STAR PHEASANTRY 
Breeder of ail kinds of pheasants. Eggs in season. 
Pure brand, strong, healthy birds for sale. GIFFORD 
GRAY, 21 Ward St., Orange, N. J. 



FOR SALE — Pheasants and eggs. Everything in the 
pheasant family. Pamphlet with order free. BUCK- 
WOOD PHEASANTRIES, Dunfield, Warren Co., New 
Jersey. (iot) 

QUAIL, PARTRIDGES, WILD FOWL, DEER AND 

other animals. See display advertisement in this issue. 
WM. J. MACKENSEN, Proprietor Pennsylvania Pheas- 
antry and Game Park. 

CANADA WILD GEESE AND THEIR GOSLINGS— 
A limited numjper for sale now — the surest way to start 
breeding this species. We are the oldest and largest 
breeders of Canadas in this country. Black and White 
Swans, Wild Duoks, etc., for sale. WHEALTON WATER 
FOWL FARMS, Chincoteague Island. Va. 

FOR SALE — PURE BRED RINGNECK PHEAS- 
ants. one pet black bear, one pair Canadian Wild Geese 
fine mated old pair Toulouse Geese, also white collie pups 
Also blue peafowl. JOHN TALBOT, South Bend. 
Indiana. It 

WANTED— WHITE PEAFOWL, EITHER SEX. 
Pied Peafowl, Soemmerring, Cheer, Hcki and German 
Peacock Pheasants. Ruffed Grouse, and White Squirrels. 
Also Swinhoes; state price and number. R. A. CHILES 
& CO.. Mt Sterling. Ky. 

HAND RAISED MALLARD DUCK AND DRAKES, 
$1.50 each. JOHN KIERSCHT, Logan, Iowa. 2t 



Pheasants Wanted 



WANTED. ELLIOTT, MIKADO, SATYR, TRAGOPAN 

and Linneated Pheasants. Mature birds only 

Write A. 3. MERLE, Alameda, Cal. o{ 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Gam*.** 



64 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Notice to Purchasers. 

Purchasers can rely upon advertisers in The Game Breeder. The Game Conservation 
Society has a committee known as the Game Guild, which investigates complaints promptly 
and insists upon fair dealing under a penalty of dismissal from membership and the loss of the 
right to advertise in the magazine. There are very few complaints in a year, for the most 
part due to shipments of eggs. These have been uniformly adjusted to the satisfaction of the 
seller and purchaser. Any member making a complaint should state that in placing his order 
he mentioned the fact that it was due to an advertisement in The Game Breeder. All mem- 
bers of the Society are urged to buy from those who support the publication by advertising 
in it. 



FOR SALE — PURE mongolian pheasants 
i C. W. SIEGLER, Bangor, Wisconsin. 2t 

CHINESE. RINGNECK AND MONGOLIAN CROSS, 
Cocks $200, hens $4.00. Golden and Silver, young cocks 
$3 00, hens #5.00. Golden, old cocks »4.00, hens $6.00 
Wild geese and ducks. CLASSIC LAKE WILD FOWL 
FARM, Manzanita, Oregon. 3 t 

THE BLACK SIBERIAN HARE IS OF ENORMOUS 
size. It grows faster, matures and breeds earlier than 
any other rabbit, but best of all is its delicious meat and 
beautiful fur. Write for information and prices. 
SIBERIAN FUR FARM, Hamilton, Canada. 6t 

GLENWOOD PHEASANTRIES, HADLYME, CONN. 

Ringneck phaesant eggs for sale. Price $25.00 per 100 

R. K. McPHAIL. 4t 



FOODS 



WILD DUCK FOODS 

Wild duck food plants, and seed. Wild Celery. Sago 
Pond Weed, Widgeon grass, Red head grass, Chara 
and other kinds. 

There are hundreds of thousands of acres of water 
marshes where these, the best of duck foods, will grow 
and hold the game. Write and learn how to do it. 
WHITE'S GAME PRESERVE, Waterlily, N. C. 
Currituck Sound. 



ACORNS 

An excellent food for deer, pheasants and wild ducks. 
I can supply acorns by the bushel or in large lots. 
Write for prices, including shipping charges. W. R. 
McLEAN, R. F. D., Eagle Springs, North Carolina. 



BOOKS 



FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE — " THE HANDY, 
Volume Encylopaedia Britannica,"» 11th Edition, 29 
beautiful volumes, full leather bound. Thin paper edition, 
stamped in gold. Good as new, most of the volumes have 
been opened only a few times. Will sell or exchange for 
pair of Swinhoe or Elliott Pheasants. Address NED 
PEACOCK, McArthur, Ohio. It 



GAMEKEEPERS 



WISH CHANGE OF POSITION AS POULTRY 

man or gamekeeper by married man. No children. 
Life experience, four years at present position, excellent 
references. L. W. WERTHEIM, Hillsboro, N. C. It 

HEAD GAMEKEEPER'S SON SEEKS SITUATION 

as gamekeeper. 11 years experience and 11 years good 

references. Understands all duties. Age 25 years. Apply 

DAVID GORDON, Hadlyme, Conn. It 

WANTED — POSITION AS MANAGER ON GAME 
farm or shooting preserve. Long experience raising 
game birds. Understand raising and training shooting 
dogs, and trapping vermin. A S. B., care of Game 
Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York, N. Y. 



WANTED. SITUATION AS GAMEKEEPER. Ex- 
perienced on game rearing and dog training. Married. 
Apply H. care of THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau 
St., New York. 

GAMEKEEPER DESIRES SITUATION, THOR- 

oughly understands all duties, etc. Best references 

from Europe and this country. M. J. F., caie of The 

Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York City. 4t 

WANTED SITUATION— A GAMEKEEPER FAMIL- 
iar with pheasant and poultry rearing. I have also had 
experience in general farming and can plan the planting 
for game. BRUCE LANE, care of Game Breeder, 150 
Nassau St., New York. 6t 
1 : 

GAMEKEEPER WANTS A POSITION FOR THE 

coming season on a game farm, club or estate. English, 
age 26, single, no draft, experience in rearing all birds of 
game and poultry, care of dogs and fish, trapping ot 
vermin. Good references from England and this country. 
WILFRED BUTLER, Easton Game Farm, Danielson, 
Conn. 2t 



MISCELLANEOUS 



EXCELLENT OPPORTUNITY FOR GAMEKEEPER. 

Wanted, a Gamekeeper skilled in Pheasant breeding to 
rear large numbers of pheasants on a game ranch. Salary 
and commission will be paid. For particulars write to 
GAME FARM, care of Game Breeder. 



RINGNECK PHEASANTS, $5.00 A PAIR. GOLDENS, 
$10.00 a pair. Guarauteed strong and in the pink of con- 
dition for Spring breeding. Order now as I have a limited 
supply of birds. LILLIAN E. GALLUP, 2209 Ogden, 
Omaha, Nebraska. it 



FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE — OFFER EVERY 
pigeon I have left including one pair Saddle Fans, two 
pair Runts, one pair Pigmy Pouters, five pair Carneaux, 
total twenty-two birds; value over sixty dollars, at bar- 
gain price ; or will exchange for young male New- 
loundland, Great Dane, St. Bernard, or some large breed. 
Reason for selling am retiring from fancy. ALFRED 
LEVINE, Attorney, Nashville, Tennessee. 

"THE RANCH BRED FOX," THE BEST BOOK 

published on Fox farming. Tells all about this wonderful 
industry. Price 25c, postpaid. THE BLACK FOX 
MAGAZINE, 15 Whitehall St., New York. 



ALL GAME BREEDERS SHOULD REMEMBER 
that Meal Worms are just as choice a food for the old 
birds as for the young; ot course, as a rule, thev are not 
fed to the old because lhe> will live without them, except 
occasionally by a man of means, who does not believe in 
depriving his biids of an occasional luxury. However, a*l 
bret-ders should keep on hand a pan or two of meal worms, 
to feed to their old birds when a little out ot sorts, at 
moulting time or when being dosed with drugs. Meal 
worms are an excellent tonic, because a natural insect food. 
500 at 81.00, 1,000 at $1.50, 5,000 at $5. 00. All express pre- 
paid. C. B. KERN, 10 East Main Street, Mount Joy, 
Pennsylvania. It 



In writing 1 to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters : "Yours for More Game." 




Quail, Bobwhites and Other Species 

NOW IS THE TIME TO BUY QUAIL FROM 

Mackensen Game Park 

I carry the largest stock in America of live 
game birds, ornamental birds and quadrupeds. 

Also Pheasant Eggs by the 1 00 & 1 000 

I am prepared to fill the largest orders for Pheasants 
ind Eggs, and for years I have filled practically all of 
the large State orders for both Partridges and Pheasants. 

All Pheasant Eggs Are from My Own Pens 

Pheasants 

My Pheasant pens hold thousands of 
Pheasants and I am prepared to furnish 
these birds in large numbers to State de- 
partments, individual breeders and preserves. 

Wild Duck 

Mallards, Black Duck, Teal, Wood-Duck, Pintails and other species 

can be supplied in large numbers at at- 
tractive prices. Also Mandarins and all 
other water fowl. 

Now is the Time to Buy Wild Turkey Eggs 

AND 

Wild Turkeys 

I am now the largest breeder and 
dealer in Wild Turkeys and can supply 
these birds in good numbers to State 
Departments and preserve owners. 

I carry the largest stock in America of ornamental birds and animals. My ponds now contain nearly 300 beat 
Royal Swans of England. I have tine lot of the beautiful pink FLAMINGOES and the very large Europeaa 
PELICANS. Also STORKS, CRANES, PEAFOWL, fancy GEESE and DUCKS. My pheasant pens contain over 
a thousand Ringneck and fancy PHEASANTS. All stock is kept under practically natural conditions. I have 60 acre* 
of land entirely devoted to my business. Can also promptly furnish BUFFALOES, DEER, LLAMAS, RABBITS, etc. 

Orders booked during summer. 

I have for years filled practically all the large State Orders and have better 
facilities for handling large orders than any other firm. 

Write me before buying elsewhere — it will pay you to do so. Your visit solicited. 
1 am only 60 miles from New York and 30 miles from Philadelohia 





Department V. 



WM. J. MACKENSEN 

YARDLEY, 



BUCKS COUNTY, PA. 

Member of The Game Guild 




SmoAelesgfhofgun 



INFALLIBLE 




"E. cr 



HIGH Ct'N 
PREMIER 



Remington, 

ARROW 

NITKO CI.UB 



SELBY LOADS 

CHALLENGE GRADE 
SUPERIOR GRADE 



/ ffi, BLACK SHELLS 

^■^ AJAX 
■ CLIMAX 



HELD 
RECORD 



"Winchester 

REPEATER 
LEADER 



IN ANY 
ONE OF 



IDEAL 
TARGET 




ARROW 

Nil RO CI.UB 



SELBY LOAD 9 

CHALLENGE GRADE 
SUPERIOR GRAM 



# 



BLACK SHELLS 



FIELD 
RECORD 



TffitNCJf£STER 

REPEATER 
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$>lg g PerYear 

lllllllumilllllHllllllll)IIIIHIIHHr~ 




|""»'» m » ' iiiiniiiiiiiiHMimii 



Single Co pies 10 $ 




THE- 



Q AH E BREEDER 



VOL. XIV 



DECEMBER, 1918 





The- Object op this magazine- is 
to Make- North America the 5iggest 
Gahe Producing Country in the World 





CONTENTS 



Survey of the Field — After the War — The More Game and 
Fewer Game Laws Victory — Future Plans — The Work of the 
Year — A New Shooting Club— Bad News. 



The Blue Quail 
Breeding Gambel's Quail 



Elliot Coues 
C. W. Siegler 



Amendments to the Treaty Act Regulations 

President Woodrow Wilson 

Notes from the Game Farms and Preserves - By Our Readers 

Two Broods of Grouse — Wild Ducks — Unique Trap for 
Rabbits — Beaver Replaces Beef and Bacon — A Suggestion 
for Wild Duck Farmers — Country Homes — Proposed 
Amendments — The State Game Departments— The Farm- 
er's Chief Enemy — Beaver Require Attention in Minne- 
sota — Incubators — The Wood-Tick — Birds Wanted. 

Editorials — Two Important Regulations— Who Owns the Game— 
An Important V — Shall the Ruffed Grouse Become a Song- 
Bird? 

Outings and Innings, Trade Notes, Etc. 



Published Monthly. Entered as second-class matter, July q, 1915, at the Post Office, 
New York City, New York, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 




>S*« 



PUBLISHED BY 



THE* GAME- CONSERVATION SOCIETY. Inc. 

NEW YORK CITY U.Sj* CS>^j-tf 



iiitll{iMIIHillil[lllfltlll!ll!SIIIIII!llllllll!ifl!IIIIIIUIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIfll!IIIHirillllll(lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllinillHIIIHilHI[l!ll>, I i 




AS A CHANGE, TRY 

SPRATT'S 

WAR RODNIM No. 1 

A granulated dog food of great value containing a 
large percentage of meat. 




Spratt's Foods Are Worth Fighing For 

AS A STAPLE DIET, WE RECOMMEND 

SPRATT'S 

WAR RODNIM No. 

A granulated food which is daily becoming 
popular amongst dog owners. 



2 



Write for Samples and Send 2c stamp for "Dog Culture" 



SPRATT'S PATENT LIMITED 

NEWARK, NEW JERSEY 

San Francisco St. Louis Cleveland Montreal 

Factory also in London, England 



THE GAME BREEDER 



65 



on 



w""iii 




-" 



Mark X before subject that interests you 
and Mai! This Coupon to 

E. I. DU PONT DE NEMOURS & CO. 

Advertising Division 
Wilmington G. B. Delaware 





Trapshooting 


Trapshooting for Women 


Trapshooting League 


Du Pont Sporting Powders 


Farm Explosives 


Py-ra-lin Toilet Goods 


Challenge Collars 


Town and Country Paint 


Auto Enamel 


Rayntite Top Material 


Craftsman Fabrikoid 


Fairfield Rubber Cloth 


Commercial Acids 






Add 




City 
Stat 











Visit the Du Pont Products Store 
1105 Boardwalk, Atlantic City,N. J. 



He Learned to Hit 'Em 
at the Gun Club 

Back home he was a trapshooter. At the 
gun club he learned how to hit moving objects, 
ninety times out of a hundred. 

Stopping a hand grenade in mid-air or drop- 
ping a charging Hun is "old stuff" for him. 

At the cantonments and aviation camps in 
the U. S. and France regulation 

TRAPSHOOTING 

at clay targets is a recognized part of the training. 
And with the enemy trenches a few yards distant the 
bayoneted trench shotgun is proving a most efficient 
weapon of defense or offense. 

Whether for prospective active service or home 
defense you can learn to " shoot and hit " at one of 
the thousand of gun clubs in this country. You will 
be welcomed at any club by good Americans who 
will loan you a gun and teach you how to handle it 
with skill. 

For address of nearest club and Trapshooting In- 
struction Book check trapshooting in the coupon, sign 
your name and mail it now to 

E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co. 

Established 1802 

Wilmington 



Delaware 




■"•""""""•WW,, 

jy Pitts 

'""WW 



in: 



ooiinaociD 



no 



66 THE GAME BREEDER 



OUR WILD FOWL AND WADERS 

THE NEW YORK TIMES 

"The subject is the development of a new crop -a flesh crop which has especial 
timeliness in view of the general exhaustion of our food supply. Mr. Huntington dis- 
cusses in the most practical manner the restoration of this crop of feathered game, 
and from the standpoint both of the sportsman and the market gunner, wild ducks, 
it seems, can be raised as easily and cheaply as domesticated duck?, and with 
equally excellent financial results. The way to do this is described with estimates 
of cost and citation of experience abroad, where the deficiency of food supply has 
led to the discovery and elaboration of many remedies to which we have not yet 
been forced. Mr. Huntington's book is illustrated with photographs, interesting 
alike to naturalists and breeders." 

WILLIAM BREWSTER 

"'Our Wild Fowl and Waders' js obviously an able, comprehensive and very 
interesting treatise on a subject which has hitherto received but little attention from 
writers, especially in America, and concerning which naturalists, as well as sports- 
men, will, I am sure, be glad to be thus credibly and pleasingly informed." 

THE LOCKPORT UNION-SUN 

" Mr. Huntington has given to the American people an admirable treatise on the 
practical methods of making these splendid and desirable birds profitably plentiful. 
Ponds, streams and waste lands which do not pay the meagre taxes upon them can 
be utilized and be made to yield both handsome profits and good sport. This 
American authority on wild game tells the farmers and land owners of this country 
how to do it." 

CHARLES HALLOCK 

" The wild fowl book is valuable, clearsighted and scholastic. It is a direct 
appeal to sportsmen of common sense and generous behavior, and they will readily 
absorb its comprehensive pages and act accordingly— and live thereby." 

DR. R. W. SHUFELDT 

" I have enjoyed the treat in my reading of this book from frontispiece to finish 
and I wager anybody else will enjoy it. . . . The author has placed every sports- 
man, every naturalist and a great many other citizens of other callings squarely under 
obligations to him. The book is a direct and logical argument setting forth the 
means for the preservation in the future of our wild fowl and waders. . . . The 
illustrations are judiciously selected, interesting and materially add to the value of 
the volume." 

A. A. HILL 

" This is not only a readable book, but it is important in an economic sense, and 
it will especially appeal to all who are interested in the conservation of wild life, and 
especially our game birds." 

AUTOMOBILE DEALER AND REPAIRER 

" If the advice of Dwight W. Huntington, pioneer and apostle of the movement 
in this country for a rational game protection and conservation, be acted upon, the 
time is coming speedily when game will be as cheap as beef or mutton. At present, 
after fifty years of legal protection, we have no game to amount to anything save in 
the more remote sections. . . . The book is not only instructive in an economic 
sense, showing how to make wild duck preserves safe and attractive, how to get 
stock and eggs and the food required, but is delightful reading for all. The author 
of ' Our Wild Fowl and Waders' is doing a great public service in his campaign 
for more game." 

Our Wild Fowl and Waders will be sent to any address in the United States 
or Canada with The Game Breeder for one year upon receipt of $2.00. 

THE GAME CONSERVATION SOCIETY 

150 NASSAU STREET, N. Y. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



i <\ 



THE GAME BREEDER 



67 



Wctproof Shotshells- 

HOW THEY ARE MADE 




\\ M 






Your Favorite 
:: Shot Shells :: 

How They Are Made 

RciminJton UMC Wctproof 
Arrow and Kitro Cluh 
Steel Lined "Speed SKells" 



THE great fraternity of sports- 
men showed immediate interest 
in Remington UMC Steel Lined 
Wetproof Shotshells when the an- 
nouncement was made that a 
method of making shells absolutely 
waterproof had been found. 

Every shooter realizes that the 
elimination of swollen bodies and 
softened cases and crimps in his 
shotshells means good shooting 
either in rainy or fair weather. 



The Wetproof Process — this great advance in shotshell 
manufacture —is fully explained in a three-color folder 
entitled "Your Favorite Shotshells — How They Are Made." 
The folder will be sent you on request. It gives in detail 
the various manufacturing stages that render Wetproof 
shells impervious to wet. 

The Wetproof Process is exclusive with Remington UMC. 



Send Today For 



REMINGTON 
UMC 



Wetproof Folder 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 



The Remington Arms Union Metallic Cartridge Co., Inc. 

WOOLWORTH BUILDING, NEW YORK CITY 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



68 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Let your trap gun purchase be a PARKER. 
Be one of the thousands of satisfied PARKER 
Gun users. 




PARKER Guns are made by gun experts. The 
purchaser of a PARKER Gun receives in good sub- 
stantial gun value, the benefits of experience in gun 
manufacturing of over 50 years. 

Once you have used the PARKER, you will never 
be satisfied with anything but the BEST. 

Eventually you will shoot the PARKER. Why not 
now? 

Send for catalogue and free booklet about 20 bore guns. 



PARKER BROS. 

Master Gun Makers MERIDEN, CONN., U. S. A 

New York Salesrooms, 25 Murray Street 



OUR FEATHERED GAME 

A manual on American Game 
Birds with shooting illustrations in 
color, and bird portraits of all 
American Game Birds. 

By D. W. HUNTINGTON 

Editor of The Game Breeder 

PRICE $2.00 



Our Big Game 

A manual on the big game of 
North America wi'h pictures of all 
big game animals. 

By D. W. HUNTINGTON 

Editor of the Game Breeder 

PRICE $2.00 



THREE THOUSAND 



Chinese-Mongolian Ringneck Pheasants 

FALL DELIVERY 
Full Wing, Healthy, Hardy Birds 

Reeves, Lady Amherst, Golden, 
Silver, Pure Mongolian 

Japanese Silkies, Buff Cochin Bantams 

New Zealand Red Rabbits, Breeding Stock $3.50 Each, Young $2 

We are Breeders Exclusively, and nothing leaves our 
farm that is not right in every particular. 



MARMOT PHEASANTRY 

Member of The Game Guild 
MARMOT, OREGON 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game. 1 



T he Game Breeder 



VOLUME XIV 



DECEMBER, 19 J 8 
SURVEY OF THE FIELD. 



NUMBER 3 



After the War. 

Now that the war is ended we 
should all go in for "more game and 
fewer game laws." 

Many of the vast areas where no game 
occurs or which are posted by the farm- 
ers against all shooting can be made to 
yield game abundantly and profitably for 
pleasure or for profit. 

Often we have pointed out that it will 
Lake very little of the ground where no 
game occurs or where shooting is pro- 
hibited to make North America the big- 
gest game producing country in the 
world. Often we have said that it is 
desirable to have more people living in 
the country and that field sports can be 
made a great inducement to bring about 
the desired result. . During the coming 
year we shall publish many pictures of 
men, women and children who are living 
in the country as the direct result of the 
activity of the Game Conservation So- 
ciety. 



The More Game and Fewer Game 
Laws Victory. 

The movement for more game and 
fewer game laws has been a pronounced 
success. The war had much to do with 
the victory which we now proclaim. At- 
tention was called to the shortage of 
game _ in the country as a food supply 
and this made the addition of section 12 
to the Migratory Bird Law, protecting 
game breeders "in order to increase our 
food supply" an easy matter. 

In nearly all of the States game breed- 
ing is a legal industry. The sportsmen 
who prefer more game to more game 
laws can have just what they want. They 
can shoot during long open seasons ; they 



can fix their own bag limits ; they can 
sell some of the game they produce in 
order to help pay expenses and keep the 
cost of the shooting down. All that is 
necessary to have good shooting on 
places where there is none to-day is to 
deal fairly with the farmers who often 
are willing to permit game breeding and 
shooting for an annual rental of a few 
cents per acre. The State game depart- 
ments whicli properly regulate the sale 
of the game produced will become of 
great economic importance to all of the 
people. They can be made popular not 
only with the farmers and sportsmen but 
also with all of the people who approve 
of food production and who like to eat 
game. Since the production of game 
abundantly on some of the farms and 
about the ponds where no ducks occur 
to-day will be followed by an abundance 
of game on public lands and waters good 
shooting may be predicted for every gun 
in America during long open seasons. 

Numerous game shooting clubs have 
been started and the number of sports- 
men who prefer more game to more game 
laws is increasing rapidly. 

When, shortly before his death, the 
dean of American sportsmen, Charles 
Hallock, wrote to The Game Breeder 
congratulating the society for the tri- 
umph of the movement for more game 
and fewer game laws we were not quite 
sure that the victory was decisive; that 
there might not be a relapse. We were 
aware that a few game law enthusiasts, 
with considerable money invested in 
their industry, still favored the "other- 
wise than by shooting" clause which ap- 
peared in a few game breeding enact- 
ments. We were not quite sure that the 
danger from an extension of this idea 



70 



TI!i: GAME BREEDER 



could be obviated quickly. Section 12 
of the Migratory Bird Law, however, 
has given full protection to game breed- 
ers and sportsmen and when the "other- 
wise" people got busy they ran squarely 
against this wise provision of the statute 
which prevents any interference with 
game breeders and their sporting custom- 
ers. This is exactly what section 12 was 
intended for. We are pleased to observe 
that it meets the approval of all intel- 
ligent state game officers who have not 
altogether favored the running of their 
departments by a small coterie in New 
York, who have appeared to profit by 
preventing food production. Since 
many State laws permit game breeders 
to shoot and sell their game and the ten- 
dency of the courts is to hold that laws 
enacted in order to save the wild, or 
State game, should not be applied to 
game produced by industry or be permit- 
ted to prevent food production, we feel 
quite safe in saying: "The victory has 
been won." All that remains to be done 
is to work out certain details intended to 
distinguish the game owned by breeders 
from the game owned by the State, and 
to provide for the taking of stock birds 
for breeding purposes. Proper regula- 
tions for those who sell the food easily 
can be made. 

Future Plans. 

We are so sure that the State game 
departments will become of great eco- 
nomic importance to all of the people 
and that they will cease arresting food 
producers because they have birds or 
eggs and produce food that we are look- 
ing forward to a quiet home in the coun- 
try where we will be in no fear of arrest 
for profitably producing game on the 
home grounds. 

We look forward with pleasure to re- 
tiring from much of the active work in 
connection with The Game Breeder and 
to undertaking the outdoor occupation, 
and we are not afraid to inform the 
"otherwise" people that our crop will be 
harvested exclusively by shooting. This 
we regard as the proper method of re- 
ducing quail to possession for food pur- 
poses. The birds will be taken with the 



aid of setters and pointers and we expect 
to provide shooting for many friends 
who will not charge us anything for their 
assistance at the harvest time. Thus we 
shall live up to the sentimental maxim 
"sport for sport's sake" just as the trap- 
shooters "live up to their maxim "trap- 
shooting for trapshooting sake," and like 
the trapshooters we expect to have a big 
lot of shooting on our home grounds. In 
order not to be outdone by the sentimen- 
tal outpourings of the more game law 
political sportsmen we shall place on the 
wall over the big wood fire and beneath 
the gun which we carried on the prairies 
many years ago, the motto, "God Bless 
Our Home — in the Country." 

We shall keep up our membership in 
the Long Island Game Breeders' Asso- 
ciation and in several other game breed- 
ing syndicates where we expect always 
to find good shooting at a small cost per 
gun. We shall keep up our interest in 
the many commercial game farms which 
will supply thousands of game birds and 
eggs to the game shooting clubs and we 
shall continue to advise and to help cre- 
ate many new customers for the game 
farms. 

The shooting of large numbers of 
birds is quite necessary to keep the busi- 
ness of the producers good. Game farm- 
ing and "otherwise than by shooting" 
laws are decidedly inharmonious. The 
shooting clubs and preserve owners are 
the best customers of the game farmers 
in all civilized countries and to provide 
that purchasers must not shoot is to pro- 
vide that there will be no customers. 
Game farming under such conditions 
quickly would come to an end. 



The Work of the Year. 

The work of the Game Conservation 
Society during the year now ending has 
been important and effective. Our ap- 
peal for fewer game laws has been 
heeded in many parts of the country. 
Our appeal for more game has resulted 
in a large increase in the numbers of the 
species of game birds which are exempt 
from the laws preventing the production 
and the sale of game. Many breeders of 



THE GAME BREEDER 



71 



quail and other game birds have made 
these birds so abundant that they have 
far more than they can eat. 

The society successfully defended sev- 
eral breeders in the courts who were ar- 
rested for trivial offenses such as pur- 
chasing eggs before their licenses were 
issued, with the result that the arresting 
officers have not been so active as for- 
merly and seem to have learned that it is 
not even good politics to arrest food pro- 
ducers for trivial offenses connected with 
their industry. 

The extended publicity given to a case 
where a fine of $15,000 was collected lie- 
cause a few ducks were trapped for 
breeding purposes had much to do with 
the amendments of State laws so as to 
permit the trapping of birds for food- 
producing purposes, and it was under- 
stood before the Migratory Bird Law 
was enacted that a regulation to be made 
under it would permit the trapping of 
wild ducks so that no more excessive 
fines for attempting to produce food ever 
will be imposed. 

So long as no publicity was given to 
such performances and arresting officers 
and their pals who shared in the fine 
could get away with it quietly, and in 
fact were promoted often because of 
their ability to make such collections, the 
number of such outrageous and shocking 
performances promised to increase rapid- 
ly because they were highly profitable. 
Our publicity has been highly beneficial. 

The number of game breeders has in- 
creased rapidly during the year, so ra- 
pidly in some months that new appli- 
cants for membership in the society could 
not be supplied with the current number 
of The Game Breeder within a few weeks 
after it appeared. 

The usual game dinner of the society 
was not given on account of the war, all 
of our younger men and many of the 
older ones being away. The money 
usually contributed for the dinner was 
invested in wild turkeys, bobwhites, 
Gambel's quail and in the effort to se- 
cure prairie grouse and other game birds 
for breeding purposes. 

The detailed work of breeders written 



for the magazine has induced others to 
undertake similar work and many new 
game farms and preserves have been 
created during the year. We were asked 
to secure gamekeepers for three new 
places in one week. 

Some game farmers and preserve 
owners suspended operations during the 
war. One of our most active members, 
Mr. John Heywood, died shortly after 
writing us about his plans on a new game 
farm which he had started to take the 
place of his old farm at Gardner, Mass. 

The creation of the Long Island Game 
Breeders' Association, a shooting syndi- 
cate with small dues, one dollar a week, 
was perhaps the most notable practical 
event of the year. Sportsmen have for 
so many years been led to believe that 
good shooting soon would be provided 
by numerous new laws that many of 
them never seemed to realize that it 
would be quite as easy to have more 
game as it always was to secure more 
game laws. The political sportsmen pro- 
claiming that shooting was only for the 
rich when game was properly looked 
after, seemed to prevent many sportsmen 
from ascertaining how easy it is to have 
more game and much shooting at small 
expense per gun using lands where game 
of all sorts had ceased to occur. 

Nothing more quickly produces re- 
sults than a practical demonstration and 
the Long Island Association, which is 
managed by a committee of the Game 
Conservation Society, was formed to 
demonstrate how easy it is to have more 
game for those who prefer this to more 
game laws. Many visitors will be enter- 
tained at the farms during the breeding 
season and many new places will be 
started by those who witness the demon- 
stration. It has been suggested that this 
form of the activity of the society be ex- 
tended so as to provide good shooting at 
a fixed sum per day and that at this ex- 
periment station or at another which is 
contemplated the sportsmen be permitted 
to shoot a few birds per day on account 
of their annual permit and a much larger 
number by paying an additional price 
for the extra birds shot ; a small amount 
if the extra birds be marketed, a larger 



72 



THE GAME BREEDER 



sum (the market price) if the birds are 
taken home by the harvester. This pro- 
gram, suggested by a prominent member 
of the society, appeals to us since it illus- 
trates our idea of "sport for sport's 
sake," true sport being generous and will- 
ing to shoot something for the people who 
do not shoot, to eat. The old style inter- 
pretation of the adage sport for sport's 
sake, that the sportsman should only 
shoot what he could personally eat in a 
day and that he should put in the rest of 
the day recreating never appealed to us 
because we like to shoot in the afternoon 
as much as we do in the morning and 
besides we like to entertain generous 
thoughts about those who should expect 
to have some game upon our return. 
Only shooting for sport's sake what the 
shooter's own belly would comfortably 
contain always seemed to be extreme sel- 
fishness. If the adage be applied to deer 
shooting the shooter would have more 
than he could personally eat after one 
shot. 

By far the most important enactment 
during the year was the Migratory Bird 
Law after it was amended so as to. give 
absolute protection to game breeders and 
sportsmen. The regulation made by the 
Secretary of Agriculture permitting the 
trapping and sale of all species of wild 
fowl for breeding purposes and the sale 
by game breeders and sportsmen of the 
birds produced as food is highly cred- 
itable. If the regulation is liberally ex- 
ecuted it will produce a vast amount of 
food for the people, splendid shooting 
for the industrious, and it will be highly 
beneficial to the shooting on public 
waters, since as we have pointed out 
often the breeding and shooting of large 
quantities of ducks will drive many of 
the fowl to public waters where those 
who do not produce anything will find 
excellent shooting. 

The attempt to destroy a good regula- 
tion by the "otherwise than by shooting" 
provision was promptly looked after by 
the Game Conservation Society with 
good results. 

A New Shooting Club. 

A new shooting club was promptly 
formed by people residing in the neigh- 



borhood of the Long Island Game Breed- 
ers' Association with annual due of $10. 
This club we believe does not contem- 
plate breeding game but will rely upon 
the abundance likely to be created by the 
association of breeders. Everyone in the 
neighborhood we believe who wishes to 
shoot can join this club and no doubt 
members from the city are acceptable.- 
This is as it should be. Shooting will Le 
provided for a much larger number of 
guns than possibly could be entertained 
on the ground without exterminating the 
game. The new club may not have the 
benefits which game producers have, 
probably they cannot shoot hen pheasants 
and may be limited to certain days in 
the year, small bags, etc. We predict 
when game becomes plentiful as it will 
they can have more liberal laws or pos- 
sibly they may produce a little on their 
own account and secure the freedom of 
producers. At all events everyone who 
wishes to shoot will find something to 
shoot. 

Bad News. 

While writing these notes about the 
work of the year a message came stating 
that Dwight Huntington, 2d, of The 
Game Breeder's staff, was seriously 
wounded in the last battle in France. 



Now is a very good time to send in 
advertisements of live birds for propa- 
gation and it is an excellent plan to send 
egg advertisements not later than Janu- 
ary. There will be an immense demand 
for eggs next spring and many of our 
readers will order early to be sure of get- 
ting eggs. The demand for quail and 
quail eggs will be especially strong and 
we would urge all of our readers to pur- 
chase all the quail and all the eggs they 
can secure. Quail lay many eggs when 
confined in pens provided the eggs be 
lifted daily and the eggs bring splendid 
prices. 

Game as a food supply quickly can be 
made tremendously abundant. Game as 
the football of politics quickly can be 
kicked out of existence or placed on the 
song bird list. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



73 



THE BLUE QUAIL. 

(The following account of the Blue Quail, the Scaled Quail of the Ornithologists was 
published by the Department of the Interior, U. S. Geological Survey of the Territories. 
Miscellaneous publication No. 3. The late Captain and assistant surgeon, Dr. Coues, made a 
valuable contribution to our Ornithology when he wrote this public document known as The 
Birds of the Northwest, but containing, as in the case of the Blue Quail, something about 
related species residing in the Rio Grande country. — Editor.) 



Blue Quail. Gallipepla Squamata. 

As we have referred the three Ari- 
zonian quails to as many genera, we may 
briefly notice some of the points of their 
structure. That of the Blue Quail is 
most like Gambel's in bill, wings, tail, and 
feet, but entirely different in the crest, 
which, instead of being helmet-like, of 
club-shaped, recurved feathers, is short, 
soft, and full, and, though capable of 
erection in a conspicuous manner, can 
be laid quite flat, out of sight. The Blue 
is also called the Scaled Quail, from the 
peculiar appearance of the plumage of 
the under parts, which is seemingly ab- 
normal in texture or disposition ; but this 
is merely an optical effect of the singu- 
lar coloration of the feathers, simulating 
imbricated scales or tiles. A correspond- 
ing result is said to appear from the 
same cause in the plumage of the under 
parts of young Gannets. The Massena 
Quail has the crest in general similar to 
that of the Blue, but differs from this 
species, as well as from Gambel's, in the 
structure of the wings and tail. These 
are both short ; the wing-coverts and 
tertials are remarkably enlarged, hiding 
the primaries when the wing is closed, 
and the tail-coverts are so long as to 
conceal the true tail feathers, which are 
soft and weak. The Massena is of strik- 
ing and elegant colors, having sharply 
contrasted round spots upon a rich 
ground, and other peculiarities ; both it 
and Gambel's are singularly, almost fan- 
tastically, striped about the head ; the 
Blue is of plainer, though scarcely less 
pleasing tints. Thus each species shows 
some marked features with one of the 
other two, but none of consequence with 
both ; and each has peculiarities of its 
own not shared by either of the others. 



The Blue Quail has another peculiarity 
of a different sort ; the two sexes differ 
but little in appearance. As a general 
rule the sexual differences among galli- 
naceous birds are very striking — more 
so, perhaps, than in any other group. 
Cjntrary to the rule in our own species, 
the male is gaudily attired, while the 
female is of plain and homely appear- 
ance, as well illustrated by the domestic 
cock and hen, and especially by the pea- 
fowls. Among Arizonian Gallinae the 
Massena differs most in sexual distinc- 
tions of color, for the female is quite 
subdued in her dress, while the male is 
showy in coloration. 'The Blue presents 
the other extreme, as if, with tender gal- 
la. ltry, he were unwilling to outshine. 

This species is a bird of noticeably 
terrestrial habits, rarely taking to trees 
or bushes unless hard pressed in one of 
those extremities into which some people 
are fond of forcing any birds large 
enough to be worth a charge of shot and 
wary enough to make it exciting sport to 
penetrate their poor bodies with it. It 
generally trusts to its legs rather than its 
wings, though these are not at all de- 
ficient in size or strength. On level 
ground it glides along with marvellous 
celerity, and makes good progress over 
the most rocky and difficult places. As 
a consequence, it is rather difficult to 
shoot fairly, though it may be "potted" 
in great style by one so disposed ; and 
it will probably require several genera- 
tions in training before it can be taught 
to lie well to a dog. 

Like our other southwestern species, 
the Blue Quail has a rather restricted 
range in the United States. The valley 
of the Rio Grande at large may be given 
as its especial habitat; it is said to be 
more abundant there than I have found 



74 



THE GAME BREEDER 



it to be in other regions. Colonel Mc- 
Call, with that accuracy for which he has 
a well-deserved name, states that this val- 
ley, "though comparatively narrow, con- 
tains a country of great extent from 
north to south, and embraces, in its 
stretch between the Rocky Mountains 
and the Gulf of Mexico, every variety of 
climate, from the extreme of cold to that 
of tropical heat. This entire region, not 
even excepting the narrow mountain val- 
leys, covered in winter with deep snows, 
is inhabited by the species under consid- 
eration. I have met with it on the Rio 
Grande and its affluents from the 25th 
to the 38th degrees of north latitude — ■ 
that is to say, from below Monterey, in 
Mexico, along the borders of the San 
Juan River to its junction with the Rio 
Grande ; and at different points on the 
latter as high up as the Taos and other 
northern branches which gush from the 
mountain sides. I have also found it, 
though less frequently, near the head of 
the Riado Creek, which likewise rises in 
the Rocky Mountains and flows eastward 
to the Canadian." I did not meet with 
the bird near Taos, and we have no 
knowledge of its occurrence so far north 
except that afforded by Colonel McCall's 
observations : T presume this must be the 
extreme limit of its range. The only 
naturalist of the Railroad Surveys who 
appears to have met with it was Dr. 
Heermann. who found it on the San 
Pedro, a branch of the Gila, east of 
Tucson, and thence to Limpia Springs. 



Those of the Mexican Boundary Survey, 
however, all observed it, and Dr. Ken- 
nedy makes the summary statement that 
it was "found everywhere where there 
was permanent water, from Limpia 
Creek, Texas, to San Bernardino, Son- 
ora." Lieutenant Couch records it from 
"about sixty leagues west of Matamoras ; 
not until free from prairie and bottom- 
land ;" and observation confirmed by Mr. 
Clarke, who states that it "does not oc- 
cur on the grassy prairies near the coast." 
I was rather surprised to find- no Blue 
Quail about Fort Whipple, since it 
seemed that that locality was in their or- 
dinary range, and probably my observa- 
tions, or rather want of observations in 
this particular, represent the actual 
truth, as I was repeatedly assured that 
none live there. In Arizona they appear 
really to be confined to what is called 
the "lower country" — that is, to the val- 
leys of the Gila and Colorado, in a re- 
stricted sense. On the latter river it 
must ascend at least as high as Fort 
Mojave ; and to the eastward, to the 
country about the Hassayampa. 

The egg of the blue quail differs in 
color from that of the Calif ornian or 
Gambel's, though of the same size and 
shape. A specimen measures 1.20 by 
1.00; it is buffy-white, or with the faint- 
est possible brownish-yellow tinge, and 
it is very regularly and thickly dotted 
with minute specks of light brown. The 
usual large number are laid for each 
setting. 



BREEDING GAMBEL'S QUAILS. 

By C. W. SlEGLER. 



In the September number of The Game 
Breeder the editor asks the readers who 
are experimenting with California quail 
and others, to write their experiences 
for The Game Breeder. As I have ex- 
perimented with the Gambel quail I shall 
comply with the request and let you know 
about the pair awarded me as first prize 
of live quail. 

This pair of Gambels had been shipped 



to me March 6th and arrived here six 
days later in very good condition. Long 
journeys and captivity in very small 
coops seem to have no bad effect upon 
them. 

When notified that they would be 
shipped, I prepared quarters for them 
fencing off a part of one of my pheasant 
pens for them, a space 16 by 4 by 4 feet, 
sheltered from the north and west, with 



THE GAME BREEDER 



75 



one-mch mesh wire on the sides and over- 
head, with 12 inch baseboard on the west 
side and 2 inch baseboard on the south 
and east sides, onto which the wire is 
stapled. At each end I built a door 2 
by 4 feet, the front door for feeding 
them and the back door for reaching in 
to get the eggs at that end. For my 
pheasant pens one door is sufficient, but 
for quail two doors — one on each end — 
are absolutely necessary. Quail are very 
sensitive to disturbance. " The north 
end of their pen is closed with boards on 
the west and north sides and also cov- 
ered with boards overhead to keep rain 
off, supply them with shade and give 
them a place of refuge. As their pen is 
connected with the pheasant pen on the 
east and south sides, these sides are only 
closed with wire. Quail must have some 
hiding places to keep dogs, cats and also 
strangers from frightening them. For 
that reason I built a platform on the 
north end two feet above the ground, 4 
by 4 feet, and covered this with a layer 
of nice, soft, dry grass, and on this I 
placed some corn stalks and over these a 
thick pile of evergreen boughs, leaning 
to the north end of the pen, with a small 
opening for entrance on both sides. This 
served them as a hiding place and to 
build their nests. Without such a hid- 
ing place it would seem impossible to 
successfully raise Gambel quails in cap- 
tivity. Without hiding places they would, 
when disturbed, dash wildly against the 
wire in every direction, harm themselves 
and very likely break their necks. In 
such places they feel perfectly content 
and safe. 

My quail always preferred this upper 
story of their hiding place. Here they 
would skulk, here they would sleep, and 
here they also made their nests. 

When I first released the quail, they 
were desperately wild, and for the first 
two weeks they would hide as soon as 
any human being approached. By and 
by they became tamer, at last so tame 
that I could stand quite close by and 
watch them eat and dust themselves. 

The Gambel quail never calls Bob- 
white, but has a number of other calls. 



Its call is hard to write down on paper. 
To my ear its general call sounds like 
this : A-ge-ha. ! A-ge-ha ! When 
alarmed it calls : Tic-tic-tic-tic. When 
mate is lost it calls Ge-ha ! Ge-ha ! fre- 
quently repeating the different calls. 

On May 10 the hen layed her first egg 
in a hollow of the grass underneath the 
evergreen boughs on the platform. The 
nest was well hid. Thereafter she layed 
nine more eggs on the following days : 
May 12, 14, 15, 17, 19, 21, 23, 24,_ 25. 
May 14 and 15 she layed her eggs in a 
nest on the ground underneath the plat- 
form. The other eggs were all layed in 
the same nest on the platform. I never 
made use of any nest egg. I searched 
for the eggs every day towards evening 
from the door near the nest. As I never 
searched for the eggs in the forenoon, 
I can't say whether any were layed at 
that time or not. But I positively know 
that one egg was layed between 4 and 
6 o'clock P. M. The eggs were kept in 
bran on end in a cool cellar and turned 
each day the other end up. 

On May 26, after the hen had layed 
three eggs during the three preceding 
days, I found her dead in her nest ready 
to deposit another egg. I had been feed- 
ing her quite some angle-worms during 
those days, which, as I presume, caused 
excessive laying and, becoming egg- 
bound, caused her death. 

Two days before the last Gambel egg 
was layed I found a nest of Bob-white 
eggs in a strawberry patch out in the 
country. Some bird had just begun to 
rob the nest. One empty egg was lying 
on the ground near the nest and another 
on top of a fence post close by. In order 
to save the rest — seven in number — I 
took them home and put them in bran 
with the Gambel eggs. The eggs are of 
the same size, only more pointed and 
pure white, whereas the color of the 
Gambel eggs is creamy- white, marked 
with blackish brown spots and blotches. 

When the first Gambel egg was eight- 
een days old I began to incubate them. 
Odds were against me. I had no ban- 
tam cluck at that time. Luckily my Lady 
Amherst hen had just become broody 



76 



THE GAME BREEDER 



and had made herself a nest on the 
ground in one of the corners inside of 
her shed. So I placed all of these seven- 
teen eggs in her nest for her to hatch 
them out. And she certainly was a fine 
cluck-. She didn't break a single egg and 
left the nest very seldom, and that but 
for a few moments. 

On the twenty-first day of incubation 
I removed the eggs from the Lady Am- 
herst nest to an incubator running at 103 
degrees. Some of the Gambel and Bob- 
white eggs were pipped that day. On 
June 20, the twenty-fourth dav of incu- 
bation, there were fifteen quail hatched, 
and on June 21 the remaining two also. 
Both of these last hatched — one Bob- 
white and one Gambel — were cripples 
and lived but a few days. I kent the 
young in the machine 24 hours longer. 
Again odds were against me. I thought 
I had a bantam cluck ready for them, but 
when I gave them to her she would not 
accept them, but was very much afraid 
of them. So I took another bantam 
cluck, which had been fostering some 
young pheasants a week already, and 
gave the whole flock of quail to her ; and, 
to my surprise, she readily accepted them 
as though they were her real family. 
But. naturally, such a cluck will not sit 
as tight and quiet on the young any more 
as she ought to, and as clucks will do 
when the young are first hatched. But 
in spite of all that, the young quail grew 
stronger day by day. 

The first few days I kept the cluck 
with the poults in a cracker box, with 
slats in the center through which they 
could run back and forth, the bottom of 
this coop being covered with coarse, dry 
gravel. After a few days I connected 
this coop with a small run, 2 by 4 by 1 
feet, with screen on two sides and also 
covered with screen on top. The bottom 
of this run was also - covered with dry, 
coarse gravel. 

The first few days I fed the quail egg- 
custard and finely cut lettuce. From the 
very first I also gave them clean water 
in a small drinking font. I fed them 
little and often at first, the egg cus- 
tard remaining their principal daily food 



thereafter. This they enjoyed very 
much. 

After a few days I began to feed them 
also maggots and ants' eggs and ants. 
Would take a spade and dig ground of 
ant nest with ants and eggs in it, place 
this in a pail and dump the contents in 
the quail's run. That would keep them 
very busy for hours. When a week old 
1 began to feed them also Spratt's chick 
grain and some timothy and clover seed, 
which I happened to have on hand. 
Every day I would throw in a little finely 
cut lettuce and clover. 

Both the Bob- whites and Gambels 
grew fast. The young Gambels showed 
the plume that decorates their head when 
a few days old. The Bob-whites were 
plumper in size and also quite some 
tamer than the Gambels. 

As I had to leave my home for a 
week on duty, I had to leave my quail 
to the care of my 9-year-old son. He 
took good care of them, but made one 
grave mistake. Instead of only moisten- 
ing the bran, in which the maggots were 
raised, he partly filled the vessel with 
water. This caused the bran to turn 
black and rot. This poisoned the mag- 
gots and the poisoned maggots killed all 
of my quail excepting three. Odds again 
were against me. Hereafter the cluck 
absolutely refused to brood these three 
quail and began to peck them. I there- 
fore took these three — two Gambels and 
one Bob-white — and placed them in the 
pen with the old Gambel cock. And it 
seemed to me as though the old quail 
was very much pleased to have his off- 
spring with him. But Mr. Gambel only 
behaved well as long as I stood and 
watched him. After I was gone he 
showed his three youngsters that he ab- 
solutely allowed no intruders whatever 
in his domain. He killed all three of 
them. When I at that time read that 
the Migratory Bird Bill, with all the 
vicious "teeth" in it, would become a law, . 
I was indeed very glad that the young 
quail were gone. Later on this law was 
changed and the game breeders won. 

The old Gambel cock is still living and 



THE GAME BREEDER 



77 



enjoying life immensely. When the hen 
died I tried to procure another one in 
her place, but was not able to do so. 
The principal food for the old quail is 
mixed chick feed and different kinds of 



greens. My intentions were to release' 
the cluck and the young quail in a large 
enclosure after they had been two weeks 
old, but I had no opportunity to do so 
any more. 



AMENDMENTS OF AND ADDITIONS TO THE MIGRA- 
TORY BIRD TREATY ACT REGULATIONS. 

By the President of the United States of America, 

A Proclamation. 



Whereas, The Secretary of Agriculture, 
pursuant to the authority contained in section 
three of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act 
(Public, No. 186, 65th Congress), and having 
due regard to the zones of temperature and 
to the distribution, abundance, economic value, 
breeding habits, and times and lines of migra- 
tory flight of migratory birds included in the 
terms of the convention between the ■ United 
States and Great Britain for the protection 
of migratory birds, concluded August 16, 1916, 
has determined when, to what extent, and by 
what means it is compatible with the terms of 
said convention to allow hunting, taking, cap- 
ture, killing, possession, sale, purchase, ship- 
ment, transportation, carriage, and export of 
such birds and parts thereof and their nests 
and eggs, and in accordance with such deter- 
minations has adopted and submitted to me 
for approval regulations, additional to and 
amendatory of the regulations approved and 
proclaimed July 31, 1918, which the Secretary 
of Agriculture has determined to be suitable 
amendatory and additional regulations permit- 
ting and governing the hunting, taking, cap- 
ture, killing, possession, sale, purchase, ship- 
ment, transportation, carriage and export of 
said birds and parts thereof and their nests 
and eggs, which said additions and amend- 
ments are as follows : 

* * * 

Regulation 4. — Open seasons on and posses- 
sion of certain migratory game birds. 

Regulation 4, subtitle "Black-bellied and 
golden plpvers and greater and lessor yellow- 
legs," is amended so as to read as follows : 

Black-bellied and golden plovers and greater 
and lesser yellowlegs. — The open seasons for 
black-bellied and golden plovers and greater 
and lesser yellowlegs shall be as follows : 

In Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, 
Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New 
Jersey, Delaware, Maryland and Virginia the 
open season shall be from August 16 to No- 
vember 30 ; 

In the District of Columbia, North Carolina, 
South Carolina, Tennessee, Arkansas. Okla- 
homa, Texas. New Mexico, Arizona, Califor- 
nia and Alaska the open season shall be from 
September 1 to December 15; 



In Vermont, Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Vir- 
ginia, Kentucky, Indiana, Michigan, Wiscon- 
sin, Illinois, Missouri, Iowa, Minnesota, North 
Dakota, south Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, 
Colorado, Wyoming, Montana, Idaho, Nevada 
and that portion of Oregon and Washington 
lying east of the summit of the Cascade 
Mountains the open season shall be from Sep- 
tember 16 to December 31 ; 

In Utah and in that portion of Oregon and 
Washington lying west of the summit of the 
Cascade Mountains the open season shall be 
from October 1 to January 15 ; and 

In Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi 
and Louisiana the open season shall be from 
November 1 to January 31. 

* * * 

Regulation 5. — Bag limits on certain migra- 
tory game birds. 

Regulation 5 is amended so as to read as 
follows : 

A person may take in any one day during 
the open seasons prescribed therefor in Regu- 
lation 4 not to exceed the following numbers 
of migratory game birds. 

Ducks (except wood duck and eider ducks) 
— Twenty-five in the aggregate of all kinds. 

Geese — Eight in the aggregate of all kinds. 

Brant — Eight. 

Rails, coot and gallinules (except sora) — 
Twenty-five in the aggregate of all kinds. 

Sora — Fifty. 

Black-bellied and golden plovers and greater 
and lesser yellowlegs — Fifteen in the aggre- 
gate of all kinds. 

Wilson snipe, or jacksnipe — Twenty-five. 

Woodcock — Six. 

Doves (mourning and white-winged) — 
Twenty-five in the aggregate of both kinds. 

* * * 

Regulation 6 — Shipment and transportation 
of certain migratory game birds. 

Regulation 6 is amended so as to read as 
follows : 

Waterfowl (except wood duck, eider ducks 
and swans), rails, coot, gallinules, black- 
bellied and golden plovers, greater and lesser 
yejlowlegs, woodcock, Wilson snipe or jack- 
snipe, and mourning and white-winged doves 
and parts thereof legally taken may be trans- 



78 



THE GAME BREEDER 



ported in or out of the State where taken 
during the respective open seasons in that 
State, and may be imported from Canada dur- 
ing the open season in the Province where 
taken, in any manner, but not more than the 
number thereof that may be taken in two days 
by one person under these regulations shall 
be transported by one person in one calendar 
week out of the State where taken ; any such 
migratory game birds or parts thereof in 
transit during the open season may continue 
in transit such additional time immediately 
succeeding such open season, not to exceed 
five days, necessary to deliver the same to 
their destination ; and any package in which 
migratory game birds or parts thereof are 
transported shall have the name and address 
of the shipper and of the consignee and an 
accurate statement of the numbers and kinds 
of birds contained therein clearly and con- 
spicuously marked on the outside thereof ; but 
no such birds shall be transported from any 
State, Territory or District to or through an- 
other State, Territory or District, or to or 
through a Province of the Dominion of Can- 
ada contrary to the laws of the State, Terri- 
tory, or District, or Province of the Dominion 
of Canada in which they were taken or from 
which they are transported ; nor shall any such 
birds be transported into any State, Territory, 
or District from another State, Territory, or 
District or from any State, Territory, or Dis- 
trict into any province of the Dominion of 
Canada at a time when such State, Territory, 
or District, or Province of the Dominion of 
Canada prohibits the possession or transporta- 
tion thereof. 

% % * 

Regulation 8 — Permits to propagate and sell 
migratory waterfowl. 

Paragraph 2 of Regulation 8 is amended so 
as to read as follows : 

2. A person authorized by a permit issued 
by the Secretary may possess, buy, sell, and 
transport migratory waterfowl and their in- 
crease and eggs in any manner and at any 
time for propagating purposes ; and migratory 
waterfowl, except the birds taken under para- 
graph 1 of this regulation, so possessed may 
be killed by him at any time, in any manner, 
except that they MAY BE KILLED BY 
SHOOTING only during the open season for 
waterfowl in the State where taken, and the 
unplucked carcasses and the plucked car- 
casses, with heads and feet attached thereto, 
of the birds so killed may be sold and trans- 
ported by him in any manner and at any 
time to any person for actual consumption, or 
to the keeper of a hotel, restaurant, or board- 
ing house, retail dealer in meat or game, or 
a club, for sale or service to their patrons, 
who may possess such carcasses for actual 
consumption without a permit, but after mid- 
night of March 31, 1919, no migratory water- 
fowl killed by shooting shall be bought or 
sold unless each bird before attaining the age 
of four weeks shall have had removed from 



the web of one foot a portion thereof in the 
form of a "V" large enough to make a per- 
manent well-defined mark which shall be suf- 
ficient to identify them as birds raised in 
domestication under a permit. 
* # - * 

Regulation 9 — Permits to collect migratory 
birds for scientific purposes. 

Regulation 9 is amended so as to read as 
follows : 

A person may take in any manner and at 
any time migratory birds and their nests and 
eggs for scientific purposes when authorized 
by a permit issued by the Secretary, which 
permit shall be carried on his person when he 
is collecting specimens thereunder and shall 
be exhibited to any person requesting to see 
the same. 

Application for a permit must be addressed 
to the Secretary of Agriculture, Washington, 
D. C, and must contain the following infor- 
mation : Name and address of applicant and 
name of State, Territory, or District in which 
specimens are proposed to be taken and the 
purpose for which they are intended. Each 
application shall be accompanied by certificates 
from two well-known ornithologists that the 
applicant is a fit person to be entrusted with 
a permit. 

The permit will authorize the holder thereof 
to possess, buy, sell, and transport in any 
manner and at any time migratory birds, parts 
thereof, and their nests and eggs for scien- 
tific purposes. Public museums, zoological 
parks and societies, and public, scientific and 
■educational institutions may possess, buy, sell, 
and transport in any manner and at any time 
migratory birds and parts thereof, and their 
nests and eggs for scientific purposes without 
a permit, but no specimens shall be taken 
without a permit. The plumage and skins of 
migratory game birds legally taken may be 
possessed and transported by a person without 
a permit. 

A taxidermist when authorized by a permit 
issued by the Secretary may possess, buy, sell, 
and transport in any manner and at any time 
migratory birds and parts thereof legally 
taken. 

Permits shall be valid only during the calen- 
dar year of issue, shall not be transferable, 
and shall be revocable in the discretion of the 
Secretary. A person holding a permit shall 
report to the Secretary on or before January 
10 following its expiration the number of 
skins, nests, or eggs of each species collected, 
bought, sold, or transported. 

Every package in which migratory birds or 
their nests or eggs are transported shall have 
clearly and conspicuously marked on the out- 
side thereof the name and address of the 
sender, the number of the permit in every case 
when a permit is required, the name and 
address of the consignee, a statement that it 
contains specimens of birds, their nests, or 
eggs for scientific purposes, and, whenever 
such a package is transported or offered for 



THE GAME BREEDER 



79 



transportation from the Dominion of Canada 
into the United States or from the United 
States into the Dominion of Canada, an accur- 
ate statement of the contents. 
^ * ^ 

Regulation 11— Sale of migratory game 
birds lawfully held in cold storage July 31, 
1918. 

An additional regulation to be known as 
Regulation 11 shall read as follows: 

A person authorized by a permit issued by 
the Secretary may possess and may sell and 
transport until midnight of March 31, 1919, 
the carcasses of migratory game birds law- 
fully killed and by him lawfully held in cold 
storage on July 31, 1918, to any person for 
actual consumption, or to the keeper of a 
hotel, restaurant, or boarding house, retail 
dealer in meat or game, or a club, for sale 
or service to their patrons, who may possess 
such carcasses for actual consumption without 
a permit until midnight of April 5, 1919. 

H= * * 

Regulation 12 — State laws for the protection 
of migratory birds. 

An additional regulation to be known as 
Regulation 12 shall read as follows : 

Nothing in these regulations shall be con- 
strued to permit the taking, possession, sale, 



purchase, or transportation of migratory 
birds, their nests and eggs contrary to the 
laws and regulations of any State, Territory, 
or District made for the purpose of giving 
further protection to migratory birds, their 
nests, and eggs when such laws and regula- 
tions are not inconsistent with the convention 
between the United States and Great Britain 
for the protection of migratory birds con- 
cluded August 16, 1916, or the Migratory Bird 
Treaty Act and do not extend the open sea- 
sons for such birds beyond the dates pre- 
scribed by these regulations. 

Now, therefore, I, Woodrow Wilson, Presi- 
dent of the United States of America, do 
hereby approve and proclaim the foregoing 
amendatory and additional regulations. 

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my 
hand and caused the seal of the United States 
of America to be affixed. 

Done in the District of Columbia, this 25th 
day of October, in the year of our Lord one 
thousand nine hundred and eighteen, and of 
the Independence of the United States of 
America the one hundred and forty-third. 

Woodrow Wilson. 
By the President : 

Robert Lansing, 
Secretary of State. 



NOTES FROM THE GAME FARMS AND PRESERVES. 



Two Broods of Grouse. 

Editor Game Breeder : 

There are a few grouse living on my 
place which I have been humoring all 
summer just so they would get used to 
the place. They did and by the end of 
August I was able to count thirteen 
birds in two covies that have often come 
to drink inside the enclosure where my 
ducks are. For more than one reason I 
make the round of the whole place at any 
time of the day or night carrying a little 
.22 repeater. Often 1 sat down just to 
watch and see and this is what I saw : 
The two covies traveled together as a 
rule led — to my knowledge — by two old 
cocks. Sitting well camouflaged inside 
the enclosure, I have repeatedly seen the 
two cocks come in ahead of the rest and 
lighting on a birch or maple make, so 
to say, a survey of the field first, often- 
times sitting there for the better part of 
15 to 20 minutes before they finally 
dropped down to drink or for grit at 



which "sign" the covies would invariably 
follow within the next few seconds and 
fly right in without any apparent cau- 
tion. Rather peculiar for our grouse 
which are more terrestrial in their habits 
than the grouse of the Northwest and 
beyond which on the other hand seem to 
be more arboreal, at least so it seems to 
me, although I must say that I had 
neither the occasion nor the inclination 
in the past to pay much attention to the 
feathered game. Have you ever made 
an observation like this? I am sorry, 
very sorry, to say that between the short 
time of October 8th and to-day there 
is but one cock left of the two covies 
that stayed around, the birds having been 
either shot or scared away by the shoot- 
ing of the "liveyeres" — mostly ten gauge 
guns — some of them muzzle-loaders but 
all plenty and enough to scare all game 
within a radius of a couple of miles by 
their detonation alone. 

I am still waiting for the permit to 
trap black ducks — and shall by all the 



80 



THE GAME BREEDER 



probabilities get it after the ducks have 
hft the vicinity. 

Yours for more game, 

Connecticut Reader. 



Wild Ducks. 

Editor of The Game Breeder : 

My papa and I have been somewhat 
interested in wild game, so we started 
with seven wild Mallard ducks and three 
drakes and hatched about 150 little 
ducks. This year we saved twenty-three 
hens and seven drakes and did not raise 
a single duck. The ducks did not aver- 
age to lay two eggs a-piece. All the 
conditions were the same, so far as we 
knew of. They have plenty of grazing 
giound, as natural as could be found for 
a duck, and food such as grain and 
vegetables. 

Can you give me any advice as to the 
trouble ? 

Colorado. Milton Goodrich. 

(Without knowing about the water, food, 
etc., we are not able to say what the trouble 
was. We hope some of the many skilled game 
keepers who read The Game Breeder will 
write to us what they think about the matter. — 
Editor.) 

♦ — 

Unique Trap for Rabbits. 

A tile trap for rabbits, designed by De- 
partment of Agriculture experts, is well 
worth describing. This is the scheme : 

"Set a 12 by 6 inch 'T' sewer tile 
with the long end downward, and bury it 
so that the six-inch opening at the side 
is below the surface of the ground. 
Connect two lengths of six-inch sewer 
pipe horizontally with the side opening. 
Second-grade or even broken tile will do. 
Cover the joints with soil, so as to ex- 
clude light. Provide a tight, removable 
cover, such as an old harrow disk, for 
the top of the large tile. The projecting 
end of the small tile is then surrounded 
with rocks, brush or wood, so as to make 
the hole look inviting to rabbits and en- 
courage them to frequent the den. 

"Rabbits, of course, are free to go in 
or out 1 of these dens, which should be 
constructed in promising spots on the 
farm and in the orchard. A trained dog 
will locate inhabited dens. The outlet is 



closed with a disk of wood on a stake, 
or the dog guards the opening. The 
cover is lifted and the rabbits captured 
by hand. 

"These traps are especially suitable 
for open lands and prairies, where rab- 
bits cannot find natural hiding places. 
They are permanent and cost nothing 
for repairs from year to year. If it is 
desired to poison rabbits, the baits may 
be placed inside these traps, out of the 
way of domestic animals or birds. This 
trap also furnishes an excellent means 
of obtaining rabbits for the table, or 
even for market." 



Beaver Replaces Beef and Bacon. 

Algonquin Park, Canada., Nov. 2. — 
The Provincial Government is introduc- 
ing the beaver, Canada's national animal, 
to take the place of beef and bacon. 
Algonquin Park has shipped 600 ani- 
mals to the civic abattoir at Toronto. 
The flesh was sold to the trade at 18 
cents a pound. 

. «. 

A Suggestion for Wild Duck Farmers. 

By W. L. McAtee, United States 

Biological Survey. 
From all points of view it is desirable, 
in fact, practically necessary, for wild- 
duck farmers to keep their birds as 
nearly as possible like the feral game 
birds from which they were originally 
derived. If the birds are reared in part 
for sporting use, maintaining the stand- 
ard of wildness is a necessity. If they 
are being produced for market, retention 
of the conformation of the wild duck 
and especially of the natural gamey fla- 
vor is equally important. The wild-duck 
farmer's equipment and methods are too 
expensive to permit him to compete with 
producers of ordinary barnyard ducks, 
yet that is what he is forced to do if he 
permits his birds to become logy, corn- 
fed, prize-ring specimens. 

Space Is Needed. 
To keep ducks wild, either in nature 
or flesh, requires considerable space. 
There must be breeding and feeding 
ponds, both marsh and upland range, 
and, if possible, controlled areas over 



THE GAME BREEDER 



hi 



which most of the exercising flights of 
the birds will take place. The feasibility 
of keeping the ducks practically wild but 
at the same time of training them to re- 
turn to an accustomed feeding and roost- 
ing place, thus making them available 
when wanted for shooting, is discussed 
in general treatises on duck farming. 

What the writer particularly desires to 
discuss here are methods of conserving 
the natural, gatney flavor of farm-pro- 
duced birds. Sufficient exercise, under 
the system above noted, is an important 
factor in this effort. The most neces- 
sary step, however, is to limit the grain 
ration, a step desirable in itself for rea- 
sons both of conservation and economy. 
Wild ducks get a comparatively small 
proportion of food equivalent to grain. 
Fed an abundance of grain, the farmed 
birds inevitably gain flesh, become lazier 
and, in general, lose their distinctive wild 
-characteristics. Let the grain, therefore, 
be small in amount ; in the summer time, 
where other conditions are favorable, it 
may be entirely dispensed with. 

Roughage an Essential. 

The birds most need large supplies of; 
roughage, particularly of naturally suit- 
able kinds. This may be furnished by 
making available to them areas of marsh 
where they may work about gleaning tid- 
bits from both the animal and plant 
worlds. Bulrushes should form the bulk 
of such a marsh, the kinds producing 
large quantities of seeds being most de- 
sirable. Upland range should be pro- 
vided, and if this is already occupied by 
a mixture of grasses, clovers, and wild, 
weedy and shrubby vegetation, it will 
need no alterations. If made anew, sow- 
ing mixtures of pasture grasses and 
clovers is desirable, also the setting out 
of low, berry-producing shrubs such as 
bayberries, buffalo-berries, roses, and 
the like. 

Wild ducks derive a very important 
part of their subsistence from water 
plants, and it is necessary to have these 
in as great abundance as possible. Where 
there are comparatively large bodies of 
water six feet or less in depth, aquatic 
vegetation once well established will 
stand up under the feeding of rather 



large numbers of ducks. For the game 
farm not so fortunately equipped the 
following suggestion is made. Excavate 
a long narrow pond, or series of small 
oblong ponds, to a depth of three to four 
feet. If the valley of a little run is avail- 
able it may be more easily transformed 
into such a series of ponds and has the 
advantage of a constant water supply. 
Where running water is not available the 
ponds should be five to six feet deep to 
prevent the water becoming too warm 
for the best plant growth. The ponds 
should be very moderate in size, so that 
covering them with chicken-wire screens 
will be practicable. Thirty by 15 feet 
would be a practicable size to be covered 
by three 10 by 15 foot screens. In a 
long, canal-like pond vertical screens may 
be used to separate the pond into units, 
but walls probably would be more satis- 
factory in the long run. 

Food Plants Screened. 

With a number of such unit ponds 
available, the ducks can be turned into 
one or more at a time, and the others 
screened while growing a new crop of 
food plants. The best plants for this 
purpose are watercress (does best in 
shallow, cool, flowing water), water- 
weed, coontail and musk grasses. Shoots 
of waterweed and coontail, under favor- 
able conditions, grow six inches a day. 
It is not safe to try such plants where 
any other growth is desired, since they 
are such rank growers that they are apt 
to take complete possession. Water- 
weed, for instance, introduced into Great 
Britain soon became a pest, filling orna- 
mental waters, mill races and canals. 
However, the qualities which make these 
plants undesirable elsewhere are the very 
things which make them valuable for use 
on duck farms. Full descriptions of 
plants for duck farms and of methods of 
propagating them are given in Depart- 
ment of Agriculture Bulletins 205 and 
465, which may be obtained on applica- 
tion. 

To recapitulate : Wild-duck farmers, 
in order to provide sport or to have an 
exclusive market for their birds, must 
keep their stock true to the wild type. 
This can be done by giving the birds 



82 



THE GAME BREEDER 



sufficient exercise, cutting down the grain 
ration and making available to them a 
mixed diet of natural foods. It is hoped 
that game farmers will take these very 
necessary steps for the continuation of 
their 'business in a practical way. We 
must not allow game farming to perish 
during the present unfavorable times, for 
it is one of the fundamental necessities 
for the continuance in this country of an 
adequate supply of game. — Bulletin of 
The Protective Association. 



Country Homes. 

We strongly believe there will be little 
interference with game breeders who 
breed any kind of game in the future. 
We are constantly advising people not 
to hesitate about purchasing country 
homes with the view to having game. 
They certaintly cannot be arrested for 
liberating stock birds, and we are quite 
sure the laws soon will be amended so 
that it will not be criminal to harvest the 
food crop. 

Proposed Amendments. 

The needed amendments to State laws 
in some of the States are the following: 

1. To permit the taking of all species 
of birds and eggs for propagation pur- 
poses under State regulations. 

2. To make State laws conform with 
the regulations permitting the trapping 
of migratory birds for breeding pur- 
poses. 

3. To provide for the licensing of 
dealers in game who sell it as food. 

4. To permit the profitable breeding 
of all species in any manner on the farms 
and game ranches. 

It is absurd to require that money 
must be sent to Belgium and other for- 
eign countries for wood-duck. It is ab- 
surd to require that money only can be 
sent to Mexico for quail for breeding 
purposes. The farmers will stop the 
song-bird activity when they can produce 
game profitably for breeding purposes 
and for food. The "otherwise than by 
shooting" nonsense should of course be 
repealed in the few States where the 
State game officers are required to stop 



shooting. The game shooting clubs are 
the be§t customers of game farmers. In 
fact, there can be very little game farm- 
ing without customers. 

Wants a Farm. 

Minneapolis, Minn., Nov. 23.— The 
first application for a farm in the North- 
west has been received from Private 
Adolph Gold, Company D, 19th Rail- 
way Engineers, A. E. F. Private Gold, 
in his letter, says that in a Paris news- 
paper of recent date he saw an announce- 
ment of the effect that Minneapolis was 
making arrangements to supply returned 
soldiers with pieces of land. "I have 
learned to love the out-door life," writes 
Gold, "and when I come back I want a 
farm." The mayor referred the request 
to a committee of the Civic and Com- 
merce Association having the farm ques- 
tion under supervision. 

The State Game Departments. 

Many of the State game officers are 
subscribing members of The Game Con- 
servation Society and read The Game 
Breeder. All intelligent officers are 
aware that the farmers' interests must 
be distinctly considered and that they 
have the right to post their lands against 
shooting, as most of the farmers do. We 
feel safe in saying that all of the State 
officers who understand the more game 
and fewer game law movement now are 
in favor of it ; that they believe it will 
be far better for sportsmen of all classes 
to encourage those who wish to do so to 
breed game for sport and for profit than 
to have the ponds and marshes on the 
farms drained and the upland game 
placed on the song-bird list for terms of 
years or forever. 

The war disclosed the fact that 
America had become gameless in so far 
as there being any game in the markets 
for the people to eat, and that on vast 
areas, entire States in fact, it was illegal 
for anyone to take some species of game 
at any time. Those who understand the 
subject know that it will take very little 
of the land which is now posted against 
shooting to keep the markets full of 
cheap game. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



83 



The regulation of this food industry 
will make the State Game Departments 
of great economic importance to all of 
the people. They will represent the 
farmers and the people who eat the food, 
and the sportsmen who have been led to 
believe they will be damaged by game 
production soon will learn that an abund- 
ance of game on the places where it is 
produced will result in keeping the sea- 
son open for all hands and will result 
in the State Departments not being called 
on to execute laws protecting game as 
song birds. 

The demonstration on Long Island, 
New York, where many game clubs 
keep the shooting open for all hands, has 
done much to convert those who were 
opposed to game shooting clubs. When 
an attempt was made to put the Long 
Island quail on the song-bird list the 
clubs put an end to the nonsense, and 
anyone who wishes to shoot quail can do 
so, since very little of the land is used 
by the producers and a much larger area 
is restocked yearly by the overflow from 
club grounds. The dues in some of the 
'clubs are as low as $10 per year. 

The Game Breeder is a good friend of 
the State Departments which are endeav- 
oring to preserve field sports. 



The Farmer's Chief Enemy. 
By C. O. Le Compte. 

The record of the crow is like its 
coat — about as black as black can be. It 
may be that in the great plan of Nature, 
sometime in the past, the crow served a 
useful purpose — likewise the hawk and 
the buzzard. Take the buzzard for ex- 
ample. Once protected by human laws 
everywhere because useful for removing 
carrion, the stench of which offended the 
nostrils of all animal life, it is now out- 
lawed, because man realizes that it is 
better to burn or bury the dead — leaving 
no excuse for the existence of the 
disease-carrying buzzard. So, in the be- 
ginning, the mission of the crow, we 
may conjecture, was to preserve some 
equilibrium, some balance in the economy 
of nature. It may be he was placed here 
to hold in check the weed-seed and grain- 
eating birds, because weeds were a fac- 



tor in the past in covering the waste 
places of the earth and making them fer- 
tile. However that may have been, there 
seems to be no excuse for his existence 
now since man, the agriculturist, seeds 
the waste places to useful grains and 
grasses, and needs the help of the insect- 
ivorous birds. 

Probably no one has ever had a better 
opportunity than I have had to observe 
the crow and to study its life throughout 
every period of its existence. I was reared 
on a farm in a country where crows were 
plentiful and on account of my health I 
spent every hour of my life for years in 
the open. When I was nine years old 
my father bought me a gun, and one of 
his first admonitions was : "Never shoot 
a farmer's friend." Always the robin, 
the meadow lark and the other insectiv- 
orous birds were as safe near me as they 
could have been anywhere. 

But, believe me, the crow was never 
on our protected list, because we knew 
from observation and experience that the 
crow did a maximum of harm and a 
minimum of good. Years ago I wrote: 
"You see the crows hopping here and 
there over the pastures and flitting along 
the hedge-rows, and you may think they 
are only looking for grain or insects, but 
did you see behind them, as I so often 
have seen, the trail of desolated bird 
homes, you too would cherish in your 
heart an undying hatred for these winged 
devils of the fields and woods." 

About as omnivorous as anything 
could well be, they eat dead animals and 
are dreaded agents in the spreading of 
diseases such as hog cholera, foot and 
mouth disease and glanders. Insatiable 
egg eaters, they scour the fields, hedge- 
rows, thickets and orchards for nests of 
birds and even for the eggs of the barn- 
yard fowls. They displayed, I well re- 
member, almost human intelligence in 
watching our turkey hens in their nests, 
and then waiting on some nearby fence 
stake or dead tree top for the eggs. 
They follow the wild ducks to their nest- 
ing grounds in the far North to feast on 
the eggs and young. Prairie chickens 
suffer severely from their depredations 
and the pheasant preserves are the fre- 



84 



THE GAME BREEDER 



quent victims of their marauding habits. 
In the olden days, the corn-planting 
farmer said: 

"One for the black-bird 
Two for the crow. 
One for the cut-worm, 
Two for to grow." 
So, he would put five grains of corn in 
every hill. Most commonly, the crow 
is hated by the farmer because it pulls 
up the young corn to get the soft seed 
kernels at the root, and everywhere is to 
be seen the scarecrow in the newly- 
planted corn fields. Later on the dam- 
age they do to the corn crop can hardly 
be estimated, because they peck the end 
of the young ears, allowing the water to 
enter the shuck and rot the corn. 

They are destructive to the melons, 
pecking holes in them and causing them 
to rot on the vines. It is no uncommon 
sight to see small cotton cords encircling 
and across the melon fields of the South 
— 'Stretched to keep away the crows, be- 
cause the crows fear a trap where they 
see the white strings. They pull young 
rabbits from their nest, destroy young 
birds and chickens and even sometimes 
young pigs. They are very destructive 
to the pecan groves, and men are em- 
ployed on some of the big pecan planta- 
tions to keep the crows away. 

All in all, the crow is the farmer's 
principal enemy, and the plan of the Du 
Pont Company to hold a National Crow 
Shoot during 1919 will undoubtedly 
prove a big factor in the conservation of 
grain and the protection of game and 
insectivorous birds. It should have the 
hearty support and co-operation of every 
farmer in the country. — Du Pont Maga- 
zine. 



A Game Law Summary. 

The U. S. Department of Agriculture 
has issued its annual summary of Fed- 
eral, State and Provincial Game Laws. 
This bulletin of 69 pages contains brief 
outlines of many of the laws regulating 
the taking and transporting of game. It 
is known as Bulletin 1010 and can be 
secured by writing to the Division of 
Publications, U. S. Department of Agri- 
culture, Washington, D. C. 



BEAVER REQUIRE ATTENTION 
IN MINNESOTA. 

Increase Tempts Poachers — Will Be 
Removed Where Causing Damage. 

Beaver have multiplied and extended 
their operations so rapidly and exten- 
sively in Minnesota the past few years 
and their pelts are now so valuable that 
they have become a strong temptation to 
persons of easy game law morality. From 
practical extinction these proverbially 
industrious animals have increased to 
comparative abundance in many localities 
and their engineering proclivities have 
given rise to some complaints from farm- 
ers of flooded meadows and other 
annoyances, although investigation often 
discloses that complaint is apparently in- 
spired more by a desire to get the beaver 
than by any actual damage to property. 

In co-operation with the Federal in- 
spector, Mr. B. J. Shaver, of Ashland, 
Wis., the game and fish commissioner 
has been carrying on an investigation the 
past few months of ■ illegal traffic in 
beaver skins which has unearthed consid- 
erable evidence of beaver poaching and 
a number of pr secutions and convic- 
tions have resulted. It is comparatively 
easy to kill beaver without detection, but 
not so easy to dispose of the pelts with- 
out discovery, as some have found to 
their sorrow. The parcels post has been 
the favorite method of shipment, but this 
is in violation of the postal regulations 
as well as of Federal and State law. 

Legislation Suggested. 

The game commissioner is of the 
opinion that some legislative enactment 
should be made soon to provide a law- 
ful way to take and use a certain pro- 
portion of the beaver annually. This can 
now be safely done, provided it is care- 
fully safeguarded to prevent abuse. 
Employment of trappers by the State so 
as to control the time and place of trap- 
ping and the number of animals taken 
seems a reasonable solution. 

The beaver has become an important 
economic asset which should be used 
with care and under such restrictions 
and regulations as will guarantee per- 



THE GAME BREEDER 



85 



manence and prevent extermination. The 
wicked and wasteful destruction of 
beaver by the last generation, which all 
but exterminated the species in North 
America, should serve as a warning to 
us at present. 

A survey is now being made of all 
localities from which complaints have 
come of damage to meadows, timber, 
roads or railway grades, by the opera- 
tions of beaver, and where such actual 
damage is found the beaver will be 
caught out by the game commissioner's 
agents at the proper time and either re- 
moved alive to other localities or their 
pelts taken and sold and the revenues 
turned into the State treasury. — Fins, 
Feathers and Fur. 

Want Woods and Waters Public. 

Harrisburg, Pa., Nov. 2. — The United 
Sportsmen of Pennsylvania advocate the 
passage of laws that will make it illegal 
to lease lands to clubs or companies for 
the purpose of controlling such lands as 
private hunting and fishing grounds to 
the exclusion of the public. — The Sun, 
N. Y. 

If the United Sportsmen will amend 
their proposed law so as to make it ille- 
gal to rent lands for producing beef, 
mutton and certain species of vegetables 
We will boom the new law for all that it 
is worth and let our readers pass on its 
value. Why should a land owner get 
any rent for his land? The united band 
of licensed trespassers can get at the root 
of the matter by adding a clause repeal- 
ing all trespass laws. 



The United Sportsmen of Pennsyl- 
vania should get up a new law prohibit- 
ing the sale of lands for village sites 
or subdivisions for residence purposes. 
There might be a clause preventing the 
building of any structures on lands used 
by trespassers. Nothing interferes more 
with good shooting than the erection of 
houses somewhat close together. After 
a long fight in Illinois over a marsh 
owned by a club for duck shooting the 
land was sold, drained and subdivided. 
This of course is more outrageous than 



the mere renting the shooting on farms 
which are now posted. There should be 
some provision as to who is to pay the 
taxes on lands which cannot be rented. 
Possibly the States can appropriate 
money for this purpose. 



Committee Named to Handle Soldiers' 
Homes. 

In response to the request of Franklin 
K. Lane, Secretary of the Interior, for 
the co-operation of individuals and socie- 
ties interested in the study of unused 
lands of the country, with the purpose 
of providing homes for returned soldiers, 
the American Defense Society has an- 
nounced the formation of a Soldiers' 
Land Army Committee to study this 
problem. 

The committee is composed of Lyle 
E. Mahan, a New York lawyer, son of 
the late Admiral Mahan; Edwin O. 
Holter, who has had large land experi- 
ence, and George A. Hurd, president of 
the Mortgage Bond Company. 

As we understand the matter, the 
soldiers can have game if they wish to, 
and we are quite sure they will. We will 
see that all of them read The Game 
Breeder ajnd we shall urge them to go 
in strong for quail and grouse, pheasants, 
wild ducks and all sorts of game and 
sport, which will make the home life 
interesting. 



Goodness Gracious, What a Crime! 

WILD TURKEY BRINGS $152.50. 

Junction, Tex., June 15. — "Woodrow 
Wilson," a turkey presented to the Red 
Cross here by A. G. Farmer, was sold 
and netted $152.50. The turkey was 
hatched by a chicken hen from a wild 
turkey egg and raised by Mr. Farmer, 
and is now three years old and a fine 
gobbler. After being sold here he was 
returned to the Red Cross and a spe- 
cially constructed cage was prepared in 
which "Woodrow" will make a long jour- 
ney, his ultimate destination being the 
home of our President for whom the 
turkey was named. 

From here "Woodrow" went to Kerr- 
ville, where after being auctioned off for 



86 



THE GAME BREEDER 



the Red Cross Chapter it is expected to 
send him on to San Antonio for the same 
purpose and thence to other points along 
his route to Washington. It is hoped 
that this Wimble County turkey will as- 
sist in raising a large sum for the Red 
Cross at each station. . 

[ — How about the game laws. We know a 
Southern lady who was arrested and fined for 
having a wild turkey egg in her possession or 
hatching the bird, we forget just now what 
the crime was. Would it not be wise for the 
recipient Woodrow to look out?] 



Incubators 
Those who insist that it should be a 
crime to produce food on a farm and that 
no one should shoot more than he can 
personally eat and that the people under 
no circumstances ever should have a taste 
of the game they are said to own, seem 
to be actuated by selfish motives. When 
it appears that they gather enough money 
every year to provide game for thousands 
of people, if it could be properly ex- 
pended, we fail to see how they should 
be permitted to say that not even the 
owners of food birds can let the people 
have any of such property to eat provided 
sport paid all or a good part of the cost 
of production. The Congress knew what 
it was doing when it protected the food 
producers. 

The only excuse that sport has for its 
existence is that the animals and birds 
taken are excellent human food. Had it 
not been for the fact that sport furnished 
a big lot of cheap food it would have been 
ended long ago in countries where it 
flourishes for all hands — the owners of 
country places, farmers and wild fowlers 
or market gunners who all shoot and sell 
game for the people to eat in every civil- 
ized country excepting some parts of the 
United States and Canada. 



The Wood-tick. 

Next we come to insect pests. Expe- 
rienced ornithologists and entomologists 
are agreed that, as bird life decreases, in- 
sect life increases; and it has long been 
an established fact that the bird life of 
this continent has steadily decreased. 
Here we find again nature's true balance 



upset by man's intrusion. Senator Mc- 
Lean, of the United States Senate, one 
of the fathers of the splendid interna- 
tional law protecting migratory birds and 
prohibiting winter and spring shooting of 
wild fowl in the United States, recently 
stated that : "If the destruction caused 
by insects shows increase during the next 
twenty years as rapidly as it has in- 
creased since 1893, we might well reach 
a condition so desperate that the protec- 
tion of the nation against insects will be 
as necessary and justifiable as is now the 
protection of the people against conta- 
gious diseases an dhostile fleets." Of the 
various insects which attack animal and 
bird life, the wood-tick is the most con- 
spicuous in Manitoba. It is found most 
plentifully in scrub-oak, though it fre- 
quents all our wooded areas. Some sea- 
sons it appears in larger numbers than 
in others, but the past season (1916) was 
noteworthy in that a veritable plague of 
these insects infested the country. Per- 
haps this was because there were not 
sufficient insect-eating birds to keep them 
down to normal numbers. Early in May 
I killed several rabbits near Winnipeg, 
and these animals were literally alive 
with ticks, their eyes, ears and even their 
lips being clotted with them, and their 
entire bodies were covered by the loath- 
some, blood-sucking pests. After an 
hour's stroll through the oak and pop- 
lar scrub I picked 22 from my own 
body, and am convinced that no living 
thing passing through or near the woods 
at that season could possibly escape them. 
The rabbits referred to were thin and 
emaciated and it was quite apparent that 
they were slowly being sapped to death. 
We may well ask, how did the young 
grouse, which appeared shortly after- 
wards, fare? I believe the answer was 
given later in the year, when extremely 
few young birds were seen with the old 
ones. That the wood-ticks decimated 
the prairie chicken broods unmercifully 
I feel perfectly convinced, for I do not 
believe a young 'grouse has the strength 
to battle such a plague of vermin as ex- 
isted in the woods in the spring of 1916. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



87 



Herein, I believe, partly lies the explana- 
tion for the extreme mortality among 
partridge or ruffed grouse also, which 
were even scaicer than the prairie chick- 
en during the autumn just past. It might 
here be asked how long will the remain- 
ing supply of old birds withstand the in- 
roads of hunters, especially if the coming 
year should prove to be another adverse 
one? 

J. P. Turner 



Birds Wanted. 

Often we receive requests from people 
who wish to buy game birds and poultry 
that we either purchase the birds for the 
writers or inform them where to pur- 
chase, who are the best dealers, the most 
reliable, etc. 

It would be absolutely unfair for The 
Game Breeder to recommend one adver- 
tiser in preference to another. We in- 
sist that all who wish to advertise must 
deal fairly with our readers and we will 
"fire" an advertiser instantly who does 
not do so. This is generally understood 
and the result is we have only the best 
and most responsible dealers, big and 
small, and our readers who believe that 
game farming, game preserving and the 
sale of game for breeding purposes and 
for food should be encouraged should 
deal with those who support The Game 
Breeder by advertising in it. Every one 
who has anything to sell should carry at 
least a small advertisement which costs 
only a few cents and which helps much 
to make the magazine interesting and 
useful. Don't wait to be asked to adver- 
tise. We are too busy making it possible 
for you to do business with all species 
of birds to spend any time asking for 
bird advertisements. Those we have 
have come without our request. One 
reason why they keep coming is they pro- 
duce results. An advertisement costing 
a few cents will sell all the eggs and 
birds any one wishes to dispose of. 



The Effect of More Laws. 

One of our readers who opposedthe 
Migratory Bird Law sends the following : 

"If you wish to sleep well at night, avoid 
discussing in the evening the recent increase 
in the number of government employes. Theo- 
dore Price estimates, in Commerce and Fin- 
ance, that seven million Americans are now 
being paid out of public revenues. Continu- 
ing, Mr. Price says: "The services of men 
are required to make other men obey the 
law, and if we continue to multiply laws in- 
definitely we shall presently reach the condition 
that existed in Peru under the Incas, when 
twelve per cent, of the population were govern- 
ment officials unproductively employed in try- 
ing to enforce an infinitude of regulations, 
which, as described by Prescott in his 'Con- 
quest of Peru,' penetrated into the most private 
recesses of domestic life, allowing no man, 
however humble, to act for himself even in 
those matters in which none but himself or 
his family at most might be supposed to be 
interested. Even the number of children that 
a mother might bring in the world was deter- 
mined by government regulation." — E. W. 
Howe's Monthly of July, 1918. 

How many new specials should be ap- 
pointed to prevent quail breeding and 
the importation of quail from Mexico at 
a time when a man and his family may 
think they want quail for food producing 
purposes? The effort to prevent quail 
production on Long Island failed. So no 
specials will be required there. 



The citation of the advertisements of 
eggs in The Game Breeder at the Con- 
gressional hearing helped us in our efforts 
to have the game breeders fully protected 
against the wild-lifing protectionists. — - 
Dr. Job, of The Audubons. Thanks ! 



Now that all the young men are away 
we want easy matter to edit. Pictorial 
advertisements make our work light. 
Send them in without waiting to be asked. 



Why should anyone announce himself 
as the pronounced enemy of Common 
Sense? 



88 



THE GAME BREEDER 



T*?5 Game Breeder 



Published Monthly 



Edited by DWIGHT W. HUNTINGTON 



NEW YORK, DECEMBER, 1918. 

TERMS: 

10 Cents a Copy — $1.00 a year in Advance. 

Postage free to all subscribers in the United States. 
To All ForeignCountriesand Canada, $1.25. 

The Game Conservation Society, Inc. 
publishers, 150 nassau st., new york 

D. W. Huntington, President, 

F. R. Peixotto, Treasurer, 

J. C. Huntington, Secretary. 
E. Dayton, Advertising Manager. 
Telephone, Beekman 3685. 



IMPORTANT REGULATIONS. 

Our readers' attention is especially 
invited to paragraph 2 of regulation 8, 
permitting the shooting and sale of mi- 
gratory fowl and to the new regulation 
numbered 12, which would seem to indi- 
cate that permits issued by Uncle Sam 
are not valid in most of the States if 
State wardens wish to trap the bird 
trappers for the purpose of fining them 
under State laws. The new regulation 
12 has nothing to do with the important 
Section 12 of the law which only can be 
repealed by an act of Congress. We be- 
lieve the State laws will be amended to 
conform to the regulations. 

The shooting of wild ducks owned by 
game breeders and of new stock con- 
taining a "V" in the foot will remain a 
simple matter on country places and 
game ranches where wild fowl are plen- 
tiful. 

♦■ 

WHO OWNS THE GAME? 

The courts have decided with some 
uniformity that the State owns the 
game. Recently State-owned game and 
game owned by individuals, shooting 
clubs and game farmers have been dis- 
tinguished by statutory enactments and 
by court decisions. We have little doubt 
about what the courts will decide in cases 
where stock birds have been obtained 
legally and where food has been pro- 



duced by industry. Section 12 of the 
Migratory Bird Law points the way to 
sensible State laws and court decisions 
preventing interference with game 
breeders. 

Laws intended to protect the vanish- 
ing State game are not intended, of 
course, to save the abundant game owned 
by breeders. They should not and prob- 
ably do not prevent a valuable food- 
producing industry. To hold that laws 
protecting the rare State game apply to 
game produced for food and owned by 
the producers would be to hold that the 
legislature intended to make food pro- 
duction a crime. Logically the owners 
of tame, half tame and wild turkeys 
produced by industry should be jailed 
for having such game on the farms. 

New questions of ownership are pre- 
sented by the Migratory Bird Law and 
the regulation supposed to be made 
by the Secretary of Agriculture. If 
the migratory birds are now owned by the 
United States and Canada during the 
periods of their residence in the respec- 
tive countries, the United States and 
Canada can issue permits to take some 
of the wild fowl for breeding purposes, 
as has been done. If, however, the States 
still own the game, and the State laws, 
which uniformly forbid, we believe, the 
trapping of wild fowl, are not repealed, 
possibly those who trap wild fowl under 
permits issued by Uncle Sam may be 
arrested by State wardens. The States 
should recognize the United States per- 
mits, and all sensible State officers, no 
doubt, will. 

AN IMPORTANT V. 

Midnight of March 31, 1919, has been 
made an important date in the life of 
migratory water fowl by paragraph 2 of 
regulation 8 of the amendments and ad- 
ditions to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act 
Regulations. 

After the clock strikes 12 on the night 
of the date mentioned, "no migratory 
water fowl killed by shooting shall be 
bought or sold unless each bird before 
attaining the age of four weeks shall 
have had removed from the web- of one 
foot a portion thereof in the form of a 



THE GAME BREEDER 



89 



"V" large enough to make a permanent, 
well-defined mark, which shall be suffi- 
cient to identify them as birds raised 
in domestication under a permit." 

Possibly the "V" stands for Veni, 
Vidi, Vici some common sense ; but be 
sure and record the date of the birth 
of the ducks and do not let them get over 
four weeks old before the mutilation is 
effected. 

We would suggest that the other foot 
be branded voluntarily with the brand of 
the owner or the distinguishing ranch 
brand. If these brands be registered 
with The Game Breeder we will call for 
reports showing the migration of birds 
shot at and missed which may fall to 
more certain aim far from the rearing 
field and home pond. 

We have advised the Long Island 
Game Breeders' Association to adopt a 
circle "O" as its brand for the left foot 
of wild duck and will register this. We 
expect before long to have delighted 
sportsmen in North Carolina and else- 
where writing enthusiastic letters to The 
Game Breeder reporting the shooting of 
wild ducks with the "O" brand. 

P. S. — Dear Jasper White: Please 
look out for some long, slim, strong- 
flying Mallards, "O" brand, which soon 
will be coming your way, and report 
them promptly to The Game Breeder. 
Other brands will be reported as regis- 
tered. 

-+■'■+' ■ 

SHALL THE RUFFED GROUSE 
BECOME A SONG BIRD? 

In various parts of the country com- 
plaints are made that the game laws 
have not saved the ruffed grouse and 
that the shooting of these birds should 
be prohibited ; that, like the bobwjiite, 
he should be placed on the song bird list. 

We understand the Game Protective 
Association is favoring such legislation. 
It seems easy to secure laws prohibiting 
shooting for terms of years and to ex- 
tend the terms from time to time and 
later to prohibit shooting forever, as 
quail shooting has been in several West- 
ern states and in New York outside of 
Long Island, where we held on to it. It 
is not a difficult matter to keep the 



grouse and quail abundant in protected 
places, and in fact shooting can be made 
to produce such a result. It seems idle, 
however, to ask any one to give these 
birds any practical protection or to look 
after them properly during periods when 
it is illegal to shoot them or eat them or 
to get any reward for the necessary in- 
dustry. It seems peculiar for a protect- 
ive association which has a game breed- 
ing department to favor laws putting an 
end to the breeders' industry for a term 
of years, especially when it seems likely 
that such closed seasons must be ex- 
tended from time to time and may 
eventually be made perpetual. 

During the closed period the dogs 
trained for grouse shooting grow old and 
die. There is a better way for promot- 
ing field sports for all hands. A fair 
example may be found on Long Island, 
quite near the big city of New York, 
where the shooting clubs and game 
breeders keep the quail and grouse 
shooting open for everybody. 



OUTINGS AND INNINGS. 



Blame the Kaiser. 

Little piece of dry bread, 
Skin-thin slice of ham, 
Make a ten-cent sandwich 

That isn't worth a hurrah. 
-From the New Haven Register. 



No Worry There. 

Why worry about whether there will 
be sugar enough for the crop of cran- 
berries? There never was. — From the 
Los Angeles Times. 



A Thought for To-day. 

Bill Mink of Wellsville says it 
would be a fool jackrabbit that would 
run' in front of the retreating German 
Army, as it would surely be trampled 
to death. 



Thanks to Germany. 
A man goes into a restaurant for a 
meal now with the same feeling in his 
heart he used to have when accompany- 
ing his wife into a fur store. — -From the 
Portland Press. 



90 



THE GAME BREEDER 




FENCES 

FOR GAME PRESERVES 

The accompanying photograph shows one of our Non-Climbable 
" RIOT " fences, erected by us, with our indestructible steel fence post 
8 feet high, surrounding the Yale Bnwl Field, New Haven. Conn. 

This fence held in check 80,000 people who attended the Harvard- 
Yale Game, November 25th, 1916, and 60,000 people who attended the 
Princeton-Yale Game, November 13th, 1915. 

We have this fence and many other excellent designs. It will be 
to your advantage to secure our Catalogue, that shows many of the 
best erected fences in this country; also tells about our posts in 
detail ; how to erect a fence ; how to paint the fence wire to keep it 
from rusting. 

Become acquainted with our fence building system. It will save 
you many dollars and a great deal of worry. 

Fences for every purpose, with either straight or non-climbable post, 
tennis court back stops, etc., erected by our trained men anywhere. 



J. M. 

38 ROOSEVELT AVENUE 



DOWNS 

Suite A JERSEY CITY, N. J. 



RIV£R LAWN GAME FARM 

R. H. SIDWAY 

GRAND ISLAND, ERIE CO., N. Y. 

Young Pheasants for Fall delivery 
extra fine, healthy non-related birds. 

My birds are raised for my own shooting and are very strong 

on the wing. 

Member of The Game Guild. Member American Game Breeders Society. 






The State Game Departments, now 
that they have become of great eco- 
nomic importance, should have much 
larger appropriations than ever before. 
A big lot of food can be produced on the 
farms and quickly the bag limits can be 
increased on public lands and waters. 



Phone, 9286 Farragut FINE FURS 

JOHN MURGATROYD 

Taxidermist 

57 WEST 24th STREET 
Bet. Broadway and 6th Ave. NEW YORK 

Finest Work at Reasonable Prices 
Call and See for Yourself 



FREE EOUNDATION STOCK 

furnished to raise Rabbits, Cavies or 
Pigeons. Send dime for particulars and 
paper. 

Young's Tanning Compound, easily applied to any 
skin, large can $1.00, trial can 50c. Tattoo Ear 
Marker $1.50. Ear Tags 30c per dozen. Gibson's 
wonderful Rabbit Book $1.00. Cavy Book 50c. 
Squab Culture, a recognized authority on raising 
pigeons for profit, $1.00. 

NATIONAL FANCIER & BREEDER 

335 South East Avenue, Oak Park, III. 



The Breeders' and Fanciers' News 

SCRANTON, PA. 

devoted to the breeding and marketing of ducks 
geese, turkeys ' including the wild varieties), rab- 
bits, cavies. pigeons, etc Organ of the American 
Buttercup Club, and Waterfowl Club of America. 
Interesting and instructive articles by able writers. 

50c a Year. 3 Years for $1.00 
Canada 75c a Year, 3 Years $1.75 

Special Trial Offer in U. S , 8 Months for 25c 

AD. RATES: 75c an inch, or for 3 months or more 
at rate of 65c an inch. Classified, 2c a word. 

Address 
BREEDERS' AND FANCIERS* NEWS 

1558 Dickson Ave., Scranton, Pa. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letten: "Youn for More Game.' 



THE GAME BREEDER 91 



Pheasants, Wild Mallard Ducks & Wild Turkeys 

FOR SALE 

Hatched This Year 

Tamarack Farms, Dousman, Waukesha County, Wis. 



WILD DUCK FOODS 

Wild Celery, Sago Pond Weed. Widgeon Grass, Red-Head Grass, Chara and other foods which 
attract water fowl. We have the best duck foods which will attract and hold the game and which 
impart the finest flavor to the flesh. We plan and arrange the plantings suitable to all waters. 

GOOD SHOOTING 

DURING THE OPEN SEASON 

I am prepared to entertain a number of sportsmen who wish to shoot wild geese, Canvasback and 
other wild ducks and quail, snipe, etc. Only small parties can be properly looked after. Appoint- 
ments to try the shooting and learn about the wild duck foods are made by correspondency. 

J. B. WHITE WATERULY, CURRITUCK SOUND, NORTH CAROLINA 

Member of THE GAME GUILD 



Game Wanted 

^ We are in the market to buy game birds and deer 
raised on licensed game preserves. We can use 
quantities of venison, pheasants and mallard duck 
raised on licensed game farms and preserves which can 
be sold in New York State throughout the year but 
coming from points outside of New York State preserves 
must also have the New York State License in order to 
be permitted to ship in this State and be sold here. 

If you have game to sell, let us hear from you. 

House of A. SUZ 
414-420 West 14th Street -:- NEW YORK CITY 

Cable Address, SILZ, NEW YORK, Telephone, CHELSEA 4900 



In writing: to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters : "Yours for More Game." 



92 



THE GAME BREEDER 



mi 



mi. 



Wild Mallard Ducks 
and Ringneck Pheasants ■ 

WRITE FOR PRICES 



Scarboro Beach Game Farm 

R. E. BULLOCK, Manager 

SCARBORO, - MAINE 

Member of the Game Guild 

We Furnish Eggs in Season 



T^^^mwsiwm 






•>»•'■■*>, 



;" 




PROFITS IN FUR FARMING 

Learn about the wonderful Black Fox 
Industry which has proven so profitable 
to breeders. 

Read the Black Fox Magazine, the only 
paper of its kind in the world. 

SAMPLE COPY FREE. 
Subsc iption $1.50 per year. 

THE BLACK FOX MAGAZINE 

15 Whitehall Street, New York 




Established 1860 



Telephone 4569 Spring 



FRED SAUTER 

Leading Taxidermist of America 
42 Bleecker Street New York City 

Corner Lafayette Street Subway Station at the Door 

Specialist in All Branches of Taxidermy 

Write for Illustrated Catalogue 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



93 




WE HAVE 

For Sale 

Silver, Golden, Ring- 
neck, Lady Amherst, 
Formosan, White, 
Mongolian, Reeves, 
Swinhoe, Versicolor, Impeyan, Soem- 
mering, Manchurian Eared, Melano- 
tic, Black Throat Golden, Linneated 
and Prince of Wales Pheasants. 

Wild Turkeys, Japanese Silkies, 
Longtails, Mallard Ducks, S. C. Buff 
and Blue Orpingtons and R. I. Reds. 
Five varieties of Peafowl, Crane, 
Swan, Fancy Ducks, Doves, Deer, 
Jack Rabbits. 

Send $1.00 for new Colortppe Catalogue. Where 

purchase amounts to $10.00, price of 

catalogue refunded. 

CHILES & COMPANY 

MT. STERLING KENTUCKY 

Member of The Game Guild 
Member of The American Game Breeders Society 



Hawks, Eagles, and Wolverines. 

Fairbanks, Alaska, Aug. 24. — Petitions 
are being circulated here asking that a 
bounty be placed on hawks, wolverines 
and eagles, as a move for the preserva- 
tion of Alaska small game and fur bear- 
ing animals. When sufficient signatures 
have been secured the petition will be 
sent to Washington to be presented to 
Congress. 



An Indiana Infant. 

"Take that ink away from the baby." 
"Aw, let him write a novel if he wants 

to. Gotta begin some time." — From the 

Louisville Courier-Journal. 



Send in your advertisements without 
waiting to be asked. They are said to be 
the best part of the magazine and are so 
interesting that we hope to make the pub- 
lication more than half advertising. Pic- 
torial ads are easy to edit. 

Advertisements won the fight for 
"More Game and Fewer Game Laws." 



FOR SALE, WELL-BRED SETTERS 

Dogs Trained for Shooting. 
Young Dogs Suitable for Training. 

WRITE FOR PRICES * 

THE RIVER LAWN KENNELS 

Grand Island Erie Co., New York 

Member of The Game Guild 



DOGS 



HOUNDS— ALL KINDS. BIG50PAGE CATALOGUE 
10£. ROOKWOOD KENNELS, Lexington, Kentucky 

THE BLUE GRASS FARM KENNELS, of Berry, Ky., 
offer for sale setters and pointers, fox and cat hounds, 
wolf and deer hounds. Coon and opossum hounds, var- 
mint and rabbit hounds, bear and lion hounds, also Aire- 
dale terriers. All dogs shipped on trial, purchaser to 
judge the quality, satisfaction guaranteed or money re- 
funded. Sixty page, highly illustrated, instructive and 
interesting catalogue for ten cents in stamps or coin. 

AIREDALE TERRIERS. The genuine one-man dog. 
Pedigreed, registered pups. Males $25.00. Females, 
$15.00. Guaranteed Satisfactory. L. E. GALLUP, 2»oq 
Ogden, Omaha, Nebraska. 



House Cat Fur Comes High. 

St. Louis, Oct. 9. — A feature of the 
third internationad fur sale today was 
the fact that the prices fetched by house 
cat pelts showed an advance of 60 per 
cent. Ringtail cat also sold well. — The 
World. 

Game keepers might do well to skin 
their cats. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



94 



THE GAME BREEDER 




WILD TURKEYS 

Pure Bred Wild Turkeys 
Eggs in Season 

MARY WILKIE 

Beaver Dam, Virginia 

Member of the Game Guild 





PHEASANTS, PIGEONS AND 
EGGS. 
Pheasants, Amherst, Silver, Gold- 
en, Reeves, Mongolian, Swinhoe, 
Versicolor, Ringnecks, Cochin 
Bantams, White King Pigeons. 
Eggs in Season. 

BLUE RIBBON POULTRY AND PHEASANT FARM 

Davenport Neck, Phone 655, New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Member of the Game Guild. 



REGISTERED BLACK FOXES, 
TROUT & HARES. 
Rugged pups, bred on highest 
ranch in America. 1917 Breeding 
Record. 8 litters from 8 females. 
Also Mountain Brook Trout. Milch 
Goats. Belgium and FlemishHares. 

BORESTONE MOUNTAIN 
FOX RANCH 
Onawa - Maine 
Member of the Game Guild. 



MALLARDS AND BLACK DUCKS. 

Guaranteed Pure Bred Wild 
Ducks. Eggs in season. 15 Mal- 
lard eggs, $4.00, 100 eggs $25. 
15 Black Duck eggs, $6.00, 
100 eggs, $35. 

F. B. DUSETTE, 
Bad Axe, Michigan. 

Order Breeding Stock now to be 
grown for next season. There is 
a limit on Pure Wild stock. 

Member of the Game Guild. 
Do not write for prices or infor- 
mation. Send check. If birds do not please you 
return them and your money will be returned at once. 



LIVE GAME, ELK, DEER, WILD 
Turkeys, Quail, Pheasants, 
Ducks, and all other game. Eggs 
in season. See space advertise- 
ment. 

W. J. MACKENSEN.Yardley, Pa. 
Member of the Game Guild. 







«P 


III 


1 




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DARK MALLARD 

Black Duck, Mallard Hybrids 

These ducks are reared on free range 
especially for shooting and for decoys. 
They are strong on the wing. Big 
egg producers under control 
Price $3.60 per pair ; $1 .75 each 

ALBERT F. HOLMES 
8 Bosworth St., Boston, Mass. 

Member of the Game Guild 



BREEDER OF FANCY PHEASANTS 

Eggs in season. Amhersts, Silver, 
Golden, Versicolor, Mongolian, 
Reeves, Ringnecks, Manchurian, 
Elliott, Swinhoe, Impeyan, Mela- 
notus, Soemmering. 

GRAY'S 
GOLDEN -^ POULTRY FARM 
Gifford Gray, Orange, New Jersey 

Member of the Game Guild. 



DR. FRANK KENT 

Importer Bob White Quail 

San Antonio, Texas. 

Book your orders now for early 

Fall and Spring delivery. 

Bank references. 

Member of the Game Guild. 



SEA CLIFF PHEASANTRY 
We have nearly all. of the rare pheas- 
ants and cranes, also white, Java and 
black shouldered Japanese Peafowl. 
Mandarin ducks. Eggs in Season for 
sale. Write for prices and particu- 
lars. 

BALDWIN PALMER 

Villa Serena, Sea Cliff, Long Island, N. Y. 

Member of the Game Guild. 6t 



PHEASANTS 
ENGLISH, RINGNECKS 

Pearl White Guineas and White 

Cochin Bantams 
Baby Pheasants and Eggs in Season 

THE HIRSCH POULTRYYARDS 
45th Place, Lyons, Illinois 



WILD DUCKS 

The practical rearing of wild ducks 
is fully described in the illustrated 
book, "Our Wild Fowl and Waders, " 
written by the Editor of the Game 
Breeder. Price $2.00 post paid. 

THE GAME CONSERVATION 

SOCIETY, Publishers 

150 Nassau St., New York 






In writing to advertiser! please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Gam*." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



95 





GAME BIRDS 

All American game birds are fully 

described in the illustrated book, 

"Our Feathered Game," written by 

the Editor of the Game Breeder 

Price $2.00 

For sale by 

THE GAME CONSERVATION 

SOCIETY 

150 Nassau St., New York 



GOLDEN, SILVER, AMHERST, 
REEVES and RINGNECK 
PHEASANTS. 
All pure bred, strong healthy birds. 
Must be seen to be appreciated. 
Prices reasonable. Eggsin season. 

THOS. F. CHESEBROUGH 
Northport, Long Island, N. Y. 



WATER FOWL. 

I can supply nearly all species 
of wild water fowl and eggs at 
attractive prices. Mallards, Pin- 
tails, Teal, Canvasbacks, Red 
Heads, Gadwalls, Widgeons, 
Spoonbills, Canada Geese, Snow 
Geese and other wild ducks and 
geese. Write, stating what you 
want. 

GEORGE J. KLEIN, Naturalist 
Ellinwood, Kansas 




Mallard-Pintail 



THE GAME BREEDER 

-for- 

(Etjnatmaa 



One Dollar 



Per Year 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 

Announcements inserted under this head in small type for 3 cents per word. 
If displayed in heavy type, 5 cents per word. No advertisement accepted for less 
than 30 cents. Postage stamps accepted in payment. 

THE GAME BREEDER 



150 Nassau Street 



New York City 



EGGS FOR HATCHING-PHEASANTS-ENGLISH 
Ringneck, $35.00 for 160 eggs. English Ringneck, $3.60 
per clutch. Golden, $55.00 for 160 eggs. Golden, $6.00 
per clutch. Cash with order. Satisfaction guaranteed. 
OCCONEECHEE FARM, Poultry and Game Depart- 
ment, Hillsboro, North Carolina. 8t 



RINGNECKED PHEASANTS FOR 
McNARY, Martinsville, Illinois. 



SALE — E. N. 
It 



FOR SALE— ENGLISH RINGNECK PHEASANTS, 

field raised, full-winged, from unrelated stock. JOHN 

BUTLER, Easton Game Harm, Danielson, Route 1, Conn. 

21 

RABBIT AND HARE SOCIETY OF CANADA. 

Breeders should write for constitution ana by-laws. 

JOHN E. PEART, Secretary, Hamilton, Ontario. 12t 

WILL SELL THREE PAIR GOLDEN PHEASANTS, 

full plumage. $5.00 each bird; four pair Silver Pheasants, 
$4 00 each; Lady Amhersts; $6 00 each, this year's hatch. 
Golden Pheasants this year's hatch, $4.00 each. Prices un- 
changeable and for either sex. Noatte tion given to price 
inquiries. G. L. DAVIS, Mt. Sinai, Long Island, N. Y. 21 



LIVE GAME 



WILD TURKEYS — For prices see display advertisement 
in this issue. W. J. MACKENSEN, Yardley, Bucks 
County. Pa. 

PHEASANTS FOR SALE-RINGNECKS, SILVER, 
Guldens, Mongolians, Formosan, Prince of Wales, Lady 
Amhersts, Reeves. Swinhoc, Melanotus. Versicolor Man- 
. h' nan Eared. KOBINSON BROS., Aldershot, Ontario, 
Canada. 3 t 

PURE BRED WILD WATERFOWL AT FOLLOW- 
ing prices: Mallards. $3.75 per pair. Pintails, $3 25 per 
pair. Green Wing Teal, $5.00 per pair. Blue Wii g Teal, 
$375 per pair. Also relheads, Gadwalls, Widgeons, 
Canvasbacks. Spoonbills, at reasonable prices, for propa. 
■ ating and scientific purposes. GEORGE J. KLEIN. 
E inwood, Kansas. 



FOR SALE — RINGNECK PHEASANTS. MALES 
$3.00, hens $4.00. LULU H. CURRY, Roseville, 111. It 

HOYT'S CALIFORNIA PHEASANTRY, PRICE LIST 
FRED D. HOYT, Hayward, California. 



GRAY STAR PHEASANTRY 

Breeder of all kinds of pheasants. Eggs in season. 
Pure brand, strong, healthy birds for sale. GIFFORD 
GRAY, 21 Ward St., Orange, N. J. 



FOR SALE — Pheasants and eggs. Everything in the 
pheasant family. Pamphlet with order free. BUCK- 
WOOD PHEASANTRIES, Dunfield, Warren Co., New 
Jersey. (iot) 

QUAIL, PARTRIDGES, WILD FOWL, DEER AND 
other animals. See display advertisement in this issue. 
WM. J. MACKENSEN, Proprietor Pennsylvania Pheas- 
antry and Game Park. 

CANADA WILD GEESE AND THEIR GOSLINGS— 
A limited number for sale now — the surest way to start 
breeding this species. We are the oldest and largest 
breeders of Canadas in this country. Black and White 
Swan-. Wild Duoks, etc., for sale. WHEALTON WATER 
FOWL FARMS, Chincr.teague Island. Va. 

FOR SALE — 60 PHEASANTS. GOLDEN, SILVER, 

Lady Amherst, Reeves and English. Mandarin Ducks 

and Black Cochin Bantams. GEORGE H. LINDEMAN, 

1522 J uneway Terrace, Chicago, Illinois. It 

WANTED— WHITE PEAFOWL, EITHER SEX. 
Pied Peafowl, Soemmerring, Cheer, Hnki and German 
Peacock Pheasants, Ruffed Grouse, and White Squirrels. 
Also Swinhoes; state price and number. R. A. CHILES 
& CO., Mt. Sterling, Ky. 

HAND RAISED MALLARD DUCK AND DRAKES 
$1.50 each. JOHN KIERSCHT, Logan, Iowa. 2t 



Pheasants Wanted 



WANTED. ELLIOTT, MIKADO, SATYR, TRAGOPAN 

and Linneated Pheasants. Mature birds only. 

Write A. J. MERLE, Alameda, Cal. qt 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Youri for More Gam*." 



96 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Notice to Purchasers. 

Purchasers can rely upon advertisers in The Game Breeder. The Game Conservation 
Society has a committee known as the Game Guild, which investigates complaints promptly 
and insists upon fair dealing under a penalty of dismissal from membership and the loss of the 
right to advertise in the magazine. There are very few complaints in a year, for the most 
part due to shipments of eggs. These have been uniformly adjusted to the satisfaction of the 
seller and purchaser. Any member making a complaint should state that in placing his order 
he mentioned the fact that it was due to an advertisement in The Game Breeder. All mem- 
bers of the Society are urged to buy from those who support the publication by advertising 
in it. 



FOR SALE — PURE MONGOLIAN PHEASANTS 
C. W. SIEGLER, Bangor, Wisconsin. 2 t 

FOR SALE— SEVERAL MATED PAIRS OF PURE 

bred black ducks, $5.00 oer pair. Domesticated as pets 

but from wild eggs. ARROWHEAD, Milton, Vt. . 2t 

THE BLACK SIBERIAN HARE IS OF ENORMOUS 
size. It grows faster, matures and breeds earlier than 
any other rabbit, but best of all is its delicious meat and 
beautiful fur. Write for information and prices. 
S1BERIAM FUR FARM, Hamilton, Canada. 6t 



GLENWOOD PHEASANTRIES, HADLYME, CONN. 

Ringneck phaesant eggs for sale. Price $25.00 per 100. 

R. K. McPHAIL. 4 t 



FOODS 



WILD DUCK FOODS 

Wild duck food plants, and seed. Wild Celery. Sago 
Pond Weed, Widgeon grass, Red head grass, Chara 
and other kinds. 

There are hundreds of thousands of acres of water 
marshes where these, the best of duck foods, will grow 
and hold the game. Write and learn how to do it. 
WHITE'S GAME PRESERVE, Waterlily, N. C. 
Currituck Sound. 



ACORNS 

An excellent food for deer, pheasants and wild ducks. 
I can supply acorns by the bushel or in large lots. 
Write for prices, including shipping charges. W. R. 
McLEAN, R. F. D., Eagle Springs, North Carolina. 



BOOKS 



FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE — " THE HANDY, 
Volume Encylopaedia Britannica," 11th Edition, 29 
beautiful volumes, full leather bound. Thin paper edition, 
stamped in gold. Good as new, must of the volumes have 
been opened only a few times. Will sell or exchange for 
pair of Swinhoe or Elliott Pheasants. Address NED 
PEACOCK, McArthur, Ohio. It 



GAMEKEEPERS 



GAMEKEEPER, HEAD, WISHES SITUATION. 
Thoroughly experienced, rearing pheasants and wild 
ducks. Also the trapping ot vermin, care and manage- 
ment of dogs, deer, decoys, boats, etc. Apply to W., care 
of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau Street, N. Y. City. It 

HEAD GAMEKEEPER'S SON SEEKS SITUATION 

as gamekeeper. 11 years experience and 11 years good 

references. Understands all duties. Age 25 years. Apply 

DAVID GORDON, Hadlyme, Conn. It 

WANTED — POSITION AS MANAGER ON GAME 
farm or shooting preserve. Lonjf experience raising 
game birds. Understand raising and training shooting 
dogs, and trapping vermin. A S. B., care of Game 
Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York, N. Y. 



WANTED. SITUATION AS GAMEKEEPER. Ex- 
perienced on game rearing and dog training. Married. 
Apply H. care of THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau 
St., New York. 

GAMEKEEPER DESIRES SITUATION, THOR- 

oughly understands all duties, etc. Best references 

from Europe and this country. M. J. F., caie of The 

Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York City. 4t 

WANTED SITUATION— A GAMEKEEPER FAMIL- 
iar with pheasant and poultry rearing. I have also had 
experience in general farming and can plan the planting 
for game. BRUCE LANE, care of Game Breeder, 150 
Nassau St., New York. 6t 

GAMEKEEPER WANTS A POSITION FOR THE 

coming season on a game farm, club or estate. English, 
age 26, single, no draft, experience in rearing all birds of 
game and poultry, care of dogs and fish, trapping of 
vermin. Good references from England and this country. 
WILFRED BUTLER, Easton Game Farm, Danielson, 
Conn. 2t 



MISCELLANEOUS 



EXCELLENT OPPORTUNITY FOR GAMEKEEPER. 

Wanted, a Gamekeeper skilled in Pheasant breeding to 
rear large numbers of pheasants on a game ranch. Salary 
and commission will be paid. For particulars write to 
GAME FARM, care of Game Breeder. 

RINGNECK PHEASANTS, S5.00 A PAIR. GOLDENS, 
$10.00 a pair. Guaranteed strong and in the pin« of con- 
dition for Spring breeding. Ot der now as I have a limited 
supply of birds. LILLIAN E. GALLUP, 2209 Ugden, 
Omaha, Nebraska. it 

BREEDING STOCK OF PHEASANTS FOR SALE 
— Ringnecks, Silver, Goldens, Mon olians, Formosan, 
Prince of Wales, Lady Amhersts, Reeves, Swinhoes, 
Melanotus, Japanese Versicolors, Manchurian Eared. 
ROBINSON BROS., Aldershot, Ont., Can. 

"THE RANCH BRED FOX," THE BEST BOOK 

published on Fox farming. Tells all about this wonderful 
industry. Price 25c. postpaid. THE BLACK FOX 
MAGAZINE, 15 Whitehall St., New York 

FOR SALE-TEN MALLARD CALL DUCKS OR 
will exchange for Ringneck Pheasants. J. W. TURNER, 
Grayslake, Illinois. it 



C. Send The Game Breeder 
to a friend for a Christmas 
Present. Give us the order, 
and we will send gour card 
with the magazine. 



The Game Breeder 

150 Nassau St., New York 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sigrn your letters: "Yours for More Game.' 





Quail, Bobwhites and Other Species 

NOW IS THE TIME TO BUY QUAIL FROM 

Mackensen Game Park 

I carry the largest stock in America of live 
game birds, ornamental birds and quadrupeds. 

Also Pheasant Eggs by the 1 00 & 1 000 

I am prepared to fill the largest orders for Pheasants 
and Eggs, and for years I have filled practically all of 
the large State orders for both Partridges and Pheasants. 

All Pheasant Eggs Are from My Own Pens 

Pheasants 

My Pheasant pens hold thousands of 
Pheasants and I am prepared to famish 
these birds in large numbers to State de- 
partments, individual breeders and preserves. 

Wild Duck 

Mallards, Black Duck, Teal, Wood Duck Pintails and other species 

can be supplied in large numbers at at- 
tractive prices. Also Mandarins and all 
other water fowl. 

Now is the Time to Buy Wild Turkey Eggs 

AND 

Wild Turkeys 

I am now the largest breeder and 
dealer in Wild Turkeys and can supply 
these birds in good numbers to State 
Departments and preserve owners 

I carry the largest stock in America of ornamental birds and animals. My ponds now. contain nearly iJOO best 
Royal Swans of England. I have fine lot of the beautiful pink FLAMINGOES and the very large European 
PELICANS. Also STORKS, CRANES, PEAFOWL, fancy GEESE and DUCKS. My pheasant pens contain ovei 
a thousand Ringneck and fancy PHEASANTS. All stock is kept under practically natural conditions. I have 60 acre* 
if land entirely devoted to my business. Can also promptly furnish BUFFALOES, DEER. LLAMAS. RABBITS, etc 

Orders booked during summer. 
I have for years filled practically all the large State Orders and have bettei 
facilities for handling large orders than any other firm. 

Write me before buying elsewhere — It will pay yon to do so. Your visit solicited. 
I am only fiO miles from New York and 30 miles from Philadelphia 

WM J. MACKENSEN 

Department V YARDLEY. BUCKS COUNTY, PA 

Member of The Game Guild 




HEF&ULES 

Smokeless Shotgun 

POWDERS 



INFALLIBLE 





Always in Sight 

WHEN you want shells loaded with either of the Hercules 
Smokeless Shotgun Powders, Infallible or "E. C", you 
should have no difficulty in getting them. Each of the 
14 standard makes of shells, loaded with smokeless powders, 
named in the list to the right, may be obtained containing either 
one or the other of these powders. 

When you find the shell so loaded you can easily identify it. 
The name Infallible or "E. C." is always in sight on the top 
wad. It is also on the box in which the shells are sold. 
These powders always run absolutely uniform in quality. The 
load of Infallible or "E. C." shot today will give the same high 
velocity, the same light recoil, the same even pattern, will burn 
just as clean as the load shot a year or two years ago. 
And this matter of uniformity in powder is important. You know 
the difference that a strange gun will make in shooting, a strange 
club in golf, a strange racket in tennis. A strange powder, or a 
powder that varies in quality, has the same effect. 
Shoot either Infallible or "E. C." in any one of the 14 shells 
named in the list on this page. 

HERCULES POWDER CO* 



HIGH GUNi 
IDEAL 
PREMIER 
TARGET 



Demindton 
K~ UMC 

ARROW 
N1TRO CLUB 

SELBY LOADS 
CHALLENGE 
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Winchester 

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HBIZCMLES 
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Wilmington 



Delaware 




d"V>o? 





THE- 



Q AH E BREEDER 



VOL. XIV 



JANUARY 1919 



i i\ 



P 




The- Object op this magazine is 
to Make North America the 5iggest 
Game Producing Country in the World 



CONTENTS 




Survey of the Field — Live Game Prizes — Our Policy — An 
Oregon Outrage — Pheasants for a Banquet — Modern Game 
Laws — Game Refuges in Ohio — A New Stunt — The Farmers' 
Interest — The Migratory Bird Law — A Boom Impending — 
A Big Quail Year— Trap Shooting and Game Shooting. 



An Experiment in Game Breeding 
A Plan for a Quail Farm or Ranch 
The Prairie Hen and the Marsh Hawk 



D. W. Huntington 

By the Editor 

Elmer Langerin 



The Sage Grouse - - Opinion of Dr. A. K. Fisher 

Notes from the Game Farms and Preserves 

By Our Readers 

Aviary Species — Quail Breeding in North Carolina — Valley 
Quail Successfully Reared- — Aviary Pheasants — A Donation — 
— One Day Old Game Birds — More Pheasants — Contract 
Rearing — Some Wild Geese — Questions — A Small Start and 
a Good Business— Millions of Eggs — Stock Birds. 

Editorials — Experiments with Game-Preventive Laws. 

Outings and Innings, Trade Notes, etc. 



Published Monthly. Entered as second-class matter, July q, 1915, at the Post Office, 
New York City, New York, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 






PUBLISHED BY 

THE GAME- CONSERVATION SOCIETY. Inc. 

NEW YORK CITY U.S.A fgj>*v,j-/s 



iiiillllllllllll!lll!lilll!!lllllllllllllllllllll|[|||lllllllllltlllMinilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllll!IIHIiniinHII(nnillii.i 




AS A CHANGE, TRY 

SPRATT'S 

WAR RODNIM No. 1 

A granulated dog food of great value containing a 
large percentage of meat. 




Spratt's Foods Are Worth Fighing For 



AS A STAPLE DIET, WE RECOMMEND 

SPRATT'S 

WAR RODNIM No. 2 

A granulated food which is daily becoming 
popular amongst dog owners. 



Write for Samples and Send 2c stamp for "Dog Culture" 



SPRATT'S PATENT LIMITED 

NEWARK, NEW JERSEY 

San Francisco St. Louis Cleveland Montreal 

Factory also in London, England 



THE GAME BREEDER 



97 



fniiiJi 



jjirn;. 



lll'll 



„ iiiimiuii | 






hi m 




, * m ■: fs 






Mark X before subject that interests yon 
and MaiE This Coupon to 

E.I. DU PONT DE NEMOURS & CO. 

Advertising Division 
Wilmington G. B. Delaware 





Trapshooting 




Trapshooting for Women 




Trapshooting League 




Du Pont Sporting Powders 


Farm Explosives 


Py-ra-lin Toilet Goods 




Challenge Collars 


Town and Country Paint 


Auto Enamel 


Rayntite Top Material 




Craftsman Fabrikoid 




Fairfield Rubber Cloth 




Commercial Acids 



Name . . . 
Address 

City 

State 



Visit the Du Pont Products Store 
1105 Boardwalk, Atlantic City,N. J. 



He Learned to Hit 'Em 
at the Gun Club 

Back home he was a trapshooter. At the 
gun club he learned how to hit moving objects, 
ninety times out of a hundred. 

Stopping a hand grenade in mid-air or drop- 
ping a charging Hun is "old stuff" for him. 

At the cantonments and aviation camps in 
the U. S. and France regulation 

TRAPSHOOTING 

at clay targets is a recognized part of the training. 
And with the enemy trenches a few yards distant the 
bayoneted trench shotgun is proving a most efficient 
weapon of defense or offense. 

Whether for prospective active service or home 
defense you can learn to " shoot and hit " at one of 
the thousand of gun clubs in this country. You will 
be welcomed at any club by good Americans who 
will loan you a gun and teach you how to handle it 
with skill. 

For address of nearest club and Trapshooting In- 
struction Book check trapshooting in the coupon, sign 
your name and mail it now to 

E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co. 

Established 1802 

Wilmington 



Delaware 



EmmBggmmnnm 



ifilB^T 



iiiu.iiii 






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98 THE GAME BREEDER 



OUR WILD FOWL AND WADERS 

THE NEW YORK TIMES 

"The subject is the development of a new crop —a flesh crop which has especial 
timeliness in view of the general exhaustion of our food supply. Mr. Huntington dis- 
cusses in the most practical manner the restoration of this crop of feathered game, 
and from the standpoint both of the sportsman and the market gunner, wild ducks, 
it seems, can be raised as easily and cheaply as domesticated ducks, and with 
equally excellent financial results. The way to do this is described with estimates 
of cost and citation of experience abroad, where the deficiency of food supply has 
led to the discovery and elaboration of many remedies to which we have not yet 
been forced Mr. Huntington's book is illustrated with photographs, interesting 
alike to naturalists and breeders." 

WILLIAM BREWSTER 

"'Our Wild Fowl and Waders'^is obviously an able, comprehensive and very 
interesting treatise on a subject which has hitherto received but little attention from 
writers, especially in America, and concerning which naturalists, as well as sports- 
men, will, I am sure, be glad to be thus credibly and pleasingly informed." 

THE LOCKPORT UNION-SUN 

" Mr. Huntington has given to the American people an admirable treatise on the 
practical methods of making these splendid and desirable birds profitably plentiful. 
Ponds, streams and waste lands which do not pay the meagre taxes upon them can 
be utilized and be made to yield both handsome profits and good sport. This 
American authority on wild game tells the farmers and land owners of this country 
how to do it." 

CHARLES HALLOCK 

" The wild fowl book is valuable, clearsighted and scholastic. It is a direct 
appeal to sportsmen of common sense and generous behavior, and they will readily 
absorb its comprehensive pages and act accordingly- and live thereby." 

DR. R. W. SHUFELDT 

" I have enjoyed the treat in my reading of this book from frontispiece to finish 
and I wager anybody else will enjoy it. . . . The author has placed every sports- 
man, every naturalist and a great many other citizens of other callings squarely under 
obligations to him. The book is a direct and logical argument setting forth the 
means for the preservation in the future of our wild fowl and waders. . . . The 
illustrations are judiciously selected, interesting and materially add to the value of 
the volume." 

A. A. HILL 

" This is not only a readable book, but it is important in an economic sense, and 
it will especially appeal to all who are interested in the conservation of wild life, and 
especially our game birds." 

AUTOMOBILE DEALER AND REPAIRER 

" If the advice of Dwight W. Huntington, pioneer and apostle of the movement 
in this country for a rational game protection and conservation, be acted upon, the 
time is coming speedily when game will be as cheap as beef or mutton. At present, 
after fifty years of legal protection, we have no game to amount to anything save in 
the more remote sections. . . . The book is not only instructive in an economic 
sense, showing how to make wild duck preserves safe and attractive, how to get 
stock and eggs and the food required, but is delightful reading for all. The author 
of ' Our Wild Fowl and Waders' is doing a great public service in his campaign 
for more game." 

Our Wild Fowl and Waders will be sent to any address in the United States 
or Canada with The Game Breeder for one year upon receipt of $2.00. 

THE GAME CONSERVATION SOCIETY 

150 NASSAU STREET, N. Y. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



99 




Right--froni--tne--Start Shooting 

No other sport compares with snooting in its prompt and 
unforgetful reward or a right start in it. 

The boy -who learns to shoot right immediately begins to 
see his possibilities, to realize his tremendous advantage. 

Recognition or the importance of ^.7'9'At-rrom-the-Start 
shooting is the foundation of Remington UMG service. 

Start your boy off right too — there is no premium to pay and much for him to gain. 

Our Service Department will introduce him to .rOg'At-from-the-Start shooting, pass 
him along to tbe National Rifle Association steered clear forever of the handicap of bad 
shooting habits and qualified to try for tbe official decoration for Junior JVlarksman. 

ibis is tbe only official decoration of its kind. It is authorized by the U. S. Government. 

As he learns the value of right methods, -we believe he likewise will learn to appreciate 
right equipment, and join tbe many thousands who prefer Remington UMC. 

Boys — ^Vrite at once for tne Four Free Remington RightArom- 
the-Start Booklets on Shooting, and mention this advertisement. 

THE REMINGTON ARMS UNION METALLIC CARTRIDGE COMPANY, INC. 

Largest }/lanufacturers of Firearms and Ammunition in the ^World 
WOOLWORTH BUILDING NEW YORK 



100 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Let your trap gun purchase be a PARKER. 
Be one of the thousands of satisfied PARKER 
Gun users. 




PARKER Guns are made by gun experts. The 
purchaser of a PARKER Gun receives in good sub- 
stantial gun value, the benefits of experience in gun 
manufacturing of over 50 years. 

Once you have used the PARKER, you will never 
be satisfied with anything but the BEST. U A D %r rn nD <-k «^ 

Eventually you will shoot the PARKER. Why not " A.tCf».l!^t\. OfvvJS. 

now? Master Gun Makers MERIDEN, CONN., U. S. A 

Send for catalogue and free booklet about 20 bore guns. New York Salesrooms, 25 Murray Street 



OUR FEATHERED GAME 

A manual on American Game 
Birds with shooting illustrations in 
color, and bird portraits of all 
American Game Birds. 

By D. W. HUNTINGTON 

Editor of The Game Breeder 

PRICE $2.00 



Our Big Game 

A manual on the big game of 
North America with pictures of all 
big game animals. 

By D. W. HUNTINGTON 

Editor of the Game Breeder 

PRICE $2.00 



THREE THOUSAND 

Chinese-Mongolian Ringneck Pheasants 

FALL DELIVERY 
Full Wing, Healthy, Hardy Birds 

Reeves, Lady Amherst, Golden, 
Silver, Pure Mongolian 

Japanese Silkies, Buff Cochin Bantams 

New Zealand Red Rabbits, Breeding Stock $3.50 Each, Young $2 

We are Breeders Exclusively, and nothing leaves our 
farm that is not right in every particular. 



MARMOT PHEASANTRY 

Member of The Game Guild 
MARMOT, OREGON 



Tn writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Gam*.' 



T he Game Breeder 



VOLUME XIV 



JANUARY, J919 
Co} 



SURVEY OF THE FIELD. 



NUMBER 4 



Live Game Prizes. 

Our Committee on Prizes has made 
the following awards : 

1st Prize, Gambel's Quail, to General 
George W. Wingate for his article "How 
to Preserve Quail." 

The author advised trapping quail to 
save them during severe winter weather, 
but pointed out that it was illegal to 
thus save the birds. The article, no 
doubt, helped some amendments made 
to the laws. All states should, of course, 
permit the trapping of game birds not 
only in order to protect them in winter 
but also for propagation purposes. 

2nd Prize, Live Bob-white Quail, to 
Miss Lillian E. Gallup for her excellent 
article, "Playing with Nature." The 
author says she was induced to under- 
take game breeding by reading the book- 
let of the Hercules Powder Company on 
Game Farming, and described her suc- 
cessful breeding of pheasants. 

3rd Prize, Scaled Quail, to Thos. W. 
Cheesbrough for his article, "My Ex- 
perience with Pheasants." 

A special prize was awarded by the 
editor to C. W. Siegler for his article on 
"Breeding Gambel's Quail," which gave 
an account of a disaster which spoiled a 
promising experiment in breeding Gam- 
bel's from birds, awarded to the author 
last year for an article in The Game 
Breeder. 

Another special prize was" awarded to 
Z. T. DeKalmar for his article, "A Be- 
ginner's Experience." 

The Committee highly commended ar- 
ticles by J. Freston, "More Game and 
Crows"; by C. M. Menzel, Pheasant 
Breeding for the Beginner; "Mallard 
Breeding in Michigan," by A. B. Du- 
sette; "Black Duck and How to Raise 



Them," by R. E. Bullock; "Game 
Farms," by Hon. Theo. Roualt ; "Impor- 
tations of Bob-whites" by Hon. J. Quincy 
Ward; "My Experience in Game Breed- 
ing," J. B. Foote; "The Weazel," M. J. 
Newhouse. 

Our Policy. 

New members of the Game Conserva- 
tion Society are enrolled every day in the 
year excepting Sunday. It is important 
for these new members to know just 
what the Society stands for and what 
they should work for in order to secure 
the necessary freedom for game breed- 
ers who produce game for profit or for 
sport. 

1 — Breeders should have the right to 
breed and sell any species of game 
under permits issued by the State 
Game Department, without charge. 

2 — They should have the right to 
breed game in captivity or in a wild 
state within the boundaries of the 
farm, game ranch or preserve. 

3 — They should have the right to take 
wild birds or eggs for breeding 
purposes under liberal regulations 
and permits issued by the State 
Game Departments. 

A — They should have the right to sell 
the food produced to licensed game 
dealers under simple regulations re- 
quiring that the game shipped and 
sold be identified as game produced 
and owned by the breeder. 

5 — They should have the right to sell 
live game and eggs at any time. 

6 — Aviary species should be entirely 
exempt from the game laws, since 
these species are not found in a 
wild state and are not shot and 



102 



THE GAME BREEDER 



used for food. They are high- 
priced birds, owned exclusively by 
breeders whose industry should not 
be restricted in any way by laws 
intended to protect wild game said 
to be owned by the State, because 
it has no other owner. 

In some States the above program has 
been very nearly carried out. In many 
States the breeding industry is limited to 
certain species of game which least need 
the breeders' attention. Breeders who 
produce game animals own them of 
course, on account of their industry and 
the restrictions which appear necessary 
in order to save the wild game should 
not be applied anywhere to prevent the 
production of game. Where restrictive 
laws are enacted they should always con- 
tain a section providing that the law does 
not apply to game breeders or (as in the 
new United States Statute) that nothing 
in the law shall be construed to prevent 
the breeding of game on game farms and 
preserves and the sale of the game in 
order to increase our food supply. When 
laws are enacted prohibiting the shoot- 
ing of any species of game for terms of 
years or forever they should contain al- 
ways a section providing that the law 
does not apply to game produced on 
game farms and preserves, oherwise 
such legislation will put an end to all in- 
dustry intended to keep the game plen- 
tiful ; will put those engaged in such in- 
dustry out of business and prevent new 
breeders from undertaking the industry 
of breeding the species named in the law. 
It has become evident that closed sea- 
sons must be renewed in order to be ef- 
fective and that they eventually result 
in putting an end to field sports. Breed- 
ers interested in having state laws 
amended and who wish to have the 
assistance and advice of the Game Con- 
servation Society are invited to write 
to the Secretary. It is advisable to en- 
close a copy of the proposed law which 
it is desired to have enacted, defeated 
or amended. We are not lobbyists but 
we know how to reach those who should 
be told the effect of laws which prevent 
a food producing industry and too often 
put an end to shooting. 



An Oregon Outrage. 

The Seattle Daily Times reports the 
following outrageous arrest of one of 
our readers : 

When R. B. Coman of Cowen Park, presi- 
dent of the Pheasant Breeders' Association, 
presented a dead go.den pheasant to County 
Game Warden Frank L. Wilkins for tagging 
this morning, he was surprised at being im- 
mediately placed under arrest and charged 
with having the dead bird in his possession 
out of season. 

Coman explained that he had raised the 
pheasant and that it had such unusually beau- 
tiful plumage that he killed it to mount for 
his private collection. 

Game Warden Wilkins explained that the 
law made his act a misdemeanor and took 
Coman before Justice of the Peace Otis W. 
Brinker, who fined him $5. 

The warden who made the arrest 
should promptly be fired, as he would be 
if the State Game Officer should take 
the action warranted by the occurrence. 
The State should pay damages to Mr. 
Coman for the loss of his fowl. 

Game laws intended to protect the 
vanishing wild game birds which are 
edible do not apply to aviary pheasants 
which are not shot or eaten. The game 
laws do not apply to canaries, peacocks 
and many other birds and readers who 
are raided by ignorant wardens should 
have their cases continued and write to 
The Game Breeder, which will promptly 
look into the matter and suggest a proper 
defense. Good State game officers do 
not relish being disgraced by outrageous 
arrests. 

Pheasants for a Banquet. 

One of our readers writes that he has 
sold 600 pheasants for a banquet. The 
tendency of such sales is, of course, to 
make the game abundant. 

Modern Game Laws. 

A direct result of the "More Game 
and Fewer Game Laws" movement ap- 
pears in amendments to state laws per- 
mitting the production, shooting, sale 
and transportation of all or certain spe- 
cies of game. Thirty-seven states now en- 
courage game breeding and the states 
where it still is criminal to produce game 



THE GAME BREEDER 



103 



profitably will amend their laws this win- 
ter without doubt. 

Game Refuges in Ohio. 

Our readers will remember that when 
it was proposed to create quiet refuges 
for quail and other game birds in Ohio 
we suggested they hardly were necessary 
for two reasons : first, because the entire 
State of Ohio was a refuge, no shooting 
being permitted in so far as the chief 
game bird, the quail, was concerned, and 
it seemed evident if there was anything 
in the usually accepted idea that "the 
greater includes the less" it was hardly 
necessary to set aside small areas where 
quail shooting should be prohibited in 
Ohio. We also suggested that since prac- 
tically all of the farms were posted 
against shooting it would not help mat- 
ters much to designate some of them as 
quiet refuges. We have, of course, a 
little prejudice in favor of sport because 
the sportsmen are the best customers of 
our game breeding advertisers and to be 
perfectly frank we like to shoot a few 
quail ourselves as we do on Long Island, 
N. Y., where it is not a crime to have 
quail or shoot them. 

We are pleased to observe that our 
advice about game in Ohio has been 
heeded and that the idea of quiet refuges 
has been abandoned. 

A New Stunt. 

We are now informed that a new 
refuge plan has been proposed which 
promises to be more noisy and on this 
account more interesting to shooters. 
Briefly outlined from a newspaper clip- 
ping sent to The Game Breeder, the new 
plan contemplates the leasing of from 
3,000 to 5,000 acres of properly located 
lands in each county through various 
sportsmen's organizations and the estab- 
lishing of preserves or sanctuaries 
"where especially ring-necked pheasants 
can be raised and when produced in suf- 
ficient" abundance permitted to spread 
around the surrounding territory." 

Why the game birds should be "espe- 
cially ring-necked" is not made plain in 
the clipping. The quail is Ohio's best 
game bird. 



The Farmers Interest. 

The farmers, we are told, will be asked 
to set aside these tracts for the purpose, 
the land being cultivated wherever pos- 
sible as at present and a patrol officer 
to be established on the land to see that 
there is no illegal shooting or other un- 
lawful acts. The Governor of the state 
is said to be enthusiastic about the per- 
formance. 

We shall observe the new refuge plan 
in Ohio with interest. As we understand 
the matter the shooting license is to re- 
main at $1.00. We are not told just 
what the bag limit is to be, but placing 
it at six birds per season, this would 
indicate that a "patrol officer" is ex- 
pected to produce six ring-necks for a 
dollar. Possibly our bag limit has been 
placed too high, but if the patrol officer 
produces one pheasant for each gun he 
will furnish much cheaper pheasants 
than are produced on any state or com- 
mercial game farms. Ohio is a big state 
and there are hundreds of commercial 
breeders within its boundaries. As we 
have said often, we are in favor of 
everything, public shooting on public 
areas, private shooting on farms where 
the farmers permit it, game farms, game 
ranches, game clubs, game preserves, 
everything and anything which will re- 
sult in more game and fewer game laws. 

The Migratory Bird Law. 

The following from the Seattle Daily 
Times was sent by a reader : 

The United States Bureau of Entomology 
has notified State Game Warden L. H. Dar- 
win that he will be required, under the fed- 
eral migratory bird law, to obtain a permit to 
keep the migratory birds at the state game 
farm in captivity. Darwin has referred this 
letter to Attorney-General W. V. Tanner with 
the suggestion that if the attorney-general de- 
sires to test the validity of the federal act Dar- 
win will afford him the opportunity by refus- 
ing to comply with the order. 

Order Far-Reaching. 

If the state acquiesces in the bureau's order 
and asks for a permit to hold wild fowl for 
the purpose of propagating game at the state 
farm, it follows that King and other counties 
which maintain game farms will be required 
to ask for permission to coop up the pheasants 
and ducks used as brood stock. 

In turn the order will fall on sportsmen 



104 



THE GAME BREEDER 



who use live decoys at their duck preserves. 
These live decoys, as a rule, have become so 
nearly domesticated that they would not leave 
their pens if there were no protecting screens 
on top, but gun clubs would not care to as- 
sume the risk of their flying away. 
Conflict in Court Avoided. 

The attorney-general told the game warden 
a few months ago that the migratory bird law 
could not be upheld in court and suggested 
that Darwin refuse to enforce it in this state. 
When Darwin got ready to serve this ul- 
timatum he was informed that the federal act 
so nearly met the Washington game laws that 
federal authorities would be satisfied with the 
enforcement of the state code. In this manner 
a test of the validity of the act was avoided, 
but Darwin believes the question can be 
brought up through the new order. 

Since the Bureau of Biological Sur- 
vey (not Entomology as the Times has 
it) has decided to issue permits to take 
ducks and eggs for breeding and shoot- 
ing purposes and the law distinctly pro- 
tects sportsmen and breeders who wish 
to produce wild fowl, we are glad to ob- 
serve that the differences in Washington 
State and Washington City have been 
amicably adjusted. 

Good Advice. 

If you want any game birds or eggs 
for breeding purposes write to our ad- 
vertisers and place your orders now. 
Otherwise you probably will not get any 
birds or eggs— certainly not any early 
eggs, which are the most desirable. 

A Boom Impending. 

It is evident that commercial game 
farming and syndicate and individual 
game shooting are to have a boom this 
season. Some of the breeders write that 
they will enlarge their plants and will be 
in the market to purchase birds and eggs 
and will have none to sell during the 
breeding season. It will pay the numer- 
ous shooting clubs to produce game on 
a much larger scale than ever before be- 
cause the market prices for dead game 
remain up and it is an easy matter to 
sell a big lot of game, as many of the 
clubs now do in order to help pay their 
running expenses. 

A Big Quail Year. 

There is every indication that quail 
breeding will have a boom this year. 



Many new quail clubs are being started 
in places where it is not criminal to 
profitably look after the quail. It seems 
a pity that in some places quail have 
been placed on the song bird list, but 
there are vast areas where quail can be 
properly looked after and where good 
quail shooting can be had as a result of 
the necessary and proper industry. 

The Massachusetts Commission con- 
ducts a successful game breeding plant 
where sportsmen can learn how to pro- 
duce quail by hand-rearing methods 
which will be found useful as supple- 
mentary to the protection of quail bred 
wild in protected fields. 

Trap Shooting and Game Shooting. 

We were asked upon one occasion why 
we did not give more space to trap 
shooting, "the sport alluring." Our an- 
swer was that we believed the field was 
fully covered by periodicals better 
equipped to handle the subject than we 
are. 

We are in favor of trap shooting, but 
we also are in favor of shooting game. 
We do not fancy, for example, the idea 
that only trap shooting should be per- 
mitted in Ohio and many other states 
which are quite suitable for quail shoot- 
ing, as we know from experience in the 
state named and in many other states 
which formerly permitted quail shoot- 
ing. We like pheasant shooting, but we 
do not believe that pheasant should be 
substituted for quail and for grouse and 
other indigenous game which should not 
be "protected off the face of the earth." 

We have interviewed many sportsmen 
recently in order to ascertain if they 
were opposed to game shooting clubs 
where game is shot abundantly and we 
have not found a single sportsman who 
would say that game shooting should be 
prohibited on the places where sports- 
men are producing game. 



From the Chestnut Tree. 

"A man may be a big stiff " 

"Yes, yes; proceed!" 
"But a painful corn' will make him 
limp." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



105 



AN EXPERIMENT IN GAME BREEDING. 

By D. W. Huntington. 



Quail Breeding. 

Our quail breeding experiments were 
confined to two species — the bob-whites 
and the Gambel's partridge or quail. 
Since much time was consumed in se- 
lecting and renting the ground for our 
experiments we were necessarily late in 
ordering quail, and when our bob-whites 
arrived they were all cock birds but one. 
It is fair to the dealer to say that he in- 
formed us this was the best he could do 
and we accepted the birds gladly, since 
a good number of extra cock birds is 
always useful the first season on an ex- 
perimental farm where the experiments 
are intended to show some shooting. 
The hen quail, a Massachusetts bird, was 
paired with a cock, and the birds were 
placed in a small pen containing grass 
and clover and some brush loosely piled 
at one end of the pen. The hen nested 
and laid fourteen eggs when unfortun- 
ately she died from a cause unknown. 
The cock bird at once occupied the nest 
and successfully hatched all the eggs but 
one and reared the brood to maturity. He 
was much admired ' by visitors who 
caught a glimpse of him sitting closely 
in the grass under the brush. 



Breeding Gambel's Quail. 

Our most important experiment was 
made with Gambel's quail. Three dozen 
birds were purchased in New Mexico 
and these were shipped safely and with- 
out any loss. Since there was some de- 
lay in issuing the license to breed game 
and it had not arrived when the birds 
were shipped they were ordered sent to 
a member of the Society on Long Island 
who had a license and a day or two later 
the birds were re-shipped to the farm. 

A few of the birds were given to the 
owner of the game farm who kept them 
temporarily and the rest arrived without 
any loss and in splendid condition, indi- 
cating that the birds can be shipped safely 
long distances. 

Considering the late start, the number 



of eggs gathered from a dozen hen quail 
was very satisfactory. One pair mated 
arbitrarily produced more eggs than the 
average hen did in a larger pen where 
the rest of the birds were confined to- 
gether. It is evident, however, that 
Gambel's quail will lay numerous eggs, 
just as pheasants do, when a number of 
birds are confined in one pen. The pens 
contained grass and brush, the last named 
placed in the center and at one end of 
the pen for concealment — the end oppo- 
site the door used by the keeper when 
he entered to gather the eggs. One hun- 
dred and thirty eggs were gathered. A 
few were used to make the color illus- 
tration for the October number of The 
Game Breeder. One hundred and twenty 
eggs were placed in an incubator with 
30 bob-white quail eggs which came from 
Massachusetts, the last named, it is fair 
to say, were held for some time after 
their journey in the mail because it was 
impossible to get hens promptly to incu- 
bate them. Ninety out of one hundred 
and twenty Gambel's quail eggs and two 
of the bob-white eggs out of thirty 
hatched in the incubator. 

The young quail were transferred to 
bantams and placed in coops. These 
coops were placed in the corners of three 
adjoining pens, each 30 feet long by 10 
feet wide. The pens were erected on one 
side of the kitchen garden which was 
full of weeds which made excellent cover 
for the young quail and provided both 
insect and green weed-seed foods. 

One hen killed twelve young quail the 
first night, but with this exception the 
losses were small, very small, I would 
say, for the first year in experimental 
work "with a species never before hand- 
reared, so far as I am aware. 

The sides and ends of the pens were 
forty-six inches high. Two boards each 
eleven inches wide were used for the 
base and the upper parts of the sides 
and ends of the pens were made of 
24-inch wire, half-inch mesh. The pens 
were not enclosed at the top, but there 



106 



THE GAME BREEDER 



were no losses due to vermin, the place 
being trapped and the pens located 
within easy range of the kitchen door. 
Some cats and skunks, one of the first 
named being a very large and evidently 
a wild one, were trapped, and some 
crows and hawks fell to the gamekeep- 
er's gun, but the hawks were not numer- 
ous and they only succeeded in taking 
one barn yard fowl from the chicken 
yard in a little more exposed situation. 
The young birds grew rapidly and soon 
were observed running about in the 
weeds. They were shut up in the coops 
at night as young pheasants are. The 
young birds came readily to feed at the 
cluck of the hen and often were ob- 
served running in and out of the coops. 
They no doubt secured much insect food 
and they were observed eating the green 
seeds of the weeds in the garden. When 
about the size of sparrows the young 
quail began flying out of the pens into 
the garden, which contained beans, corn, 
tomatoes, asparagus and other vegeta- 
bles, now much overgrown with weeds, 
and it was interesting to hear the young 
birds chirping in the weeds and to ob- 
serve them flying over the sides of their 
enclosures into the garden and back 
again into the pens. The keeper lifted 
the wire slightly from the boards so that 
the young quail could fly up on the edges 
of the boards and pass out and in easily. 
As they grew older they spent much of 
their time outside of the pens and the 
exercise in procuring insects and seeds 
no doubt was beneficial. 

A cock bob-white placed in a coop in 
one corner of a pen, his pen facing the 
coop of a bantam to which a brood of 
young quail had been given, attracted 
the young quail to his coop and when he 
was liberated he was observed flying 
in and out of the pen and associating 
with the young quail. I have no doubt 
that young quail can be transferred in 
this manner from a bantam to a cock 
or hen quail and it would seem that 
young Gambel's, scaled and California 
valley quail, which are runners and do 
not lie well to the dog, can in this man- 
ner be taught good sporting manners. 
An even better plan, of course, would be 



to hatch the eggs of running quail under 
bob-white hens and to liberate the hen 
and young brood in a garden well pro- 
tected with briars and weeds. This ex- 
periment will be tried next season when 
we expect to rear a very large number 
of quail of several species in various 
ways. 

As our quail grew they became 
strong on the wing and on several occa- 
sions when showing the young birds to 
visitors a number of the birds, now larger 
than sparrows, whirred out of the pens, 
some flying across the road in front of 
the house and others to considerable dis- 
tances in other directions. How many, 
if any, were lost or failed to return it 
would be impossible to say, since the 
birds never could be counted accurately 
as they ran about in the weeds in and 
outside of the pens and as they flew from 
one pen into the other. 

Since many quail were found and 
pointed by dogs in the fall it would seem 
that the losses were very small. About 
45 or 50 of the 122 quail hatched and 
penned undoubtedly escaped and have 
survived up to date, excepting a few 
which were shot. Fifteen were caught 
when they were about full grown and 
these are thriving in a pen with a wired 
top to prevent their escape. Up to date 
there have been no losses in this pen and 
in this connection I may say that the 
stock of original birds thrived amazingly 
in the pens where the eggs were laid, 
the food being chick grain in addition 
to lettuce and grass and clover plucked 
outside of the pens and thrown in for 
the birds, as the grass in the pens was 
eaten or trodden down by the running 
birds. 

A few days ago a cow lifted the catch 
on the door of the pen and the door blew 
open, liberating these Gambel's quail. 
Although the accident is to be regretted, 
it will be interesting to observe if the 
quail thrive during the winter in a wild 
state and if they nest wild next season. 
A large flock of Gambel's quail recently 
was pointed by a dog and flushed in a 
field on the farm and these no doubt 
were the birds which escaped. Some of 
them may be trapped and held for hand- 



THE GAME BREEDER 



107 



rearing experiments. A small flock of 
Gambel's recently was observed crossing 
the road about two miles east of the 
farm by a member of the Long Island 
Game Breeders' Association, and these, 
it seems likely, were birds which went to 
the road to dust and were alarmed by 
an automobile or other vehicle and were 
started in a wrong direction. The loss 
is not a bad feature of the experiment 
since if birds which go out survive and 
establish themselves some free shooting 
will be provided in places where there 
was none and this we regard as a public 
service and a popular incident to game 
preserving. 

Several important facts have been 
proved by the experiment with Gambel's 
quail : 

1. The birds can be shipped long dis- 
tances without fear of loss due to dis- 
ease or to the long journeny. They can 
and should be shipped as freely as poul- 
try and pigeons are. 

2. The quail eggs can be hatched suc- 
cessfully in incubators. 

3. Good numbers of birds can be 
reared on small areas for commercial 
purposes or to supplement the restocking 
of shooting grounds where birds also are 
liberated and permitted to nest in safe 
and attractive fields. The birds lay nu- 
merous eggs when penned, many more 
than they would lay in a wild state. The 
eggs should be a great source of profit 
on a game farm since they will sell for 
more than pheasant eggs and the quail 
are, comparatively, very small eaters and 
thrive in much smaller enclosures than 
those used for pheasants. 

Birds shot over a point at different 
times indicate that the Gambel's quail 
lie well to a dog, at least in places where 
the weeds and other covers are heavy, 
as they are on the Long Island farm. 
Mr. H. H. Shannon, who made numer- 
ous observations of the birds in order 
to study their field behavior, is, no doubt, 
right in the opinion he expressed re- 
cently that the birds lie well, probably 
on account of the cover and the lack of 
opportunity to run which they have on 
sandy desert areas. 

Very few birds were harvested "by 



shooting" (none otherwise), but enough 
were taken to establish the fact that the 
birds are very suitable and desirable as 
food. They also have a thick plumage, 
somewhat heavier than that of the bob- 
whites, and this would indicate that they 
should stand our climate nicely. Obser- 
vations on this point to be made of birds 
in a wild state and in the pens, includ- 
ing the fifteen birds reared on the place 
and penned, and observations to be 
made of many birds purchased at dis- 
tant points will complete the record of 
the experiment with Gambel's quail. It 
is interesting to record that with a late 
start and some bad cold rainy weather 
which was encountered, birds can be 
procured at a distance, reared on the 
ground and shot over dogs the first sea- 
son. No possible number of new game 
laws ever can be expected to produce 
such results on ground where there is no 
game. 

The field where the birds are expected 
to winter in a wild state is planted in 
alternating strips of field corn and buck- 
wheat; the last named was left standing. 
Examination of the birds shot proves 
that they have the same liking for buck- 
wheat which the bob-whites have. The 
corn was not closely cultivated and 
is much overgrown with weeds, making 
attractive cover on both sides of the 
strips of buckwheat. 

Our experiments with quail will be 
conducted on a much larger scale next 
season and visitors who have cards can 
learn more by visiting the place during 
the breeding season than I can -eport 
in writing about it. 



Our experiments in shipping one day 
old wild ducks and pheasants were re- 
ported at the time. A shipment of one 
day old ducks in the mail from Massa- 
chusetts to the game farm on Long 
Island resulted in no loss and the young 
ducks successfully were reared. One 
day old pheasants shipped to other places 
were quite successful. In one case the 
birds were three days in transit and the 
loss was a little over ten per cent. 



108 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Wild Turkeys. 

Our experiment with wild turkeys was 
a failure. Eggs sent from Virginia were 
successfully hatched under a hen and 
the young birds lived several weeks when 
they all died. The birds were hatched 
late and the weather being very warm 
I am inclined to think that the young 
birds could not stand confinement in the 
coop at night. We knew, of course, that 
the turkeys should have a turkey mother 
and that they should have been reared 
differently, but we had no turkey and 
gave the young birds to a hen on this 
account. We have reared turkeys very 
successfully with turkey hens, permitting 
the birds to roost in trees at night, and 
the only trouble we ever had was from 
vermin, the great horned owl doing the 
most damage. 



Prairie Grouse. 

Our proposed experiment with prairie 
grouse failed for the very conclusive 
reason that we could not procure birds 
anywhere in America to lay the eggs. 
A large amount of time and considerable 
money were given to the effort to secure 
birds. Many promises were made which 
could not be kept for one reason or an- 
other, and the breeding season passed 
while we were still trying to procure 
stock birds. 

Failures in any experimental work 
have their value as well as successes. 
We learn something from both. In 
proving beyond a reasonable doubt that 
it was impossible in the year of our 



Lord 1918 to procure a single pair of 
prairie grouse anywhere in America we 
performed a public service, since the re- 
sult will be that others besides ourselves 
will have prairie grouse for breeding 
purposes next year. It does not seem 
to be a creditable performance to spend 
millions of dollars every year in order 
to save the game if the result is to be 
that no one can secure any breeding 
stock in order to increase the number of 
birds of a species as valuable as the 
grouse are for sport or for food. 

Intelligent state game officers agree 
with us that there should be some way 
for restoring grouse shooting and that 
sportsmen in the grouse states should 
have something more than the prohibi- 
tion of shooting in return for their 
money. It is not desirable to substitute 
pheasants for the grouse. We should 
have both. No one who understands 
the subject believes that grouse can be- 
come a food supply or even that shooting 
can be perpetuated unless some grouse 
be bred by those willing to undertake 
such industry. There can be no grouse 
breeding without grouse to lay the eggs 
and probably our experiment in breeding 
grouse, in answer to the plea of our 
friend Dr. Fisher, of the Biological Sur- 
vey, that this industry be undertaken, 
may be the most valuable of all our ex- 
periments, since if the Survey is inter- 
ested in seeing these birds bred it should 
cast its influence on the side of those 
who are willing to do the breeding. It 
must be evident that the game law busi- 
ness, so far as the grouse are concerned, 
has been much overdone. 



PLAN FOR A QUAIL FARM OR RANCH. 

By The Editor. 



Any farm where grain is grown is 
suitable for a quail ranch or preserve. 
A number of adjoining farms where the 
right to produce and harvest quail is 
rented can be made an ideal rearing 
ground for large numbers of quail. 
The rent of the headquarters farm, 
including buildings, a farm house, barn 



and outbuildings, varies in different lo- 
calities. $300 per year should secure a 
good farm in many states. The Game 
Breeders' Association pays $400 for a 
farm with excellent buildings about sixty 
miles from New York City. 

The right to breed and shoot game on 
adjoining farms usually can be rented 



THE GAME BREEDER 



109 



at from 5 to 10 cents per acre, or the 
amount of the taxes. It is wise to pay 
a little more and to rent small areas at 
the sides or corners of some of the fields 
to be planted, as suggested later, in or- 
der to provide good covers and abundant 
food for the quail in fields which other- 
wise would be uninhabitable, or at least 
unattractive and unsafe for the quail. 

Pastures for cattle, sheep and horses, 
hayfields and fields where certain kinds 
of plants are closely cultivated are not 
suitable or attractive for quail, but all 
of these fields can be made sufficiently 
attractive to hold one or more covies of 
quail by planting a very small area along 
one of the fences or in one or more cor- 
ners of the field with briars and several 
attractive quail foods. An old stump and 
a brush heap will make a safe cover and 
an attractive nesting site, provided grass 
clover, a little buckwheat or other small 
grain be planted, and some berry bushes 
and sunflowers can be added to advan- 
tage. The quarter or half acre planted 
for quail should be wired to keep out 
animals when the plantings are made in 
pastures. 

All sportsmen know at a glance what 
fields are attractive to quail. A corn or 
other grain field is usually a field in 
which a covey may be found, provided 
there are briars and weed and other 
covers at the fences and small woods are 
adjacent. 

Quail are seldom found in large wood- 
lands far from their boundaries, but 
such areas can be made attractive by cut- 
ting small clearings in the woods and 
planting grain and garden vegetables and 
berry briars in and around the clearings. 

If I were asked to state the three most 
important things to plant in the small 
areas reserved for the quail I would say, 
Briars, Briars, Briars. No fox can catch 
quail in a small briar patch; no hawk 
can strike them there, and the berries 
are acceptable food at the season when 
the fruit ripens and often in the winter, 
also when some of the blackberries or 
raspberries have dried on the plants. 
Sumacs and wild roses also are attrac- 
tive to quail. 

Two rows of raspberries or tall black- 



berries planted to make a double hedge 
between two fields or to surround an area 
reserved for the quail will make a safe 
and attractive nesting site, provided 
plenty of grass and small grain, sun- 
flowers and other foods be planted be- 
tween the briars. Weeds surely will put 
in an appearance and many of these 
bear seeds which are desirable foods 
for quail, young and old. Various 
plants will harbor grasshoppers and 
other insects. 

Where hand rearing is attempted the 
penned quail can be reared near the 
house and I believe it is a good plan to 
let the young birds run (with an old 
quail) when quite young, into fields 
especially planted for them. Strips of 
corn and buckwheat make excellent 
cover and food and rows of briars and 
occasional briar and weed patches in such 
fields will add much to their safety. The 
kitchen garden can be made an excellent 
place for one or two covies. 

Some corn and other grain can be har- 
vested from the home farm, but it is 
not desirable to cultivate the ground too 
closely where it is intended to make the 
quail a profitable crop. Where the fields 
are enclosed with rail fences it is an 
easy matter to plant the angles of the 
fences with briars and to plant a strip 
of buckwheat on one or both sides of the 
fence. A section of an old rail fence 
left standing or erected in any field will 
make an excellent nesting site, provided 
it be surrounded with briars and foods. 

It should be an easy matter, having a 
map of the farm showing each fields 
how it is utilized and how it is fenced,, 
to plan the planting of suitable small 1 
covers on the lines suggested, and it is; 
advisable, of course, to make the fields 
near the center of the place the most at- 
tractive and safe, because it is desirable- 
to hold as many birds as possible at some- 
distance from the boundaries. 

A few fields can be treated at a time 
or the whole work can be planned and 
carried out the first season. Quail sell 
readily at from $20 to $25 per dozen, 
and it should be an easy matter to figure 
if it is worth while to have one or more 
covies in each field. 



110 



THE GAME BREEDER 



I am inclined to believe quail can be 
induced to nest in places made attractive 
as indicated. An old stump with roots 
pointing upward as well as in a horizon- 
tal direction, the stump being overturned 
or laid on its side, will attract quail, and 
post or small tree placed near it will sug- 
gest to Mr. Bob-White the idea that 
there is a good perch from which he Can 
whistle to his mate. The quail ranch 
should be heavily trapped, of course, but 
ground traps should be sprung in the 
daytime and pole traps should be placed 
on high poles and in tall trees so as not 
to catch the quail as they do if placed on 
fence posts. 

A beat keeper going over the place 
constantly should be able to control a 
good part of the vermin and the briars 
will save many birds which would other- 
wise be destroyed. Where desirable, 
varieties of blackberries and raspberries 
are planted to make double hedges, or 
briar patches in the corners of the fields, 
the fruit should be quite worth while. 
An experiment with these berries will 
be made at the Long Island Game Breed- 
ers' Association this year. One of the 
raspberries which we will plant is adver- 
tised in this issue and I would advise 
our readers to try planting berry briars 
on their quail ranches and preserves. 

A very small area spaded up will make 
a desirable dusting place and sand and 
ashes can be added to advantage. A 
little grit and gravel scattered about the 
dust bath will be attractive. Quail are 
much given to visiting roads to dust 
themselves and possibly to procure grit. 
They no doubt can be induced to use 
good dusting places near their briar 
patches. A little corn and some wheat 
or other grain fed to the birds in and 
near the briars during the winter and 
■early in the spring should hold the birds 
in the places where we wish them to 
nest. Clover and lettuce seed will pro- 
vide attractive green foods if these be 
planted near the briars. Knowing, as 
we do, what the quail like to eat, it 
should be an easy matter to plant a few 
.attractive foods suitable for the different 
seasons. A very little planting of some 
of the grasses, berries and grains should 



induce the quail to nest and rear their 
broods in the places where we want 
them. It is, of course, desirable to have 
the birds somewhat evenly distributed on 
the farm and this can be accomplished 
by making numerous and very attractive 



nesting sites. 



We hope our readers who experiment 
with quail, breeding them wild in safe 
and attractive fields, will write some 
good reports of their work for The 
Game Breeder. Quail can be mated arbi- 
trarily and they will nest and rear their 
young in small pens. Such pens can be 
located near small covers, such as I have 
suggested, and the old and young birds 
will thrive better if liberated early and 
they will learn to escape their enemies. 

Where the farmers get a little rent for 
the right to breed game and to shoot it 
they are not, of course, in favor of put- 
ting quail on the song bird list. Where 
quail are produced abundantly on rented 
farms, good shooting is provided every 
year for many more guns than could 
safely shoot, provided most of the fields 
be unsuitable for quail as pastures, hay- 
fields and many others are. The sports- 
men who unite to share the expense of 
good quail shooting not only provide 
sport for themselves but for many others 
since the game overflows and, of course, 
the shooting should be kept open for 
everybody just as it is on Long Island, 
N. Y., where there are enough game 
clubs and farmers interested in quail to 
effectually prevent mischief makers from 
putting the quail on the song bird list 
or exterminating them, which would be 
the natural result should the clubs be put 
out of business. Ohio sportsmen easily 
can restore quail shooting provided they 
will offer to rent some of the farms and 
the expense per gun is very small. Pos- 
sibly it might be a good plan to have 
some counties opened to quail shooting 
as an experiment, or to provide that the 
farmers may rent quail shooting if they 
wish to do so. Many farmers, undoubt- 
edly, would like to shoot quail and to 
encourage the kind of shooting which 
keeps the quail plentiful and which also 
protects the farms against hawks and 
crows ; and also the trespassers on whose 



THE GAME BREEDER 111 

account, no doubt, the quail was made good shooting always is an inducement 

a songbird. . for young men to remain in the country. 

The farmer certainly should have the When a farmer wishes to sell his farm 

right to produce quail on his farm and he will find he can secure a much better 

to sell them if he wishes to do so. The price for it provided the purchaser can 

birds can be made a most valuable farm produce game than he can get provided it 

asset. The farmers should have the right be criminal to profitably produce this 

to breed any kind of plant or animal and desirable food. 

they can increase the value of their Why should it be a crime to profitably 

farms by having the quail law amended produce food on a farm? 
so as to provide that land owners can The answer that so . called sportsmen 

produce and sel quail or rent the shoot- wish tQ a dollar a year for the privi _ 

mg if they wish to do so. A farm is j of exterminating the game does not 

worth twice as much with game as an seem tQ be hi hl satis f actory . It has 

asset m many places as it is without nQt worked QUt weU in Qh[0; certainly 

game The farmers in Ohio evidently since nQ farmer; sportsman or other citi _ 

can do about as they please, but they zen can haye u tQ shoot or tQ 

will find that if they have the quail law ^ and the n should be a hi hl 

amended so that they can produce and rjrofitable croo 

sell quail and other game the crop can _, , .„ , ,, . . 
be made valuable as it is in all civilized The statesman who will handle this 
countries excepting America. They will <l ual1 problem m a businesslike manner 
find that game will be attractive to their need have n0 £ear of the farmers' vote 
boys and young men when they learn i n agricultural states, or the vote of in- 
flow to produce it and how to look after telligent sportsmen, all of whom are pre- 
it properly. There is a tendency in many pared to admit that it should not be a 
farming regions for the young men to crime to produce any kind of food on a 
leave the farm. Game breeding and farm. 



THE PRAIRIE HEN AND THE MARSH HAWK. 

Elmer Langevin. 

Is the prairie hen related to the cow- and one-half feet from the ground. The 

bird? This may seem a very foolish female was on the nest when I came up, 

question to ask but how did that per- and immediately started flying near me, 

fectly good prairie hen's eggs get into uttering her cries of distress, whereupon 

that marsh hawk's nest, I found today? the male made his appearance. I walked 

Containing a set of six perfectly fresh up to the nest and to my surprise found 

eggs and the prairie hen's eggs also per- six hawks, and one prairie hen's eggs. 

fectly fresh. 1 cannot believe that there I touched them and they were warm. I 

is a prairie hen in Minnesota that would took them to the car to blow out and all 

do such a thing as to entrust one of her seven eggs were perfectly fresh, not a 

babies to the care of a marsh hawk, but scratch or mark on the hen's egg. Well, 

I do believe that the marsh hawk there was a farm house not far off, prob- 

wouldn't hesitate a second to take a ably a quarter of a mile, so I thought I 

whole setting of prairie hen's eggs and would go over and see if some children 

carry them to his young to devour. At hadn't put that egg in the nest, but upon 

any rate his reputation up in this coun- inquiries I found only an elderly couple 

try is no better than Bill's because he living there and they were positively 

might do anything. sure that no one had been around, as the 

This nest in question was located in a closest neighbor is over a mile away 

small patch of willows and about two and they have no children. 



112 



THE GAME BREEDER 



The question now arises, Who is the 
guilty party? I say the hawk, because 
as I said before his reputation is bad, 
very bad, and I positively know that he 
steals several hundred dollars' worth of 
young chickens and turkeys each season 
from the farmers in this section. 

A farmer friend of mine called me up 
just a few days ago and told me he 
thought he knew where there was a 
marsh hawk's nest, because he says, 

"These hawks come and pick a 

chicken right out from under our feet 
and they do it each day and are abso- 
lutely not afraid to do it either." Well, 
I went right out to the farmer and he 
pointed out an old straw stack about half 
a mile off and said, "That is where they 
take my quality Rhode Island Reds," 
and sure enough there were the remains 
of several chicks, a female hawk over- 
head and a nice setting of five eggs not 
100 feet away. 

Another farmer also called me up some 
time ago and said he'd give any man 
$5.00 who would go out and kill the 
hawk that was taking an average of ten 
nice young chicks each day. Well, I 
went out, not for the $5.00 but for eggs, 
and sure enough, found a nest with a 



setting of five in a creek bottom. I shot 
the female, and that man hasn't lost a 
chick since, although they did get some 
40 out of his first hatch. 

On June 9th I saw a marsh hawk try- 
ing to steal a young turkey right in the 
presence of the mother, who made sev- 
eral attempts to lay out the offender by 
jumping up three or four feet in the air 
after it, but the hawk was too fast for 
her and when I ran up, flew away with 
empty talons. It took a Scotch Collie 
and I all we could do to stop one of 
them from stealing a pound chicken not 
100 feet away from a farm house last 
spring and if it hadn't been for the piece 
of poultry netting that the chick ran 
under he would have gotten him sure, 
regardless of my yelling and the dog 
barking, not more than 20 feet away. 
But revenge was ours, as his five young 
ones paid the penalty in a clump of wil- 
lows a half mile away. 

The grand old prairie hen is just about 
a thing of the past here and I believe 
that the marsh hawk is just as much and 
more to blame than the crow we hear 
so much about and offer a bounty on. 

The marsh hawk may like mice but he 
likes young chickens or turkey much 
better. — The Oologist. 



THE SAGE GROUSE. 

Opinion of Dr. A. K. Fisher, 
U. S. Biological Survey. 



The sage grouse, once a common and 
an abundant wild food bird on our vast 
western plains where the artemesia or 
wild sage grows abundantly, is doomed 
to extinction unless the states in which 
it is found awaken and give it pro- 
tection. 

So says Dr. A. K. Fisher of the U. S. 
Biological Survey in a newspaper clip- 
ping sent to The Game Breeder by a 
member of the Game Conservation So- 
ciety. Dr. Fisher also is of the opinion 
that the ruffed grouse, the prairie chick- 
en and the sharp-tailed grouse are pass- 
ing away. 

As objects of sport and as articles of 



food these American grouse already 
have passed away. They can, however, 
quickly be made tremendously abundant 
both for sport and for food. Regard- 
ing the sage grouse Dr. Fisher says: "I 
have an idea that the sage hen would 
make a very good domesticated fowl, 
and I am hoping that in some of our 
Western preserves within a very short 
time experiments will be made toward 
that end. Audubon mentions that prairie 
chickens were easy to breed, and states 
that he had large numbers in enclosures 
near Henderson, Ky.; in fact, they 
thrived so well that they became a nui- 
sance and were killed off. Later Dr. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



113 



George Grinnell had some birds in this 
state which did so well, and became so 
tame they would follow the plough, and 
after he turned them over to Mr. John 
Wallace, the veteran taxidermist, the 
latter found that they would bother him 
while he was spading his garden, as 
they searched for the insects that were 
turned up." 

There should be no possible objection 
to experiments in the domestication of 
any species of grouse or other game. 
We are inclined to believe that domesti- 
cation is not the best method of grouse 
breeding. So long, however, as it is legal 
and fashionable for state game wardens 
to raid people who have game birds or 
eggs in their possession for breeding 
purposes and to even seize mounted 
specimens (legally obtained) in the taxi- 
dermists' shops, and to generally create 
a reign of terror among those who would 
do anything practical or profitable, we 
may expect the grouse to vanish because 
no one will look after the birds prop- 
erly. To experiment it is necessary to 
have birds and eggs. 

There is a far better way of making 
and keeping the grouse abundant, cheap 
for sport and as articles of food. This 
has been tried in Scotland with the red 
grouse and there can be no possible doubt 
that the kind of practical protection 
given to grouse on the moors of Scotland 
if given a trial on the sage plains and 
on the prairies and farms in America, 
would result in a permanent abundance 
of all species of grouse as a cheap food 
supply for all of the people. 

What is needed is some big grouse 
ranches where the birds are properly 
looked after, just as sheep are looked 
after on sheep ranches and as cattle are 
looked after on cattle ranches. 

It is significant that it is legal in 
America to have cattle ranches and sheep 
ranches and even pheasant ranches, 
where pheasant have been made so abun- 
dant that advertisers in The Game 
Breeder are able to furnish hundreds of 
thousands of pheasants and millions of 
pheasant eggs every year to those who 
may wish to rear the birds or to sell 
them as food. When the laws made 
pheasant breeding a crime and those who 
reared these birds abundantly on the 



farms at Allamuchy, New Jersey, were 
fined thousands of dollars because they 
sent some of the food to the markets, 
there were only a few pheasants in 
America, and when the game keepers 
were discharged and the pheasant indus- 
try was given up in New Jersey it seemed 
likely that this food industry would 
come to an end. 

Dr. Fisher will be pleased to learn, 
no doubt, that as soon as it became legal 
to have wild ducks, readers of The 
Game Breeder quickly produced many 
hundreds of thousands of wild ducks 
and millions of wild duck eggs already 
have been sold in America. The writer 
produced several tons of wild ducks one 
year on a place where there was no 
water for ducks until an artificial pond 
was made. The Game Conservation So- 
ciety is well equipped to produce prairie 
grouse, sharp-tailed grouse and ruffed 
grouse, and if Dr. Fisher will tell us 
where it can procure a few hundred 
birds or a few dozen birds, it will quick- 
ly furnish a complete demonstration of 
grouse breeding in a wild state and in 
captivity and the demonstration will be 
carried forward as all the demonstra- 
tions of the society are to the point of 
harvesting the food crop by shooting over 
dogs. In this way our demonstration 
with two species of quail was carried 
out to the point where a few Gambel's 
quail and a few bob-whites were prop- 
erly (not otherwise) harvested and the 
triumph of the more game and fewer 
game laws movement was fittingly cele- 
brated when two species of quail were 
served at a luncheon in New York where 
a little red wine also was served with 
no fear of police interference. 

Egg Sales and Shipments. 

A few years ago large numbers of 
pheasant and wild duck eggs were 
shipped from the Eastern States to Cali- 
fornia and other Western States. We 
had records of as many as 5,000 eggs 
shipped from New England to the West 
with good results. This year it seems 
likely the big Western ranches will pro- 
duce the most eggs and that many thou- 
sands of eggs will be shipped to the 
Eastern States. 



114 



THE GAME BREEDER 



NOTES FROM THE GAME FARMS AND PRESERVES. 



Aviary Species. 

It is a good plan on any game preserve 
where pheasants, ducks and quail are 
reared for shooting to rear a few broods 
of aviary species of pheasants. Some 
Lady Amherst, Reeves, Golden, Silver 
and other handsome aviary pheasants 
easily can be reared by the game keeper 
who rears the sporting species. The 
birds are ornamental and some can be 
sold at excellent prices, and in this way 
money will be realized to pay part of 
the food bill. Our advertisers can fur- 
nish aviary species and their eggs but 
orders for these should be placed now 
in order to be sure of getting any birds 
or eggs. 



Quail Breeding in North Carolina. 

Air. W. B. Colenan, who made a small 
experiment breeding quail in Virginia a 
few years ago wrote an account of his 
work for The Game Breeder which was 
published with an illustration showing 
the young quail. This article attracted 
considerable attention and Mr. Coleman 
was offered a position with the Oketee 
Club in North Carolina where he has 
since continued his experiments with 
quail 

In a recent report, published in The 
Bulletin of the Protective Association, 
Mr. Coleman says he gathered nineteen 
hundred and eight eggs from fifty hen 
quail. On account of a shortage of set- 
ting hens 433 eggs could not be hatched. 
We would advise the Club to provide an 
incubator for Mr. Coleman another sea- 
son and information about the hatching 
of quail eggs in incubators will be fur- 
nished by The Game Conservation So- 
ciety on request. It is not a bad plan to 
place a large number of eggs in incu- 
bators and to give them to setting hens 
a day or two before they are hatched. 

Mr. Coleman reports that 280 eggs 
failed to hatch on account of ointment 
used on the setting hens. The insect 
powders, used by all game keepers, will 
prevent such a loss as this. 



Notwithstanding the losses, Mr. Cole- 
man may be said to have been success- 
ful, since he actually reared and turned 
down 509 quail out of 928 quail hatched. 

Most of the southern quail clubs em- 
ploy game keepers to properly look after 
the quail breeding wild in the fields. 
Vermin on some of the places is well 
controlled and the result is an abundance 
of quail every season. A game keeper 
on one of the places told the writer that 
he feared his birds were too abundant 
although several thousand had just been 
shot and we agreed with him that it 
would be wise to "thin them out," as he 
proposed doing. 

We long have believed that the best 
way to produce big numbers of quail is 
to breed the birds wild in the fields, 
made safe and attractive, just as. par- 
tridges are bred in the older countries, 
where very few attempts at hand-rearing 
are made with this species. The tendency 
of quail to increase in numbers is tre- 
mendous, the ratio of increase being geo- 
metrical. Where the fields are made at- 
tractive and the birds are in charge of 
beat keepers, who know how to trap and 
shoot, quail quickly can be made as 
abundant as it is desirable to have them, 
on any suitable area. Each beat keeper 
should have not over 800 or 1,000 acres 
to look after in America, where game 
enemies are more numerous than they are 
in the older countries. 

Hand-rearing experiments are inter- 
esting but they should only be regarded 
as supplemental to the wild rearing on 
quail preserves. The quail or partridge 
makes the best possible mother. The 
young birds are taught to find their food 
and to escape their enemies, two im- 
portant things which hand-reared birds 
do not learn in their infancy. The wild 
bred birds for many reasons may be re- 
garded as better than hand-reared birds 
ever are. 

We propose liberating some of our 
hand-reared birds next season, when 
they are only a few days old. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



116 



Valley Quail Successfully Reared. 

By N. C. Bryant. 
In the hope that the following facts 
regarding the breeding of valley quail 
may be of service to other breeders, we 
here detail our experiences. Three years 
ago there came into our possession a pair 
of valley quail. The female was a very 
young bird and was raised by hand. 
These birds were kept in an aviary along 
with many other small finches. The first 
year the female deposited 2 eggs, but 
would not incubate them ; later the same 
year the female deposited 22 eggs, but 
also deserted. The second year the first 
clutch contained about 18 eggs, but these 
were deserted. The second set was care- 
fully incubated by the male bird, the fe- 
male showing no inclination to sit on the 
eggs. Not a single tgg hatched, however. 
This year, 1918, 18 eggs were deposited 
and the female began incubating the first 
part of May. Twenty-three days later 
she came off the nest with 16 young. 
One of the chicks was found dead the 
first morning, and several others died 
soon after, probably owing to the fact 
that the male would not hover the young 
at night and the female could not cover 
so many growing birds. Nine were 
brought to maturity. Of this number 
eight were males. Another time we be- 
lieve that greater success can be attained. 
The young quail were fed on dry weevils, 
and later on weed seeds, obtained as 
screenings from threshing machines. — 
California Fish & Game. 



Aviary Pheasants. 

Pheasants are classified by English 
sporting writers as pheasants suitable for 
the aviary and pheasants suitable for 
sport. The Chinese ring-necked pheas- 
ant (P. Torquatus) and the common 
English pheasant (P. Colchicus) and the 
many half-breeds of these two species 
are the birds chiefly used for sporting 
purposes and for food in America as well 
as in England. The Mongolian pheas- 
ant (P. Mongolicus) and the Reeves 
pheasant are included in the class suit- 
able for sport and some of these large 
birds have been preserved and shot on 
English preserves. The first named is a 



big ring-necked pheasant and it has in- 
terbred with the common pheasant both 
in England and America. The Hon. 
Walter Rothschild contributed to the 
Encyclopedia of Sport a list of foreign 
pheasants probably suitable for introduc- 
tion. Some of these have been imported 
to America but their high price is suffi- 
cient to remove them from the sporting 
class and they well may be considered 
as aviary species since they only are so 
used. 

The aviary pheasants commonly seen 
in zoological gardens and private aviaries 
are the Golden, Silver and Lady Am- 
herst pheasants. Numerous other aviary 
species, all beautiful and costly, are dis- 
tinguished from the pheasants used for 
sport as easily as peacocks or parrots are 
and on this account the laws intended to 
protect our game birds should not and 
probably they do not apply to aviary 
species. The sooner the courts so hold 
the better it will be for the freedom of 
the citizens who may wish to have and to 
breed the beautiful aviary species of 
pheasants in their aviaries. 

It is absurd enough to arrest anyone 
for having game birds in his possession 
for breeding purposes but it is nothing 
short of a legal outrage to arrest any one 
for having aviary species of pheasants 
for breeding purposes or for selling and 
shipping these ornamental fowls which 
are not shot or eaten. The arrest and 
fining of one of our Oregon breeders 
recently for killing one of his golden 
pheasants in older to have it mounted 
by a taxidermist was a disgraceful out- 
rage in the name of the law and the 
laws should be amended everywhere so 
as to make it impossible for ignorant 
game wardens and justices of the peace 
to make arrests and to collect fines in 
such a scandalous manner. Before long 
if unchecked these people may be found 
arresting citizens who have canaries or 
peacocks in their possession, and con- 
fiscating the birds in addition to fining 
their owners. I doubt not they may ex- 
tend their activities to robbing hen roosts 
since there would be equal propriety in 
their so doing because our domestic poul- 
try is descended from the pheasant. 
State game officers who can not control 



116 



THE GAME BREEDER 



the activities of their game policemen or 
who may favor such practices in order 
to increase the receipts from fines should 
not be surprised if the people decide 
that the Governor of the State who has 
appointed them should be defeated for 
reelection, or if the people rise to demand 
the abolition of a department disgrace- 
ful to the State and a standing menace 
to the freedom of its citizens. For- 
tunately most of the States have highly 
creditable State game departments and 
commissions. There are only a few 
States where such performances as raid- 
ing aviaries or hen roosts in the name of 
the law are tolerated. 

If any member of the Game Conserva- 
tion Society should be arrested for hav- 
ing or killing an aviary pheasant we shall 
be glad to defend the case and to ask 
for the removal of the State officer. He 
should be compelled to respond in dam- 
ages to the complaint of the citizen. 



A Donation. 

One of our readers, sending a check 
for $15 says he recently filled a substan- 
tial order for another reader and al- 
though he had no advertisement in the 
magazine at the time, he appreciated that 
the business was due to a former adver- 
tisement. He suggests that the $15 will 
about pay for two meals in New York 
and that the editor use the money in this 
way. "Go down to the Grand Central 
Station restaurant," he says, "and eat 
it out, a couple of orders will just about 
take it, judging by what my 'small steak, 
bread and coffee cost me." 

We are too busy to spend any time in 
the manner suggested and we will use 
the money to procure live game for our 
experimental work. 

As a reason why he quit advertising, he 
says : "My trouble is in finding game to 
sell, not in selling. I don't want to have 
to write a lot of useless letters explaining 
that the advertisement is just running 
but don't mean what it says." 

Many game breeders are very new at 
the business for the very good reason that 
the business was criminal until quite re- 
cently when the "more game and fewer 
game laws" movement set things going 
in the right direction. Breeders who ex- 



pect to remain in the industry which is 
growing with startling rapidity should 
know that it is wise to keep up a corres- 
pondence with our readers and to en- 
deavor to procure game for them, other- 
wise the customers will forget them when 
game becomes abundant and the compe- 
tition is more lively than it now is. The 
Game Breeder reaches the people who 
can afford to buy game at present prices 
and we feel sure it is wise for those who 
expect to remain in the business to keep 
acquainted with our readers and to let 
them know that they expect to have more 
game quite soon. Those who are opposed 
to shooting clubs and to the game far- 
mers having any big customers are well 
pleased to see only a few people adver- 
tising game. The advertisements, how- 
ever speak louder than we can, and 
those who believe in the industry should 
advertise. 

We would advise all who expect to 
breed game this season to order their 
eggs now and to stipulate for early ship- 
ments. 



One Day Old Game Birds. 
The successful experiments made in 
shipping one day old pheasants and wild 
ducks last year proved that these birds 
can be shipped as safely as one day old 
chickens are. Small breeders and 
owners of country places are advised to 
purchase some one day old game birds 
and give them a trial. The hen used in 
hatching the eggs should be shipped with 
the brood in a separate package and the 
young birds can be reared by placing the 
hen in a coop with a small fender before 
it to hold the young birds for a few days. 
Later the fender should be removed and 
the young birds permitted to chase insects 
in the grass. Some breeders have liber- 
ated the hen with the young game birds 
and we have reports of successful rear- 
ing by this method. The hen and chicks 
wander in a safe field or orchard and ' 
are shut up in the coop at night. 



More Pheasants. 

Mr. Peter P. Carney, authority on 
sporting topics says : 

Pheasants to the number of 23,398 were im- 
ported in 1911. To-day not a pheasant is com- 



THE GAME BREEDER 



117 



ing into the country, and for a year or so be- 
fore the United States entered the war very 
few came in. 

He might have added that the output 
of four or five of the larger game farms 
now operating in the United States will 
total a somewhat larger number of 
pheasants than were imported in the 
year mentioned. There are also several 
thousand smaller pheasant breeders, each 
of whom produces from 100 to several 
thousand birds annually. There are 
numerous game clubs, some of which 
produce and shoot several thousand 
pheasants every year and there are num- 
erous country places in America whose 
owners consider a few hundred pheasants 
per year the proper caper. Since orders 
for tens of thousands pheasant eggs can 
be filled readily by some of the larger 
breeders and all quickly sell out every 
season, it seems likely that the United 
States soon will be the biggest pheasant 
producing country in the world if it is 
not to-day. We think it likely it is, since 
game breeding was checked in the Euro- 
pean countries on account of the war. 

Numerous State game farms also turn 
out a few thousand pheasants every year 
and we . printed a story about a few 
thousand reared by the convicts in a 
Western State prison. This year will be 
a big year for quail and wild duck breed- 
ing also. 



The progress of the "more game and 
fewer game laws" movement was cele- 
brated at a recent dinner in New York 
City, where two species of quail, Gam- 
bel's and Bob-whites, were served. Both 
of the foods were produced by industry 
on a New York farm and both were 
taken not "otherwise than by shooting." 
The ammunition used in the taking is 
advertised in The Game Breeder. 



shot, sold and eaten by sporting readers 
of The Game Breeder. The reason for 
the abundance is well known to the older 
members of The Game Conservation So- 
ciey. New members will be interested 
to learn that more foreign fowls than 
American quail and grouse are produced 
because the laws in many of the States 
prevent the production of American 
game. Massachusetts is in the lead, as 
usual, showing the people by practical 
experiments how to rear quail. 

Quail breeding has made great prog- 
ress during the year. Many members of 
The Game Conservation Society now 
breed large numbers of quail and it will 
not be long before those who wish to 
procure quail and quail eggs in large 
numbers can do so. Quail are easily 
reared in a wild or semi-wild state on 
protected areas ; they also have been 
produced in good numbers in pens and 
small rearing fields by hand-rearing 
methods somewhat similar to those used 
by pheasant breeders. 

The quail are comparatively small 
eaters and experiments made by The 
Game Conservation Society indicate that 
the young birds thrive best when they 
are fed very little, provided they can 
procure green weed-seeds and insects in 
safe gardens. Ohio and other good 
quail States should encourage and not 
prevent quail breeding for profit and for 
sport. 

* 

Pheasants Wanted. 

Wanted — One thousand pheasants for 
October delivery. Write stating prices. 
Any breeder willing to make a contract 
to rear pheasants can have an order for 
the birds now, provided the price is satis- 
factory. Address, stating price. 

A New Shooting Club, 
Care of The Game Breeder. 



There is a good reason why foreign 
pheasants have become abundant and are 
used as food in many parts of America. 
These birds are so abundant in many of 
the States that many hundreds of thou- 
sands of eggs and birds are sold through 
advertisements in The Game Breeder an- 
nually and many thousands of birds are 



Contract Rearing. 

In the older countries many pheasants 
and other game birds are reared by con- 
tract. We have had several inquiries 
recently from shooting clubs and from 
individuals if any of the breeders in 
America would rear birds to be deliv- 



118 



THE GAME BREEDER 



ered in the fall. We believe any breeders 
who may wish to do so can secure orders 
for birds at a price to be agreed upon, 
provided they will place an advertisement 
offering to breed birds under a contract. 

Breeders easily can sell their birds 
with the understanding that they are to 
be shipped when quite young and it 
should be desirable to have orders in ad- 
vance so that the breeder will know just 
when he can receive the cash for young 
birds. 

Breeders are advised to offer one day 
old pheasants and wild ducks. Our ex- 
periments indicate that they can be 
shipped safely just as one day old chick- 
ens are. 



Last January we expressed the hope 
that we would be able to collect some 
game for the hospitals and also to breed 
some for this purpose. We were so late 
in getting started and we found it so 
nearly impossible to secure American 
game birds for breeding purposes, and 
so many of our members went into the 
service and temporarily abandoned game 
breeding, that it soon became evident 
that we could not conduct our charitable 
experiment. Some readers offered to 
donate a few birds, but the big demand 
for live birds for breeding purposes, 
created by The Game Breeder, and our 
inability to finance the project properly, 
on account of the increased cost of paper, 
printing and postage, forced us, reluct- 
antly, to abandon our proposed activity. 
We hope it will not be long before the 
Society has a fund sufficient to move all 
the game contributed and also to purchase 
game and to breed some, to be distrib- 
uted. Now that good shooting is to be 
undertaken again on a much larger scale 
than ever before, we think it likely we 
soon will be able to do what we could 
not possibly do during the last year. 



Canada geese, Mr. Hunt has outdone 
his best previous paintings, so many of 
which this company has had the privi- 
lege of reproducing for the public. In 
conception, action, draftsmanship and 
color it is superbly true to life. Natur- 
ally, such a faithful reproduction of a 
truly great painting will be highly valued 
by sportsmen everywhere throughout 
the world. The demand for this cal- 
endar will surely be greater than the 
supply, therefore should you, for any 
reason, be willing to pass your copy 
along to some sportsman friend, he no 
doubt will thank you for it. 

Our only criticism of this excellent 
calendar would be chat possibly the eagle 
does not strike geese in the manner pic- 
tured. He often, and usually, we be- 
lieve, strikes from below, driving his 
talons into the under side of his quarry ; 
and sometimes both of the big birds fall 
to the water together, when the eagle 
tows his goose to a sandbar to devour it. 
However, the want of a few facts should 
never interfere with a good story or 
picture and possibly an eagle striking 
from above is more dramatically pictorial 
than one striking from below would be. 



Some Wild Geese. 

You know the work of Lynn Bogue 
Hunt. In his chosen field he stands su- 
preme in America today — our greatest 
painter of game birds. In the subject of 
this calendar, a golden eagle attacking 



QUESTIONS. 
Is Cookery a Science? 

Editor Game Breeder: 

In our State the possession, killing 
and sale of pheasants and partridges is 
unlawful except for scientific or propa- 
gating purposes. I wish to cook some 
of these birds and write to ask if cook- 
ing would be a scientific purpose within 
the meaning of the statute. 

A Delaware Reader. 

Cookery at one time ranked as an art, 
a familiar expression was, "the culinary 
art," but recently cooking has been ele- 
vated to a science. It is taught in the 
colleges and degrees are given to those 
who propose to teach it. At Columbia 
it is regarded as a science and an art. It 
is highly scientific since it deals with 
chemistry and you will hear professors of 
cookery talk in terms of proteins and 
other things suitable for the human 



THE GAME BREEDER 



119 



frame, its maintenance and upbuilding. 
There can be no doubt that a pheasant 
scientifically prepared will nourish a per- 
son far better than one prepared by a 
novice. 

Mr. Kettner made his living by the 
science which Savarin cultivated as a 
connoisseur, says Shand, and you will 
note this authority uses the word 
"science," as a matter of course. One 
fact is quite certain, if you own a bird 
you can cook it and eat it even if the 
preparation be not wholly scientific. Be 
sure that you have legally acquired your 
pheasant, either by purchase from an 
advertiser in The Game Breeder or by 
the industrious process of rearing and 
shooting it and we are quite sure your 
courts will hold that it is not criminal 
to eat your food and that the laws in- 
tended to save the vanishing wild game 
in your State do not apply to game leg- 
ally owned by individuals. — Editor. 



Game Breeder; if they cannot fill the 
order, come again and we will steer some 
elk your way. Before we give advice or 
attempt to get game for readers it is 
necessary for them to write that adver- 
tisers cannot procure the game wanted. 
— Editor. 



Comparative Value of Cocks and Hens. 

One more question, which is regarded 
as the better bird for the table, the cock 
or the hen pheasant? 

We have never been able to see much 
difference between cocks and hens on 
the table when both are quite young. 
Probably there would not be much dif- 
ference between the sexes when both 
are quite old. We never eat very old 
pheasants. They should be preserved for 
game pies and probably should be stewed 
until tender. The illustrious Gouffe and 
other famous cooks have recommended 
the selection of cocks for the plats, being 
betrayed, apparently by meritricious ad- 
miration for gay plumage. Alexander 
Innes Shand fancies "This is a survival 
of the barbaric tradition of sending birds 
in their feathers to the tables . . ." 
There can be no doubt whatever that 
whether as a maid in her first season or 
a juvenile matron, the hen is infinitely 
superior to the cock." 



Editor Game Breeder : 

Please tell me where to purchase the 
best Elk (Wapiti) for a preserve. 

M. R. 

Write to the larger advertisers in The 



A Small Start and a Good Business. 

An Oregon reader says : 'T am in the 
wild fowl business in a small way. I 
have about 125 ring-necked hens for 
breeders, also a few Goldens, Silvers 
and Reeves. The place has a lake on it 
that covers ten acres. I have quite a 
number of wild water fowl on this lake, 
including swans, seven kinds of wild 
geese and several kinds of wild ducks. 

This season I raised between six and 
seven hundred ring-necks and sold 2,000 
eggs from 100 breeding hens. I began 
with three ring-neck hens and built up 
from them to where I am now, learning 
the business from year to year until I 
made good. 

Millions of Eggs. 

Reports coming to The Game Breeder 
indicate that over two million pheasant 
and wild duck eggs will be hatched or 
sold by the owners of American game 
farms and preserves the coming season. 
Several hundred thousand eggs also will 
be hatched and distributed by state game 
farms. 

Stock Birds. 

Some of the members of the Game 
Conservation Society report that they 
are holding as many as four hundred 
pheasant hens for breeding purposes. A 
few places have more than this number. 
Several quail breeders will have an hun- 
dred or more quail hens and since the 
average number of eggs for each hen 
quail is from 40 to 50 it is evident that 
thousands of quail will be produced by 
hand-rearing; and on the big quail pre- 
serves where quail are bred wild in pro- 
tected fields many more thousands of 
quail will be produced. On some of the 
places from one to two and possibly 
three thousand quail will be shot during 
the next shooting season. 



120 



THE GAME BREEDER 



T*J5 Game Breeder 



Published Monthly 



Edited by DWIGHT W. HUNTINGTON 



NEW YORK, JANUARY, 1919. 
TERMS: 

10 Cents a Copy— $1.00 a year in Advance. 

Postage free to all subscribers in the United States. 
To All ForeignCountriesand Canada, $1.25. 

The Game Conservation Society, Inc. 
publishers, 150 nassau st., new york 

D. W. Huntington, President, 

F. R. Peixotto, Treasurer, 

J. C. Huntington, Secretary. 
E. Dayton, Advertising Manager. 
Telephone, Beekman 3685. 



EXPERIMENTS WITH GAME. 

Our knowledge of how to have game 
and how to look after it properly is com- 
paratively limited since before the "more 
game and fewer game laws" movement 
was started few people in America had 
any game or knew anything about how 
to increase its numbers by scientific 
game breeding. 

Many English and Scotch game keep- 
ers have demonstrated how easy it is to 
hand-rear large numbers of pheasants 
and wild ducks in America. Other 
game keepers who have handled our 
quail in a large way have bred these 
birds in a wild state successfully just as 
partridges are bred wild in protected 
fields in the older countries, where stock 
birds and eggs are abundant, easily pro- 
cured and comparatively cheap. 

Experiments with wild turkeys made 
by members of the Game Conservation 
Society at a number of places indicate 
that although the American wild turkey 
is classed by the Ornithologists as a 
pheasant — the largest in the world — it 
is not advisable to attempt to rear wild 
turkeys with common barn yard hens as 
foster mothers since the young turkeys 
do not thrive with common fowls as the 
young pheasants do. Young turkeys are 
known to thrive nicely with turkey 
mothers wild or tame and the larger the 
range given to the young birds the better. 



The experiments made by the Game 
Conservation Society during the lastr 
year with American game birds were 
confined to quail and turkeys, since it 
was impossible to get any grouse. 



PREVENTIVE LAWS. 

Often we have quoted the naturalist, 
Dr. R. W. Shufeldt, who wrote that he 
was opposed to laws which protected the 
game off the face of the earth. 

We formed the opinion long ago that 
a bag limit law permitting many guns to 
take a very few birds per gun in a sea- 
son would prove fully as disastrous to 
upland game birds as the bag limit law 
which permitted a smaller, number of 
guns to take a larger number of game 
birds. 

The additional check to the increase of 
the species practically is the same. All 
real naturalists agree that additional 
checks to increase (shooting for exam- 
ple) cause a rapid diminution of the 
numbers of the species just as a removal 
of some of the checks to increase (ver- 
min for example) cause a rapid increase 
in the numbers of the species. 

Bag limit laws when applied to game 
breeders are worse than legal absurdities. 
Such laws plainly prevent a food produc- 
ing industry, since anyone who breeds a 
thousand quail or grouse or pheasants on 
his farm or game ranch at some expense 
will quickly go out of business if he be 
arrested and fined for shooting more than 
three or some other small number of 
birds in a season or for selling the food. 

Laws prohibiting the sale of game, 
alive and dead, and game eggs evidently 
are as fatal as bag limit laws are to a 
food producing industry especially suit- 
able to the American farms. Grouse and 
quail, since the birds are said to eat some 
insects and weed seeds and are beneficial 
and not harmful to agriculture, should 
be produced abundantly. It is absurd to 
say to farmers and sportsmen that these 
birds are beneficial and therefore you 
must not make them profitably plentiful. 
It is equally absurd to say to the farmers 
you may rear foreign pheasants for profit 
which may, possibly in some cases, be 



THE GAME BREEDER 



121 



detrimental to agriculture and require 
scare boys to keep them out of the fields, 
but you must not produce our native 
quail and grouse, which are beneficial to 
agriculture and which can be produced 
cheaply since they will find most of their 
food in the fields and woods. 

Laws shortening the season, of course, 
are inimical to the game breeding indus- 
try, since the producer of any food 
should not be required to sell it only dur- 
ing one month in the year. 

The pheasants and certain species of 
wild ducks quickly became abundant' on 
many game farms as soon as the preven- 
tive laws were amended so as to permit 
the profitable breeding of these birds. 
Quail also have been made tremendously 
abundant in places where the laws are not 
too restrictive to prevent any industry 
being applied to increase their numbers. 
American grouse purchased and liberated 
in a place where there were no grouse 
soon became very plentiful and restocked 
miles of territory, just as the grouse 
quickly became plentiful on all the moors 
of Scotland when the necessary industry 
was applied to make these birds abun- 
dant. The birds are bred wild on the 
moors and protected against natural en- 
emies just as our grouse should be bred 
on the prairie. 

Often we have pointed out that sport 
has nothing to fear from an abundance 
of game on many places where it is prop- 
erly looked after. Such abundance makes 
it not necessary to put the food birds on 
the song bird list and to prohibit shoot- 
ing for terms of years or forever. 

The country is large and it has been 
found that comparatively little land is 
used by game farms and shooting clubs 
in the States where game breeders' laws 
have been enacted. Sportsmen who 
unite to share the expense of producing 
game on farms where it no longer occurs 
or where shooting always is prohibited 
evidently not only provide good shoot- 
ing for themselves, often at very small 
expense, but also provide shooting for 
those who do nothing in the way of 

game production. 

■• 

We are much pleased to observe that 
many of those who were opposed to all 



of the ideas advanced by The Game 
Breeder now have accepted many or all 
of them. We observe that there is a 
tendency and a willingness on the part 
of patriotic state officers to encourage 
the food and sport producers; to grant 
them licenses to take birds and eggs for 
breeding purposes and not to compel 
them to send all their money abroad to 
purchase foreign birds which are no bet- 
ter, if as good as our own. 



OUTINGS AND INNINGS. 
Camouflage Department, B. C. 

The Little Greek — Daddy, what did 
you do in the Trojan War? 

Daddy (proudly) — My child, I 
painted the spots on the wooden horse. 
■ — London Punch. 



Before the War. 

Maybe you also remember the good 
old times when a person could buy a 
nickel's worth of cheese and crackers 
and get some of both. — Dallas News. 



Experienced. 

Officer — You are the coolest man un- 
der fire I ever saw. 

Soldier — Oh, I'm quite used to being 
shot at. I was an Adirondack guide, 
sir, for years, , 



The Limit of Economy. 

Rankin — He is a very economical man. 
Phyle — What makes you think so? 
Rankin — Why, he even saves the tacks 
he pulls out of his tires. — Boston Globe. 



Deer Jumped Through Engine. 
Carlisle, Pa., Dec. 7. — Attempting \o 
jump across a cut in advance of a train, 
a young buck jumped partly through the 
window of a cab on the Philadelphia and 
Reading Railroad near here. The engi- 
neer and fireman had narrow escapes 
from injury. The deer was dragged and 
killed. 

♦ 

A Good New Year's Resolution. 
I will send three new subscriptions for 
The Game Breeder. 



122 



THE GAME BREEDER 




TEINCES 

FOR GAME PRESERVES 

The accompanying photograph shows one of our Non-Climbable 
" RIOT " fences, erected by us, with our indestructible steel fence post 
8 feet high, surrounding the Yale Bowl Field, New Haven, Conn. 

This fence held in check 80,000 people who attended the Harvard- 
Yale Game, November 25th, 1916, and 60,000 people who attended the 
Princeton-Yale Game, November 13th, 1915. 

We have this fence and many other excellent designs. It will be 
to your advantage to secure our Catalogue, that shows many of the 
best erected fences in this country; also tells about our posts in 
detail ; how to erect a fence ; how to paint the fence wire to keep it 
from rusting. 

Become acquainted with our fence building system. It will save 
you many dollars and a great deal of worry. 

Fences for every purpose, with either straight or non-climbable post, 
tennis court back stops, etc., erected by our trained men anywhere. 

J. M. DOWNS 

38 ROOSEVELT AVENUE Suite A JERSEY CITY, INI. J. 



RIVER LAWN GAME FARM 

R. H. S1DWAY 

GRAND ISLAND, ERIE: CO., N. Y. 

Young Pheasants for Fall delivery 

extra fine, healthy non-related birds. 

My birds are raised for my own shooting and are very strong 

on the wing. 



Member of The Game Guild. 



Member American Game Breeders Society. 



THE HONEYSWEET 

BLACK RASPBERRY 

Best /or Home and Market 

The bushes make good cover for game. 

Strawberry and Asparagus Plants. 

Price Lists Free. 

A. B. KATKAMIER MACEDON, N. Y. 



FREE FOUNDATION STOCK 

furnished to raise Rabbits, Cavies or 
Pigeons. Send dime for particulars and 
paper. 

Young's Tanning Compound, easily applied to any 
skin, large can $1.00, trial can 50c. Tattoo Ear 
Marker $1.50. Ear Tags 30c per dozen. Gibson's 
wonderful Rabbit Book $1.00. Cavy Book 50c. 
Squab Culture, a recognized authority on raising 
pigeons for profit, $1.00. 

NATIONAL FANCIER & BREEDER 

335 South East Avenue, Oak Park, III. 



Phone, 9286 Farragut FINE FURS 

JOHN MURGATROYD 

Taxidermist 

57 WEST 24th STREET 
Bet. Broadway and 6th Ave. NEW YORK 

Finest Work at Reasonable Prices 
Call and See for Yourself 



The Breeders' and Fanciers' News 

SCRANTON, PA. 

devoted to the breeding and marketing of ducks 
geese, turkeys (including the wild varieties), rab- 
bits, cavies. pigeons, etc. Organ of the American 
Buttercup Club, and Waterfowl Club of America. 
Interesting and instructive articles by able writers. 

50c a Year, 3 Years for $1.00 
Canada 75c a Year, 3 Years $1.75 

Special Trial Offer in U. S-, 8 Months for 25c 

AD. RATES: 75c an inch, or for 3 months or more 
at rate of 65c an inch. Classified, 2c a word. 

Address 
BREEDERS' AND FANCIERS' NEWS 

1558 Dickson Ave., St ronton. Pa. 



In writing- to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sifrn your lettera: "Youra for More Game." 



THE GAME BREEDER 123 



Pheasants, Wild Mallard Ducks & Wild Turkeys 

FOR SALE 

Hatched This Year 

Tamarack Farms, Dousman, Waukesha County, Wis. 



WILD DUCK POODS 

Wild Celery, Sago Pond Weed, Widgeon Grass, Red-Head Grass, Chara and other foods which 
attract water fowl. We have the best duck foods which will attract and hold the game and which 
impart the finest flavor to the flesh. We plan and arrange the plantings suitable to all waters. 

GOOD SHOOTING 

DURING THE OPEN SEASON 

I am prepared to entertain a number of sportsmen who wish to shoot wild geese, Canvasback and 
other wild ducks and quail, snipe, etc. Only small parties can be properly looked after. Appoint- 
ments to try the shooting and learn about the wild duck foods are made by correspondence. 

J. B. WHITE WATERLILY, CURRITUCK SOUND, NORTH CAROLINA 

' Member of THE GAME GUILD 



Game Wanted 

€J We are in the market to buy game birds and deer 
raised on licensed game preserves. We can use 
quantities of venison, pheasants and mallard duck 
raised on licensed game farms and preserves which can 
be sold in New York State throughout the year but 
coming from points outside of New York State preserves 
must also have the New York State License in order to 
be permitted to ship in this State and be sold here. 

If you have game to sell, let us hear from you. 

House of A. SUZ 

414-420 West 14th Street -:- NEW YORK CITY 

Cable Address, SILZ, NEW YORK, Telephone, CHELSEA 4900 



In writing: to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game.' 



124 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Wild Mallard Ducks 
and Ringneck Pheasants 

WRITE FOR PRICES 



Scarboro Beach Game Farm 



Hi 



R. E. BULLOCK, Manager 

SCARBORO, - MAINE 

Member of the Game Guild 

We Furnish Eggs in Season 



^mmsmmnntm. 





PROFITS IN FUR FARMING 

Learn about the wonderful Black Fox 
Industry which has proven so profitable 
to breeders. 

Read the Black Fox Magazine, the only 
paper of its kind in the world. 

SAMPLE COPY FREE. 
Subsc iption $1.50 per year. 

THE BLACK FOX MAGAZINE 

1 5 Whitehall Street, New York 




Established 1860 



Telephone 4569 Spring 



FRED SAUTER 

Leading Taxidermist of America. 
42 Bleecker Street New York City 

Corner Lafayette Street Subway Station at the Door 

Specialist in All Branches of Taxidermy 

Write for Illustrated Catalogue 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



125 




WE HAVE 

For Sale 

Silver, Golden, Ring- 
neck, Lady Amherst, 
Formosan, White, 
Mongolian, Reeves, 
Swinhoe, Versicolor, Impeyan, Soem- 
mering, Manchurian Eared, Melano- 
tic, Black Throat Golden, Linneated 
and Prince of Wales Pheasants. 

Wild Turkeys, Japanese Silkies, 
Longtails, Mallard Ducks, S. C. Buff 
and Blue Orpingtons and R. I. Reds. 
Five varieties of Peafowl, Crane, 
Swan, Fancy Ducks, Doves, Deer, 
Jack Rabbits. 

Send $1.00 fornew Colortppe Catalogue. Where 

purchase amounts to $10.00, price of 

catalogue refunded. 

CHILES & COMPANY 

MT. STERLING KENTUCKY 

Member of The Game Guild 
Member of The American Game Breeders Society 



Encouraging Signs. 

Almost everywhere in America we see 
signs that the advice of The Game 
Breeder has been heeded. Many laws, 
some of which were written or partly 
written, by request, in the office of The 
Game Breeder, have been enacted per- 
mitting the breeding and sale of all or 
certain species of game. A fatal trouble 
soon appeared when the breeders, began 
looking about for quail, grouse and other 
indigenous game, and for eggs for breed- 
ing purposes. The laws, it appeared, al- 
though permitting the people to produce, 
prohibited them from procuring breeding 
stock and eggs. They might as well per- 
mit shooting and deny the right to have 
a gun, or permit fishing with a rod with- 
out a hook. 

Our readers will recall our activities 
in trying to remedy this situation. We 
pointed out often the absurdity of per- 
mitting every one to kill 25 or some other 
number of birds in a day for a $1.00 li- 
cense, and in charging the producer $5 
or $25 for a license to produce and ar- 
resting him and fining him $15,000 or 



FOR SALE, WELL-BRED SETTERS 

Dogs Trained for Shooting. 

Young Dogs Suitable for Training. 

WRITE FOR PRICES 

THE RIVER LAWN KENNELS 

Grand Island Erie Co., New York 

Member of The Game Guild 



DOGS 



HOUNDS-ALL KINDS. BIG50PAGE CATALOGUE 
10£. ROOKWOOD KENNELS, Leungton, Kentucky. 

THE BLUE GRASS FARM KENNELS, of Berry, Ky., 
offer for sale setters and pointers, fox and cat hounds, 
wolf and deer hounds. Coon and opossum hounds, var- 
mint and rabbit hounds, bear and lion hounds, also Aire- 
dale terriers. All dogs shipped on trial, purchaser to 
judge the quality, satisfaction guaranteed or money re- 
funded. Sixty page, hiehly illustrated, instructive and 
interesting catalogue for ten cents in stamps or coin, 

AIREDALE TERRIERS. The genuine one-man dog- 
Pedigreed, registered pups. Males $25.00. Females. 
$15.00. Guaranteed Satisfactory. L. E. GALLUP, 220Q 
Ogden, Omaha, Nebraska. 



some other amount if he took a few birds 
alive for breeding purposes. 

If field sports tend to keep people in 
the country, as Lecky, the historian, says 
they do ; if they add to farm values and 
give employment to many rural labor- 
ers ; if they keep the markets full of 
cheap game for the people to eat, we are 
inclined to the belief that sport can be 
kept alive in America and that its ene- 
mies can not put an end to it. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



126 



THE GAME BREEDER 




WILD TURKEYS 

Pure Bred Wild Turkeys 

Eggs in Season 

MARY WILKIE 

Beaver Dam, Virginia 

Member of the Game Guild 





PHEASANTS, PIGEONS AND 
EGGS. 

Pheasants, Amherst, Silver, Gold- 
en, Reeves, Mongolian, Swinhoe, 
Versicolor, Ringnecks, Cochin 
Bantams, White King Pigeons. 
Eggs in Season. 

BLUE RIBBON POULTRY AND PHEASANT FARM 

Davenport Neck, Phone 655, New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Member of the Game Guild. 



REGISTERED BLACK FOXES, 
TROUT & HARES. 
Rugged pups, bred on highest 
ranch in America. 1917 Breeding 
Record. 8 litters from 8 females. 
Also Mountain Brook Trout. Milch 
Goats. Belgium and Flemish Hares. 

BORESTONE MOUNTAIN 
FOX RANCH 
Onawa - Maine 
Member of the Game Guild. 



MALLARDS AND BLACK DUCKS. 

Guaranteed Pure Bred Wild 
Ducks. Eggs in season. 15 Mal- 
lard eggs, $4.00, 100 eggs $25. 
15 Black Duck eggs, $8.00, 
100 eggs, $35. 

F. B. DUSETTE, 
Bad Axe, Michigan. 

Order Breeding Stock now to be 
grown for next season. There is 
a limit on Pure Wild stock. 

Member of the Game Guild. 
Do not write for prices or infor- 
mation. Send check. If birds do not please you 
return them and your money will be returned at once. 



LIVE GAME, ELK, DEER, WILD 
Turkeys, Quail, Pheasants, 
Ducks, and all other game. Eggs 
in season. See space advertise- 
ment. 

W. J. MACKENSEN.Yardley, Pa. 
Member of the Game Guild. 







DARK MALLARD 
Black Duck, Mallard Hybrids 

These ducks are reared on free range 
especiallyfor shooting and for decoys. 
They are strong on the wing. Big 
egg producers under control 
Price $3.50 per pair ; $1.75 each 

ALBERT F. HOLMES 

8 Bosworth St., Boston, Mass. 

Member of the Game Guild 



BREEDER OF FANCY PHEASANTS 

Eggs in season. Amhersts, Silver, 
Golden, Versicolor, Mongolian, 
Reeves, Ringnecks, Manchurian, 
Elliott, Swinhoe, Impeyan, Mela- 
notus, Soemmering. 

GRAY'S 
GOLDEN ^ POULTRY FARM 
Gifford Gray, Orange, New Jersey 

Member of the Game Guild. 



DR. FRANK KENT 

Importer Bob White Quail 

San Antonio, Texas. 

Book your orders now for early 

Fall and Spring delivery. 

Bank references. 

Member of the Game Guild. 



SEA CLIFF PHEASANTRY 

We have nearly all, of the rare pheas- 
ants and cranes, also white, Java and 
black shouldered Japanese Peafowl. 
Mandarin ducks. Eggs in Season for 
sale. Write for prices and particu- 
lars. 

BALDWIN PALMER 

Villa Serena, Sea Cliff, Long Island, N. Y. 

Member of the Game Guild. 6t 



PHEASANTS 
ENGLISH, RINGNECKS 

Pearl White Guineas and White 

Cochin Bantams 
Baby Pheasants and Eggs in Season 

THE HIRSCH POULTRYYARDS 
45th Place, Lyons, Illinois 



WILD DUCKS 
The practical rearing of wild ducks 
is fully described in the illustrated 
book, "Our Wild Fowl and Waders, " 
written by the Editor of the Game 
Breeder. Price $2.00 post paid. 

THE GAME CONSERVATION 

SOCIETY, Publishers 

150 Nassau St., New York 







In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sigrn your letters: "Yours for More Gam« ' 



THE GAME BREEDER 



127 





GAME BIRDS 

All American game birds are fully 

described in the illustrated book, 

"Our Feathered Game, " written by 

the Editor of the Game Breeder 

Price $2.00 

For sale by 

THE GAME CONSERVATION 

SOCIETY 

150 Nassau St., New York 



GOLDEN, SILVER, AMHERST, 
REEVES and RINGNECK 
PHEASANTS. 
All pure bred, strong healthy birds. 
Must be seen to be appreciated. 
Prices reasonable. Eggsin season. 

THOS. F. CHESEBROUGH 
Northport, Long Island, N. Y. 



WATER FOWL. 

I can supply nearly all species 
of wild water fowl and eggs at 
attractive prices. Mallards, Pin- 
tails, Teal, Canvasbacks, Red 
Heads, Gadwalls, Widgeons, 
Spoonbills, Canada Geese, Snow 
Geese and other wild ducks and 
geese. Write, stating what you 
want. 

GEORGE J. KLEIN, Naturalist 
Ellinwood, Kansas 




Mallard-Pintail 



PHEASANTS AND 

PHEASANT EGGS. 

Chinese Pheasant Eggs, 

$25 per hundred. Chinese 

Pheasants for Fall delivery. 

Mrs. G. H. ROBBINS, 
Route 2, Hood River, Ore. 




CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 

Announcements inserted under this head in small type for 3 cents per word. 
If displayed in heavy type, 5 cents per word. No advertisement accepted for less 
than 30 cents. Postage stamps accepted in payment. 

GAME BREEDER 



THE 

150 Nassau Street 



New York City 



EGGS FOR HATCHING PHEASANTS-ENGLISH 
Ringneck, $35.00 for 160 eggs. English Ringneck, $3.60 
per clutch. Golden, $55.00 for 160 eggs. Golden, $6.00 
per clutch. Cash with order. Satisfaction guaranteed. 
OCCONEECHEE FARM, Poultry and Game Depart- 
ment, Hillsboro, North Carolina. 8t 

RABBIT AND HARE SOCIETY OF CANADA. 

Breeders should write for constitution and by-laws. 

JOHN E. PEART, Secretary, Hamilton, Ontario. 12t 



LIVE GAME 



RINGNECKED PHEASANTS FOR SALE — E. N. 
McNARY, Martinsville, Illinois. It 

FOR SALE—ENGLISH RINGNECK PHEASANTS, 

field raised, full-winged, from unrelated stock. JOHN 

BUTLER, Easton Game Farm, Danielson, Route 1, Conn. 

2t 

YOUNG GOLDEN AND AMHERST PHEASANTS, 

1918 hatch, ready to breed this Spring. Per pair, golden, 

$10.00; Amherst, $12.00. G. L. DAVIS; Mt. Sinai, 

L. 1 , .M. Y. 2t 

WILD TURKEYS— For prices see display advertisement 
in this issue. W. J. MACKENSEN, Yardley, Bucks 
County, Pa. 

PHEASANTS FOR SALE— RINGNECKS, SILVER, 
Goldens, Mongolians, Formosan, Prince of Wales, Lady 
Amhersts, Reeves, Swinhoes, Melanotus, Versicolor, Man- 
churian Eared. ROBINSON BROS., Aldershot, Ontario, 
Canada. 3t 

PURE BRED WILD WATERFOWL AT FOLLOW 

ing prices : Mallards, $3.75 per pair. Pintails, $3 25 per 
pair. Green Wing Teal, $5.00 per pair. Blue Whig Teal, 
|,3'75 P er pair. Also redheads, Gadwalls, Widgeons, 
Canvasbacks, Spoonbills, at reasonable prices, for propa- 
gating and scientific purposes. GEORGE J. KLEIN. 
Ellinwood, Kansas. 



FOR SALE — RINGNECK PHEASANTS, MALES 
$3.00, hens $4.00. LULU H. CURRY, Roseville, 111. It 

HOYT'S CALIFORNIA PHEASANTRY, PRICE LIST 
FRED D. HOYT, Hayward, California. 



GRAY STAR PHEASANTRY 
Breeder of all kinds of pheasants. Eggs in season. 
Pure brand, strong, healthy birds for sale. GIFFORD 
GRAY, 21 Ward St., Orange, N. J. 



FOR SALE— Pheasants and eggs. Everything in the 
pheasant family. Pamphlet with order free. BUCK- 
WOOD PHEASANTRIES, Dunfield, Warren Co., New 
Jersey. (iotl 

QUAIL, PARTRIDGES, WILD FOWL, DEER AND 
other animals. See display advertisement in this issue. 
WM. J. MACKENSEN, Proprietor Pennsylvania Pheas- 
antry and Game Park. 

CANADA WILD GEESE AND THEIR GOSLINGS- 
A limited number for sale now — the surest way to start 
breeding this species. We are the oldest and largest 
breeders of Canadas in this country. Black and White 
Swans. Wild Duoks, etc , for sale. WHEALTON WATER 
FOWL FARMS. Chincoteague Island. Va. 

FOR SALE — 60 PHEASANTS. GOLDEN, SILVER, 

Lady Amherst, Reeves and English. Mandarin Ducks 

and Black Cochin Bantams. GEORGE H. LINDEMAN, 

1522 Juneway Terrace, Chicago, Illinois. It 

WANTED— WHITE PEAFOWL, EITHER SEX. 
Pied Peafowl, Soemmerring, Cheer, Hoki and German 
Peacock Pheasants. Ruffed Grouse, and White Squirrels. 
Also Sivinhoes; state price and number. R. A. CHILES 
& CO., Mt Sterling. Ky. 

HAND RAISED MALLARD DUCK AND DRAKES 
$1.50 each. JOHN KIERSCHT, Logan, Iowa. 2t 



Pheasants Wanted 



WANTED. ELLIOTT, MIKADO, SATYR, TRAGOPAN 

and Linneated Pheasants. Mature birds only. 

Write A. J. MERLE, Alameda, Cal. gt 



Tn writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters : "Yours for More Game/ 



128 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Notice to Purchasers. 

Purchasers can rely upon advertisers in The Game Breeder. The Game Conservation 
Society has a committee known as the Game Guild, which investigates complaints promptly 
and insists upon fair dealing under a penalty of dismissal from membership and the loss of the 
right to advertise in the magazine. There are very few complaints in a year, for the most 
part due to shipments of eggs. These have been uniformly adjusted to the satisfaction of the 
seller and purchaser. Any member making a complaint should state that in placing his order 
he mentioned the fact that it was due to an advertisement in The Game Breeder. All mem- 
bers of the Society are urged to buy from those who support the publication by advertising 
in it. 



PURE BRED RINGNECK AND GOLDEN PHEAS, 

ant eggs. Also bantam e&es from smooth legged, gentle- 
motherly stock. A. P. SLOCUMB, 4110 Penhurst Ave., 
Baltimore, Md. It 

FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE— FOR FANCY DUCKS, 
geese or pheasants. 15 pair cf 1918 hatch Muscovey 
ducks. 15 pair 1918 pit games. Grey's, Spangles, and 
Black Breasted Reds. Genuine pit birds. Ducks $8.00 
per pair, $10.00 per trio. ED. J. MEYER, Meyer Lake 
Stock Farm, Canton. Ohio. 2t 

WILD TURKEYS FOR SALE. LARGE, HARDY 

specimens. Satisfaction guaranteed. LEWIS 

COMPTON, Dias Creek, New Jersey. 2t 

FOR SALE — PURE MONGOLIAN PHEASANTS. 
C. W. SIEGLER, Bangor, Wisconsin. at 

FOR SALE—SEVERAL MATED PAIRS OF PURE 

bred black ducks, $5.00 per pair. Domesticated as pets 
but from wild eggs. ARROWHEAD, Milton, Vl. 2t 



THE BLACK SIBERIAN HARE IS OF ENORMOUS 
size. It grows faster, matures and breeds earlier than 
any other rabbit, but best of all is its delicious meat and 
beautiful fur. Write for information and prices. 
SIBERIAN FUR FARM, Hamilton, Canada. 6t 

GLENWOOD PHEASANTRIES, HADLYME, CONN. 

Ringneck phaesant eggs for sale. Price $25.00 per 100. 

R. K. McPHAIL. 4 t 



FOODS 



WILD DUCK FOODS 

Wild duck food plants, and seed. Wild Celery, Sago 
Pond Weed, Widgeon grass, Red head grass, Chara 
and other kinds. 

There are hundreds of thousands of acres of water 
marshes where these, the best of duck foods, will grow 
and hold the game. Write and learn how to do it. 
WHITE'S GAME PRESERVE, Waterlily, N. C. 
Currituck Sound. 



DO YOU BUY MEXICAN QUAIL AND THEN LET 
them die, because of change of diet from green food and 
insect life in abundance, to dry grain ? Let the change OJ 
diet be gradual, using Meal Worms as a substituie for 
insect life. 500 at $1.00 ; 1000 at $1.50; 5000 at $5.00, all 
express prepaid. See November 1918 Game Breeder, page 
42, last paragraph. C. R. KERN, Mount Joy, Penna. It 



GAMEKEEPERS 

GAMEKEEPER, HEAD, WISHES SITUATION. 
Thoroughly experienced, rearing pheasants and wild 
ducks. Also the trapping of vermin, care and manage- 
ment of dogs, deer, decoys, boats, etc. Apply to W., care 
of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau Street, N. Y. City. It 

HEAD GAMEKEEPER'S SON SEEKS SITUATION 

as gamekeeper. 11 years experience and 11 years good 

references. Understands all duties. Age 25 years. Apply 

DAVID GORDON, Hadlyme, Conn. It 



WANTED — POSITION AS MANAGER ON GAME 
farm or shooting preserve. Long experience raising 
game birds. Understand raising and training shooting 
dogs, and trapping vermin. A S. B., care of Game 
Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York, N. Y. 

WANTED. SITUATION AS GAMEKEEPER. Ex- 
perienced on game rearing and dog training. Married. 
Apply H. care of THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau 
St., New York. 

GAMEKEEPER DESIRES SITUATION. THOR- 

oughly understands all duties, etc. Best references 

from Europe and this country. M. J. F., care of The 

Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York City. 4t 

WANTED SITUATION— A GAMEKEEPER FAMIL- 
iar with pheasant and poultry rearing. I have also had 
experience in general farming and can plan the planting 
for game. BRUCE LANE, care of Game Breeder, 150 
Nassau St., New York. 6t 

GAMEKEEPER WANTS A POSITION FOR THE 
coming season on a game farm, club or estate. English, 
age 26, single, no draft, experience in rearing all birds of 
game and poultry, care of dogs and fish, trapping of 
vermin. Good references from England and this country. 
WILFRED BUTLER, Easton Game Farm, Danielson, 
Conn. 2t 



MISCELLANEOUS 

FOR SALE— GAME FARM. TWO HUNDRED AND 
fifty acres. Twenty-eight deer. Fine new log bungalow. 
Fine hunting. A beauiilul home. Price $60.00 per 
acre. Owner G. D. GORNS, Purdue, Douglas Co., 
Oreeon. 2t 

RINGNECK PHEASANTS, $5.00 A PAIR. GOLDENS, 
$10.00 a pair. Guaranteed strong and in the pink of con- 
dition for Spring breeding. Order now as I have a limited 
supply of birds. LILLIAN E. GALLUP, 2209 Ogden, 
Omaha, Nebraska. it 

BREEDING STOCK OF PHEASANTS FOR SALE 
— Ringnecks, Silver, Goldens, Mongolians, Formosan, 
Prince of Wales, Lady Amhersts, Reeves, Swinhoes, 
Melanotus, Japanese Versicolors, Manchurian Eared 
ROBINSON BROS., Aldershot, Ont., Can. 

"THE RANCH BRED FOX," THE BEST BOOK 

published on Fox farming. Tells all aboutf his wonderful 
industry. Price 25c. postpaid. THE BLACK FOX 
MAGAZINE, 15 Whitehall St., New York. 

SAFETY RAZOR BLADES. SAFETY RAZOR 
blades, 10 cents each or $1.00 per dozen. When ordering 
kindly mention the make of your razor. E. DAYTON, 
150 Nassau Street, New York City. 

WANTED, A SMALL COUNTRY PLACE ON LONG 
Island with a house of six or eight rooms and land suit- 
able for farming. State acreage, location, price and 
terms. B. J., care Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. 

WANTED TO RENT, WITH PRIVILEGE OF 
purchase, Long Island farm with good buildings. Place 
must have a small pond or stream suitable for ducks. 
GAME PRESERVE, care Editor Game Breeder, 150 
Nassau Street, New York. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sigrn your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



Quail, Bobwhites and Other Species 

NOW IS THE TIME TO BUY QUAIL FROM 

Mackensen Game Park 

I carry the largest stock in America of live 
game birds, ornamental birds and quadrupeds. 

Also Pheasant Eggs by the 1 00 & 1 000 

I am prepared to fill the largest orders for Pheasants 
and Eggs, and for years I have filled practically all of 
the large State orders for both Partridges and Pheasants. 

All Pheasant Eggs Arc from My Own Pens 

Pheasants 

My Pheasant pens hold thousands of 
Pheasants and I am prepared to furnish 
these birds in large numbers to State de- 
partments, individual breeders and preserves. 

Wild Duck 

Mallards, Black Duck, Teal, Wood Duck. Pintails and other species 

can be supplied in large numbers at at 
tractive prices. Also Mandarins and 
other water fowl. 






all 



Now is the Time to Buy Wild Turkey Eggs 

AND 

Wild Turkeys 

I am now the largest breeder and 
dealer in Wild Turkeys and can supply 
these birds in good numbers to State 
Departments and preserve owners 

I carry the largest stock in America of ornamental birds and animals. My ponds now contain nearly 200 beet 
Royal Swans of England I nave fine lot of the beautiful pink FLAMINGOES and the very large European 
PELICANS. Also STORKS, CRANES, PEAFOWL, fancy GEESE and DUCKS. My pheasant pens contain over 
a thousand Ringneck and fancy PHEASANTS. All stock is kept under practically natural conditions. I have B0 acre* 
of land entirely devoted to my business. Can also promptly furnish BUFFALOES, DEER. LLAMAS. RABBITS, etc 

Orders booked during summer. 

I have for years filled practically all the large State Orders and have better 
facilities for handling large orders than any other firm. 

Write me before buying elsewhere — it will pay you to do so. Your visit solicited. 
I am only fifl miles from New York and 30 miles from Philadeloaia. 

WM. J. MACKENSEN 

YARDLEY. BUCKS COUNTY, PA. 

Member of The Game Guild 



Department V. 



IDEAL 
PREMIER 



The 
Powder 
You 

■ S hoot 



QjmfagtonA 



SELBY LOADS 

SUPERIOR GRADE 



0' i BLACK SHELLS 



PI ELD 



Winchester \ 

LEADER 



WHEN you go to the traps or into the game 
covers for a day's sport you use the shell 
which experience has taught you is best 
adapted to your needs. To get the best results 
you stick to your favorite shell just as you do to 
your favorite gun. 

You should be just as careful about the ponvder that this 
shell contains. 

That the powder plays an important part in your shooting- 
is obvious. In this connection you can't do better than 
select and stick to 

HERCULES 

Smokeless Shotgun 

POWDERS 

INFALLIBLE "£.C" 

The next time that you buy shells look on the top wad for 
the name Infallible or "E. C." as well as on the base for 
the name of the shell. You should have no difficulty in get- 
ting shells loaded with either one of these powders for they 
are found in any one of the fourteen standard shells listed here. 

Hercules Smokeless Shotgun Powders can be relied upon to jive yon the same 
service aiall times. Their qualities are not affected by time or weather conditions 
and they will always give high velocity, light recoil "and even patterns. 

HERCULES POWDER^ CO. 

51 West 10th Street 

Wilmington Delaware 



N1TRO CLUB 



SELBY LOADS 

CHALLENGE GRADE 



(jg ft BLACK SHELLS 1 



RECORD 



Winchester \ 

REPEATER 



\j -f,w \y i 




iiii'iiiiiiiininn 



Single Copies 10 



t 




sjyra**C 



THE* 




Q AH E DfiE 




FEBRUARY 1919 



THE OBJECT OF THIS HAGAZINE IS 

to Make- North Ameeicathe brGGEST 
iGahe Producing Country jn the World 




No. 5 





AS A CHANGE, TRY 

SPRATT'S 

WAR RODNIM No. 1 

A granulated dog food of great value containing a 
large percentage of meat 




Spratt's Foods Are Worth Fighing For 



AS A STAPLE DIET, WE RECOMMEND 

SPRATT'S 

WAR RODNIM No. 2 

A granulated food which is daily becoming 
popular amongst dog owners. 



Write for Samples and Send 2c stamp for "Dog Culture" 



SPRATT'S PATENT LIMITED 

NEWARK, NEW JERSEY 

San Francisco St. Louis Cleveland Montreal 

Factory also in London, England 



THE GAME BREEDER 



i2«J 




buy 
load 



The Big 

Fourteen 



THESE are the fourteen standard brands 
of loaded shells and the shell you shoot is 
among them. 

Remember — you can always get your favorite 

shell loaded with Infallible or"E.C." if you 

ask for it and insist on getting it. You can 

any one of the fourteen shells listed at the 

:d with one of the 

HERCULES 

Smokeless Shotgun 




right 



POWDERS 



INFALLIBLE 



z.cr 



When you swing your gun to your shoulder and pull the 
trigger — Ws the poivder that does the work. And it is of the 
utmost importance to you that this powder be dependable. 

Hercules Smokeless Shotgun Powders are always depend- 
able. They always burn evenly, give even patterns, high 
velocity and light recoil. 

The next time that you buy shells, look on the top wad 
for the name Infallible or "E. C." 



HERCULES POWDER CO. 




Wilmington 



51 W. 10th Street 

Delaware 




R3 n %t tori 



ARROW 
NITRO CLUB 



SELBY LOADS 
CHALLENGE GRADE 
SUPERIOR GRADE 



(g) \BLACK SHELLS 

^"^ AJAX 

CLIMAX 

FIELD 
RECORD 

Winchester. 

REPEATER 
LEADER 



130 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Let Your Trap Gun Purchase Be a PARKER. 

Be One of the Thousands of Satisfied PARKER Gun Users. 




PARKER Guns are made by gun experts. The purchaser 
of a PARKER Gun receives in good substantial gun value, the 
benefits of experience in gun manufacturing of over 50 years. 

Once you have used the PARKER, you will never be 
satisfied with anything but the BEST. 

Eventually you will shoot the PARKER. Why not now ? 

Send for catalog and free booklet about 20 bore guns. 

PARKER BROS., Master Gun Makers, MERIDEN, CONN., U. S. A. 

NEW YORK SALESROOMS, 25 MURRAY STREET. 



MARMOT PHEASANTRY 



Ringnecks Chinese Reeves Golden 

Silver Amherst Japanese Silky Fowl 

Book your order for egg's now. Eggs in any quantity from the 
Japanese Silky — Rhode Island Red Cross. The perfect mother 
tor large breeders of Pheasants. 

We have one of the largest exclusive Game Breeding Farms in the U. S., and we 
warrant every bird we ship to be in prime condition for breeding or show purposes. 

We are now contracting full wing Ringnecks in any quantity up to 5,000 for 
August and early fall delivery. 

If you want some splendid Chinese-Mongolian cocks for new blood in your pens, 
and are willing to pay $} each for them, send us a check. Hens $4- 50. 
Expensive, but they're worth it. Member of the Game Guild 



MARMOT PHEASANTRY, 



MARMOT, OREGON 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



131 




No. 2, 

American 

Marksmen Series, 

Painted for 

Remington UMC 

by F, X. Leyendecker 



Rifle Snooting and Education 

AN education -without a course m snooting' is not complete — it is like citizenship 
without a vote. More than ever before our high schools, preparatory schools 
anal colleges are recognizing this. Ana here again Reming'ton UMC free service 
can he ana is consulted and used to advantage. 

What or the high school or college in your community — has it a live N. R. A. rifle club ? 
Our Service Department will furnish the right information — how to revive or start such a 
club, how to obtain National Rifle Association recognition and free Government equipment. 
It will supply the right instruction books and targets, free or charge. 

With the right start, -we believe appreciation of the right equipment and adoption of 
Remington UMC will follow naturally, as has been the case so many thousands of times. 

• * 

School Principals, head masters, faculty heads, rifle coaches and secretaries of secondary school and college rifle clubs — Write at once for 
a free copy of the Remington .R^At-from-the-Start Handbook for rifle club officials and blank registration card for free target service. 

THE REMINGTON ARMS UNION METALLIC CARTRIDGE CO., Inc. 

Largest JVlanufacturers of Firearms and Ammunition in the \PorJd 
WOOLWORTH BUILDING, NEW YORK 



132 THE GAME BREEDER 



CONTENTS 



Survey of the Field — Game Breeders Good Advice The Migratory Bird 

Treaty Law — The Present Law — The Supreme Court Case— The New 

Law — Other Cases — Court Decisions Imported Birds "Only the Rich" 

— Quail Importations. 

Hunting Trips of a Ranchman - Theodore Roosevelt 

Shooting Foxes on Long Island - H. J. Montanus 

What Grouse Owners Should Do ■ - - D. W. Huntington 

Notes from the Game Farms and Preserves - By Our Readers 

Pole Traps — Ground Traps — Prizes — Incubators — Fields Attractive 

to Game — Sportsmen and Farmers Law to Encourage Game Breeding 

— Duck Eggs and Owls Crow Prizes Opinion of Mr. Carney— The 

Wild Pigeon — Ten Commandments Game Law Novelties — Ex- 
periments with Incubators— Fountain for Roosevelt. 
Editorials — Harmony — Roosevelt — Legal Mistakes. 
Correspondence, Trade Notes, Etc. 



WILD DUCKS AND WILD GEESE 



It Is Now Legal to Trap Wild 
Fowl for Breeding Purposes 

™ ■ ■'■■■ ' ■ ■ i .i i i «i 

Write to The Biological Survey, Washington, D. C, for information about Trapping Permits 

The book, OUR WILD FOWL AND WADERS, written by the 
Editor of The Game Breeder, contains full information about the 
trapping of wild fowl and how to rear the birds for profit and 
for sport. There are chapters on How to Form Shooting Clubs ; 
How to Control the Enemies of Wild Fowl, etc. Fully illustrated 
with pictures of ducks on preserves, etc. 

PRICE, #2.00 POSTPAID 

THE GAME BREEDER, 1 50 Nassau St., NEW YORK 



T he Game Breeder 



VOLUME XIV 



FEBRUARY, 1919 



NUMBER 5 



SURVEY OF THE FIELD. 



Game Breeders 

The Game Breeder is the only means 
of communication between game farmers 
and their shooting customers, the game 
shooting clubs and the owners of farms 
and country places which have game for 
shooting. There are numerous publica- 
tions which encourage trap shooting and 
many which publish stories of shooting 
wild game in Canada and in the States 
where still it is legal to shoot some spe- 
cies of game, but The Game Breeder is 
the trade paper which reaches all of the 
game producers in America and their 
customers who wish to purchase game 
for propagation and for shooting. 

In some states we now have hundreds 
of game breeders. In all of the states 
and in the provinces of Canada we have 
some and the number is increasing rap- 
idly everywhere. It is for this reason 
that advertisements in The Game Breed- 
er produce the splendid results which 
advertisers continually say they do in 
letters to the magazine. 

Good Advice 

We receive a big mail and the tele- 
phone rings often, requesting us to tell 
the applicants where they can purchase 
game. In all cases the answer is, "From 
our advertisers." It would not be fair 
for us to recommend one advertiser or 
another. 

One use of the magazine seems often 
to be overlooked. It is the right place 
to insert advertisements of game want- 
ed. If our readers find that the adver- 
tisers can not furnish just what they 
want they should send advertisements, 
stating that they wish to purchase game 
and eggs and asking readers to quote 
prices. The game breeders are now 



standing well together and many send 
subscriptions for others when renewing 
their own subscription. All game breed- 
ers who believe that their industry should 
be protected and not prevented should 
deal with those who advertise, not only 
when buying game but also when pur- 
chasing appliances, ammunition, etc. 

The Migratory Bird Treaty Law 

There seems to be a wide misunder- 
standing about the migratory bird treaty 
law. This arises from there being two 
laws on the subject of migratory birds. 
The first one, which was enacted before 
the treaty was made, was declared un- 
constitutional by three United States 
District Courts in Arkansas, Kansas and 
Maine. The question of the constitu- 
tionality of the law was argued before 
the United States Supreme Court which 
was asked to reverse the Circuit Court 
decisions. After some delay the court 
asked to have the case re-argued, which 
seemed to us to indicate that it was not 
prepared to reverse the lower courts. 

Those interested in the law evidently 
decided that they were advocating a bad 
law and they decided to procure a treaty 
with Canada and to ask for a new act 
of Congress based on the treaty. 

The Present Law 

The new act, as our readers will re- 
member, was preventive and not per- 
missive, and we opposed its enactment, 
insisting that it should distinctly say 
that nothing in it should be construed 
to prevent the breeding, shooting and sale 
of game. We do not believe the Con- 
gress ever would have passed the law 
had it not been amended so as to give 



134 



THE GAME BREEDER 



full protection to game breeders. Mem- 
bers of our society in Congress, who read 
The Game Breeder, understood that a 
good food-producing industry was 
threatened and we took good care to see 
that other members of Congress were 
fully informed as to what game breeders 
should have. After section 12 was add- 
ed protecting game breeders the law ap- 
peared to be beneficial and not harmful 
in so far as our readers are concerned 
and if the law is constitutional we be- 
lieve it will prove to be beneficial to 
game breeders. It distinctly says no one 
can interfere with their industry. 

The Supreme Court Case 

After the new law was enacted it was 
not necessary for the Supreme Court to 
decide the case under the old law and this 
was dismissed. The effect of the de- 
cision was to leave the Circuit Court 
judgments unreversed and those arrested 
were, of course, freed from any penalty. 
The decisions, however, have no effect 
on the new law which was not before 
the court. 

The New Law 

The present law is based on a treaty 
procured with Canada and it is claimed 
that although the first law was declared 
unconstitutional by three courts the new 
one will not be, because the constitu- 
tion provides that, "all treaties made or 
which shall be made under the authority 
of the United States shall be the supreme 
law of the land and the judges in every 
state shall be bound thereby, any thing 
in the constitution or laws of any state 
to the contrary notwithstanding." The 
new law, no doubt, will find its way into 
the Supreme Court and one of the ques- 
tions the court will be required to pass 
on is, if a given proposition is uncon- 
stitutional it can be made constitutional 
by an agreement with a foreign coun- 
try. The decision will determine if the 
constitution can or can not be amended, 
and in fact reversed by an agreement 
made between our government and that 
of a foreign country, without consulting 
the states or securing an amendment to 
the constitution by the ratification of 



the states. We have an opinion, as oth- 
ers no doubt have, as to how the court 
will decide the matter, but since the 
game breeders are fully protected in the 
law they, of course, are not interested 
in opposing it as they would have been 
had the amendment protecting them not 
been made before the law was enacted. 

Other Cases 

Readers who are interested in guess- 
ing what the court will decide about the 
new law will be interested in reading 
several decisions which have been ren- 
dered by the Supreme Court. 

Court Decisions 

In Ward vs. Race-Horse, the facts 
were that an Indian named Race-Horse 
shot an elk out of season in violation 
of the law of the state of Wyoming. A 
federal treaty gave the tribe of which 
Race-Horse was a member the right to 
hunt and fish forever on their reserva- 
tion. The court upheld the state game 
law on the ground that. Wyoming had 
become a sovereign state with the right 
of other states to enforce its police pu 
ers in regard to game. 

In Kennedy vs. Becker a New York 
Indian claimed his right under a treaty 
to fish as he pleased in violation of the 
New York law. He was defended by 
the United States Attorney General, but 
the Supreme Court upheld the game law 
of New York. Justice Hughes rendered 
the opinion of the court, holding that the 
power to preserve game and fish within 
its borders is inherent in the sovereignty 
of the state. 

When the California Supreme Court 
decided that the state police powers were 
supreme and upheld a law prohibiting 
Japanese from owning real estate in Cali- 
fornia, Japan claimed treaty rights but 
the president notified her that an at- 
tempt made to have California recon- 
sider the matter had failed and he could 
do no more. Possibly the United States 
may hold that the states only own resi- 
dent game and that birds of passage are 
owned by Canada part of the time and 
by the United States during certain sea- 
sons, when thev come to us. It is some- 



THE GAME BREEDER 



135 



thing of a hardship for breeders to have 
to secure state licenses and to put tags 
on the feet of their ducks and also to 
secure United States licenses and to 
brand one foot but we think it will not 
be long before the courts hold that pro- 
ducers own the food they produce and 
that the regulations requiring them to 
identify their game before they sell it 
must be simple and reasonable. The 
breeders have much to be thankful for 
since it no longer is fashionable to ar- 
rest them for having eggs or breeding 
fowls in their possession and they can 
sell food. 



Imported Birds 

Before the war large numbers of 
pheasants and gray partridges were im- 
ported from Germany, Austria-Hungary 
and England. 

During the war many more thousands 
of pheasants and quail were reared by 
members of the game conservation so- 
ciety in America than the total number 
of pheasants and partridges imported 
during ten years prior to the war. 

Why should we send money abroad 
to purchase foreign game birds when 
we can rear these foreign birds abun- 
dantly and profitably on American game 
farms, and a big lot of American game 
birds for good measure, the last named 
are better birds than any to be found in 
foreign countries. What country has 
game birds equal to our wild turkey, 
ruffed grouse, sharp-tailed grouse, 
prairie grouse and the numerous species 
of quails or partridge? The answer is 
no country has game birds equal in food 
or sporting value to our own. 

Why have our splendid game birds 
vanished ? The answer is : because we 
have prevented by law their profitable 
production. The late dean of American 
sportsmen, Charles Hallock, hit the nail 
squarely on the head when he wrote to 
the editor of The Game Breeder, "Truly 
we need a revolution of thought and a 
revival of common sense." Many intel- 
ligent state game officers have accepted 
this idea and believe that field sports can 
be restored on many American farms 



provided they can induce the sportsmen 
and farmers to- work together amicably 
on the lines laid down by The Game 
Breeder and endorsed by Professor 
Bailey and many other agricultural au- 
thorities. 



"Only the Rich." 

Only very small politicians, usually, 
howl about anything being "only for the 
rich." The truth of the matter is that 
in America the rich have a little the best 
of it when it comes to migrating game. 
In England a wild fowler owns a wild 
duck after he shoots it, but this is not 
true in America. He has decidedly the 
best of the game in the sense of sport as 
well as of food. The poor man in Eng- 
land can sell a few ducks, if necessary, 
to pay for the cost of his ammunition. 
Like the American fishermen and oyster- 
men who sell fish, he can sell a lot of 
ducks if he wishes to support his family 
with the rewards of an out-door sporting 
vocation. The English wild fowler who 
so supports his family is admired by the 
English sportsmen and is encouraged to 
keep up his good work. If he meets with 
an accident we are told that he can get 
assistance from sportsmen and sporting 
associations. In America the poor man 
can go to jail if he sells any food, legally 
procured, to his neighbor, and he is de- 
nounced as a market gunner by the sport- 
ing politician, who also denounces the 
farmer who would sell food produced 
on his farm. The little politician 
shouts continually that the game should 
not be "only for the rich." 

Quoting the Bulletin of the New 
York Protective Association, Alain 
Woods furnishes this : 

Out in San Diego, California, the Union, 
a daily newspaper, is conducting an active 
editorial campaign, seeking to browbeat the 
board of fish and game commissioners into 
permitting wholesale slaughter of wild water- 
fowl, claiming that great damage is being 
done to rice fields. It is argued that such a 
move would be in the interest of the poor 
man, and it is further stated that under the 
present circumstances it is only the rich who 
are able to secure wild duck for their table. 

It is quite true that the poor in the 
older countries can shoot and sell ducks 



136 



THE GAME BREEDER 



and the poor can get them at from 12 
cents up to possibly 40 or 50 cents per 
duck. The poor can shoot and sell not 
only on places which they own or rent 
but also on all public marshes and salt- 
ings. The Protective Bulletin, of course, 
is guided by Mr. Burnham's remarks to 
Congress that in England the shooting 
only is for the rich. But the Congress 
knew better and decided that food pro- 
ducers, rich or poor, should shoot their 
ducks in America and sell them if they 
want to. The attempt to stop the shoot- 
ing by the "otherwise than," or the 
hatchet clause, as it is known, will 
amount to nothing. 

No argument for either side need be 
based on the assertion that it "only is 
for the rich." A little common sense 
tucked into the voluminous game laws 
will settle the matter for all time. If the 
Union wishes to perform a public service 
we would suggest that it give publicity to 
the new United States law which per- 
mits rich and poor on game farms and 
preserves to shoot the ducks they pro- 
duce and to sell them. 

It would be highly proper to permit 
rice growers to shoot wild ducks which 
may cause damage and they should own 
the ducks they shoot and sell them if they 
wish to do so. A little shooting, no 
doubt, would drive most of the ducks 
away. 

We personally know hundreds of places 
where tens of thousands of shells are 
used annually because there is game to 
shoot. We have visited many of these 
places and most if not all of them have 
traps and trap shooting. Now that the 
game laws permit the clubs and preserves 
to make their own bag limits and season 
limits a thousand cartridges are used 
where one or none was used before. We 
have taken the opportunity more than 
once to wander beyond club boundaries 
in order to sample the game found in 
the neighborhood and we are just old 
fashioned enough to enjoy the ramble 
and the shooting on the outside where it 
costs nothing as much as we enjoy the 
shooting on the protected areas. The 
vast bays and public marshes have al- 
ready been improved in the matter of 
shooting by reason of the birds reared 



about private ponds deciding to quit the 
game when the shooting became lively. 
We heard a reader in the South say he 
had no doubt some of the birds came to 
him from preserves, and we were pleased 
to hear him mention several advertisers 
to whom he sent orders. 



Importation of Quail from Northeastern 
Mexico. 

E. W. Nelson, Chief of Bureau of Bio- 
logical Survey. 

Notice Regarding Permits. 
Under authority of law, notice is 
hereby given that, until further order, 
permits issued or which may be issued 
under the "Regulations Governing the 
Importation of Quail into the United 
States from Northeastern Mexico," ap- 
proved and effective Novembei 13, 1916, 
will authorize the entry of such quail 
only between February 15 and April 10, 
inclusive, in each year. 

D. F. Houston, 
Secretary of Agriculture. 
Washington, D. C, January 24, 1918. 

Amendment to the Regulations. 
Effective March 8, 1918, Laredo, Tex., 
is hereby designated as a port of entry 
for quail from Northeastern Mexico, in 
addition to the ports of Eagle Pass, Tex., 
and New York, N. Y., designated by 
regulation 2 of the "Regulations Gov- 
erning the Importation of Quail into the 
United States from Northeastern Mex- 
ico," adopted and approved November 
13, 1916, and issued as Service and Reg- 
ulatory Announcements, Biological Sur- 
vey, 13, on November 20, 1916. 

Quail from Northeastern Mexico will 
be admitted at Laredo, Tex., under and 
in conformity with all the provisions, 
conditions and requirements of the 
aforesaid regulations of November 13, 
1916. 

W. G. McAdoo, 
Secretary of the Treasury. 

D. F. Houston, 
Secretary of Agriculture. 
Washington, D. C, March 8, 1918. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



137 



HUNTING TRIPS OF A RANCHMAN. 

(The following quotations are from the admirable book, "Hunting Trips of a Ranch- 
man," by Theodore Roosevelt. They are good examples of his style when writing about sport.) 



Grouse. 

On this occasion we had a stiff-jointed 
old pointer with a stub tail, and a wild 
young setter pup, tireless and ranging 
very free (a western dog on the prairies 
should cover five times the ground neces- 
sary for an eastern one to get over) but 
very imperfectly trained. 

Half of the secret of success on a 
shooting trip lies in getting up early and 
working all day ; and this at least we had 
learned, for we were off as soon as 
there was light enough by which to drive. 
The ground, of course, was absolutely 
fenceless, houses being many miles apart. 
Through the prairie, with its tall grass, 
in which the sharp-tails lay at night and 
during the day, were scattered gre'at 
grain fields, their feeding grounds in the 
morning and evening. 

Our plan was to drive from one field 
to another, getting out at each and let- 
ting the dogs hunt it over. The birds 
were in small coveys and lay fairly well 
to the dogs, though they rose much far- 
ther off from us in the grain fields than 
they did later in the day when we flushed 
them from the tall grass of the prairie 
(I call it tall grass in contradistinction 
to the short bunch grass of the cattle 
plains to the westward). Old stub-tail, 
though slow, was very staunch and care- 
ful, never flushing a bird, while the pup- 
py, from pure heedlessness, and with the 
best intentions, would sometimes bounce 
into the middle of a covey before he 
knew of their presence. On the other 
hand, he covered twice the ground that 
the pointer did. The actual killing of the 
birds was a good deal like quail shooting 
in the East, except that it was easier, the 
marks being much larger. When we 
came to a field we would beat through it 
a hundred yards apart, the dogs ranging 
in in long diagonals. When either the 
setter or the pointer came to a stand the 
other generally backed him. If the covey 



was near enough both of us, otherwise 
whichever was closest, walked cautiously 
up. The grouse generally flushed before 
we came, up to the dog, rising alto- 
gether, so as to give only a right and 
left. 

When the morning was well advanced 
the grouse left the stubble fields and flew 
into the adjoining prairie. We marked 
down several covies into one spot, where 
the ground was rolling and there were 
here and there a few bushes in the hol- 
lows. Carefully hunting over this, we 
found two or three covies and had ex- 
cellent sport out of each. The sharp- 
tails in these places lay very close and 
we had to walk them up, when they rose 
one at a time, and thus allowed us shot 
after shot, whereas, as already said, ear- 
lier in the day we merely got a quick 
right and left at each covey. At least 
half of the time we were shooting in 
our rubber overcoats, as the weather was 
cloudy and there were frequent flurries 
of rain. 

We rested a couple of hours at noon 
for lunch and the afternoon's sport was 
simply a repetition of the morning's ex- 
cept that we had but one dog to work 
with ; for shortly after mid-day the stub- 
tail pointer, for his sins, encountered a 
skunk, with which he waged prompt and 
valiant battle — thereby rendering him- 
self for the balance of the time wholly 
useless as a servant and highly offensive 
as a companion. 

The setter pup did well, ranging very 
freely, but naturally got tired and care- 
less, flushing his birds half the time ; and 
we had to stop when we still had a good 
hour of daylight left. Nevertheless we 
had in our wagon, when we came in at 
night, a hundred and five grouse, of 
which sixty-two had fallen to my broth- 
er's gun and forty-three to mine. We 
would have done much better with more 
serviceable dogs ; besides I was suffering 



188 



THE GAME BREEDER 



all day long from a most acute colic, 
which was anything but a help to good 
shooting. 

Antelope. 

For some time after leaving the creek 
nothing was seen until, on coming over 
the crest of the next great divide, I came 
in sight of a band of six or eight prong- 
horn about a quarter of a mile off to my 
right hand. There was a slight breeze 
from the southeast, which blew diagon- 
ally across my path towards the ante- 
lopes. The latter after staring at me a 
minute, as I rode slowly on, suddenly 
started at full speed to run directly up 
wind, and therefore in a direction that 
would cut the line of my course less 
than half a mile ahead of where I was. 
Knowing that when antelope begin run- 
ning in a straight line they are very hard 
to turn, and seeing that they would have 
to run a longer distance than my horse 
would to intercept them, I clapped spurs 
into Manitou, and the game old fellow, 
a very fleet runner, stretched himself 
down to the ground and seemed to go 
almost as fast as the quarry. As I ex- 



pected, the latter, when they saw me run- 
ning, merely straightened themselves out 
and went on, possibly even faster than 
before, without changing the line of their 
flight, keeping right up wind. Both 
horse and antelope fairly flew over the 
ground, their courses being at an angle 
that would certainly bring them together. 
Two of the antelope led, by some fifty 
yards or so, the others, who were all 
bunched together. Nearer and nearer 
we came, Manitou in spite of carrying 
myself and the pack behind the saddle, 
gamely holding his own, while the ante- 
lope, with outstretched necks, went a" 
ai; even, regular gait that offered a strong 
contrast to the springing bounds with 
which a deer runs. At last the two lead- 
ing animals crossed the line of my flight 
ahead of me; when I pulled short up, 
leaped from Manitou's back, and blazed 
into the band as they went by not forty 
yards off, aiming well ahead of a fine 
buck who was on the side nearest me. 
An antelope's gait is so even that it of- 
fers a good running mark; and as the 
smoke blew off I saw the buck roll over 
like a rabbit, with both shoulders broken. 



SHOOTING FOXES ON LONG ISLAND. 

By H. J. MONTANUS. 



Mr. A. Wischerth, Howard Voorhies, 
Frank Rausch, James M. Ashton, Hon. 
C. Krabbe and the writer paid a visit 
to Middle Island Club on January 20th 
to celebrate the eighty-second birthday 
of our worthy honorary member, Mr. 
James M. Ashton, of Middle Island, 
Long Island, N. Y., who evidently had 
arranged with Mr. Jonas Coleman of 
Lake Gfove, L. I., to bring some of his 
fox hounds and give the members a 
hunt. 

On Tuesday morning a start was made 
at 7 a. m. ; conditions were excellent 
and in less than fifteen minutes from 
the time the first hound gave tongue Mr. 



Reynard was on his way. Oh, such 
music on a sharp, still and pretty morn- 
ing can only be appreciated by those who 
know ! Well, after chasing this cunning 
cuss for more than an hour, he was 
finally headed off by our young member. 
Mr. Floward Voorhies, who registered 
his first kill, and arrangements were im- 
mediately made to have the pelt tanned 
and incidentally to decorate the cozy 
home in Brooklyn. 

Wednesday was a perfect day and the 
members enjoyed two runs which never 
will be forgotten. The hounds were 
started to the east and west of Bartlett 
Road. Once two foxes were jumped 



I'HE GAME BREEDER 



139 



very nearly at the same time. Well, 
somehow the Reynards crossed about a 
mile or so north and then the trouble 
began. The hounds finally straightened 
out one of the varmints and suspecting 
that Mr. Fox, who had gone west, would 
make a short turn when he found he 
was not being hounded. I retraced my 
steps for about two miles south to the 
vicinity where I thought he had been 
jumped and taking my stand where I had 
a good view of the likely places for him 
to run, in a shorter time than I can write 
it, I espied Reddy pacing through the 
enter of the lots west of my stand. It 
was amusing to watch his antics. He 
would pace a short distance, squat, turn 
his head, start off again, look back (and 
I am certain he was doing a heap of 
thinking) and away again until he 
reached the place where I lost sight of 
him and I had given up hopes of seeing 
him again. He was evidently resting, 
for, to my great surprise, out he came 
in the center of the lot at the end of 
which I was keeping guard, and failing 



to give the proper passward to satisfy 
the safety of the ducks, geese, chickens 
and game, he was doomed to join the 
silent majority with the rest of the game 
enemies. 

This will ever remain a green spot 
in the memories of those who attended 
this hunt. Everyone went home happy, 
aches, pains, colds, insomnia all disap- 
peared. 

I cheerfully recommend Mr. Jonas 
Coleman and his pack of hounds to any 
who are city sick. Take a few days off 
during the open season. Fill your lungs 
with pure, free oxygen, giving new blood 
and energy to the body and know from 
your own experience what it means to 
enjoy a genuine sleep after a good day's 
hunt. 

It is an old English saying that the 
death of one stoat means the life of 
many partridges. Our Middle Island 
Clubmen have learned that the death of 
some foxes, crows and hawks surely 
gives us good quail shooting. 



WHAT GROUSE OWNERS SHOULD DO 

By D. W. Huntington. 

The Grouse would have been exterminated ere this but for the intervention of land owners 
and lessees of shootings. — Rev. H. G. Macpherson. 



The intervention of land owners which 
Dr. Macpherson, an English writer, says 
saved the grouse in Great Britain should 
teach American sportsmen that there is 
a way to save our prairie grouse, sharp- 
tailed grouse, sage grouse and also the 
woodland grouse, the familiar partridge 
of New England and the dusky or blue 
grouse of the western mountains. 

The reason why the grouse were saved 
from extinction in Great Britain is that 
it paid to save them. While they were 
about it in the older country they not 
only saved the grouse but also made them 
tremendously abundant, so plentiful in- 
deed that in some years the birds suf- 



fered from an epidemic which probably 
was due to an overabundance. The land 
owners who intervened to save the 
grouse soon ascertained that the birds 
more than doubled the value of their 
lands and there are stories of Americans 
who went to Scotland to shoot grouse, 
paying more for a few weeks shooting 
than the lands sold for a few years be- 
fore the grouse were preserved by prac- 
tical methods. 

Now that the protective associations 
seem determined to put the ruffed grouse 
on the song bird list where the splendid 
prairie grouse has been for many years 
(in most of the grouse states) it would 



140 



THE GAME BREEDER 



seem wise for American land owners and 
sportsmen to intervene and insist that 
the_ grouse on farms and ranches where 
their owners look after them properly be 
not classed longer as singers but that 
they be placed on the food and sporting 
list so that they can be kept profitably 
plentiful. All that is necessary is for 
the farmers, ranch owners and sports- 
men who wish to save the grouse to in- 
sist on short amendments to the state 
game laws, providing that they shall not 
apply to grouse on farms and ranches 
whose owners may declare their intention 
to make and to keep them profitably plen- 
tiful. No good reason can be assigned 
why a land owner should not produce 
food on his farm if he wishes to do so 
either for sport or for profit, or for both, 
since sport can be made to show a de- 
cided profit as soon as the laws permit 
the land owners to have grouse. How 
absurd it seems to say that it should 
he criminal to profitably produce food on 
a farm or ranch ! 

If some of our readers will undertake 
to write to the governor of their state 
and ask him if he believes it should be 
criminal to produce grouse on the same 
terms that pheasants, sheep, horses, cat- 
tle and various grains and vegetables are 
produced they quickly can ascertain if 
a small politician or a statesman occupies 
the office of governor. A statesman 
quickly will decide that the grouse should 
be saved ; that those willing to produce 
the food profitably should be permitted 
to do so and not arrested on account of 
their industry. When the question of 
game production was squarely put up to 
the Congress of the United States re- 
cently, and the Congressmen had the op- 
portunity of reading the argument in 
The Game Breeder, quickly they decided 
to amend the pending bill so that it says 
"Nothing in the act shall be construed 
to prevent the breeding of wild fowl on 
farms and preserves and the sale of the 
birds in order to increase our food sup- 
ply." 

Any governor or legislator in an agri- 
cultural state who would say that the 
farmers must continue to be threatened 
and even arrested for producing grouse 



profitably on the farms should not make 
much of a showing at a subsequent elec- 
tion. How would the farmers vote 
should a candidate appear on the ticket 
who recently had secured a law making 
it a crime to produce poultry on the 
farm? 

All intelligent sportsmen admit that 
the farmer has the right to post his land 
against grouse shooters and all other 
trespassers ; all sportsmen with any com- 
mon sense know that grouse shooting 
must be prohibited if no one looks after 
the birds. As the matter now stands the 
farms- for the most part are posted 
against shooting, the laws also prohibit 
the shooting of grouse, both the prairie 
grouse and the sharp-tailed grouse — the 
two desirable grouse of the open coun- 
try — and no one ever has any grouse to 
eat. There is room enough in all of the 
big grouse states for all of the sports- 
men who wish to do so to have fine 
grouse shooting every year at very small 
expense beginning August 12th, if the 
Scottish date be adopted, and lasting un- 
til the birds pack late in the fall and 
become too wild to afford good shooting. 
The laws should give the land owner 
the right to preserve his grouse profit- 
ably if he wishes to do so. He should 
have the right to take birds and eggs 
for breeding purposes. He should rent 
the shooting to those who will properly 
look after the birds and keep them plen- 
tiful if he wishes to do so. 

Some of the grouse states, no doubt, 
will adopt this program this year. Our 
readers who own grouse easily can bring 
the matter up in any state and it will be 
a silly crowd that will appear, if any 
does appear, in opposition to the common 
sense which should govern the matter. 
The Game Breeder will give full pub- 
licity to any legislative hearings where 
common sense may be discussed. Many 
readers of The Game Breeder have hun- 
dreds of grouse on their farms and 
ranches; they practically own them but 
as we have pointed out the shipping fa- 
cilities for the food are not as good as 
they should be. No one wishes to take 
a chance of being arrested for shipping 



THE GAME BREEDER 



141 



the food after he has produced it on the 
farm. 

Grouse are the easiest game birds to 
produce in big numbers, inexpensively. 
The Game Breeder will furnish full in- 
formation about the best methods of pro- 
ducing a few thousand dollars worth of 
grouse each season which will be bene- 
ficial and not detrimental to the farm. 
The farmers and ranch owners easily 



can have their laws amended so as to 
make grouse breeding a legal industry. 
All intelligent sportsmen favor the idea 
and The Game Breeder will take the 
field and help in a hearty manner in any 
state where readers may wish to inter- 
vene and save the grouse from extinction 
by making them profitably plentiful. The 
people will enjoy seeing the food abun- 
dant in the markets. 



NOTES FROM THE GAME FARMS AND PRESERVES. 

Readers are requested to write letters for this department. It should be the most interest- 
ing part of the magazine. — Editor. 



Pole Traps. 

Traps for hawks and crows should be 
placed on high poles in order not to catch 
quail and song birds as they will if 
placed on fence posts. 

The traps should not be set on poles 
near nests of quail or grouse, otherwise 
the trapped hawks will alarm the setting 
bird. 

Ground Traps. 

Ground traps should be used abun- 
dantly to take cats and other ground ver- 
min. A trap baited with fish will prove 
very attractive to cats and skunks. 

The ground traps should be sprung in 
the daytime, otherwise they may catch 
and destroy game birds. 

Old traps not set but simply placed 
near nests are said by game keepers to 
be effective in keeping foxes away from 
nesting birds. 

Prizes. 

A number of prizes of live game will 
be awarded to readers who write the 
best letters, giving their experience in 
game breeding during the year. We 
hope to give some prairie grouse and 
ruffed grouse as prizes and we believe 
we will be able to do so. We certainly 
will if the laws are amended so that we 
can procure the birds. 

Other things being equal our prizes 
will be awarded to breeders whose ar- 
ticles are not written by large adver- 



tisers whose articles are beneficial write- 
ups. We are glad to help the advertis- 
ing in this way but the beginners need 
our encouragement more than the old 
hands do. 

Incubators. 

We especially request our readers to 
write their experience in hatching game 
eggs in incubators. Letters should con- 
tain accurate details of the temperature, 
number of eggs placed in incubator, num- 
ber hatched and the percentage of birds 
reared to maturity. 

Details of feeding the young and the 
methods of rearing with bantams, other 
fowls or game birds, etc., will surely 
interest our readers. 

We would strongly advise breeders 
who hatch grouse and quail eggs in in- 
cubators to transfer the young birds to 
old grouse and quail and to give some 
of them liberty in protected gardens 
When the birds are quite young. 

Experiments on these lines will be 
made on our experimental game farms, 
and we hope to print the experiences o£ 
others who rear game in a similar man- 
ner. 

Articles about the breeding of wood 
duck, teal and other wild fowl besides 
the easy mallards are requested. 

Fields Attractive to Game- 
Often we have pointed out the impor- 
tance of keeping fields attractive to game. 



142 



THE GaME BREEDER 



There should be some cover and some 
food in or at the boundaries of the fields, 
otherwise the game can not live in them. 

The following quotations from the 
book on the English partridge of ''The 
Fur, Feather and Fin Series" indicate 
that game breeders in England appreci- 
ate the .fact that modern farming often 
is not good for the game : 

"The destruction of old-fashioned 
double hedges, the transformation of 
commons and moorlands into highly 
farmed tillage, the conversion of tillage 
into grazing farms, changes in the crops 
we grow, should all be taken into con- 
sideration by any one who essayed to 
show the close relation which the part- 
ridge bears to its native soil. 

"Of course there are careful observers 
up and down the country who declare 
the partridge has fallen upon hard times. 
Thiey complain dolefully enough that 
wire fencing is in the ascendant, and 
that the old-fashioned hedges which gave 
good cover to the birds in the nesting 
time have been grubbed up in many in- 
stances. They point mournfully to the 
general adoption of new-fangled meth- 
ods of farming, and lament the substi- 
tution of the mowing machine for the 
scythe." 

Readers are aware that much of this 
applies equally well to our quail or par- 
tridge, the bob white. Some American 
farms are practically uninhabitable for 
quail because the covers have been de- 
stroyed and no one would expect to find 
quail on hay farms and cattle ranches 
unless some food and cover be planted 
at the sides of the fields or small areas 
be set aside and especially planted for 
the game. 

Sportsmen and Farmers. 

Mr. A. J. Stuart-Wortley, an author- 
ity on shooting in England, well says : 
"Advice can not go much farther than 
to insist again upon the policy, not to 
say necessity, of cultivating harmonious 
relations with those whose business it 
is to extract profit from the soil, who live 
upon it, and who therefore if not al- 
lowed to participate in some of the bene- 
fits derived from a stock of game will be 



apt to view its existence with a more or 
less hostile envy." 

The chief reason why game vanishes 
in America is that it is not to the land 
owner's interest to have any game on 
his farm. Our readers well remember 
the Minnesota farmer, quoted in one of 
the sporting magazines, who told his son 
he would better shoot the flock of prairie 
grouse on the farm since the season soon 
would be open when the dudes from 
town would come out in good numbers 
and kill them. 

Clearly we must make it to the farm- 
er's interest to keep the game plentiful 
and we easily can make proper arrange- 
ments to have shooting on many farms 
when we make it profitable for the 
owners. 

Where a number of guns combine to 
share the expense of keeping the game 
plentiful the cost for each gun should 
not be much and the game shot is well 
worth the cost of producing it and look- 
ing after it properly. 

Form of Law to Encourage Game 
Breeding. 

Sec. 1. Any farmer, ranch owner or 
lessee may apply to the state game de- 
partment (name the department as game 
commission or state game warden as the 
name may be) for a permit to breed 
game within the boundaries of the prop- 
erty owned or leased by the applicant. 
Nothing in the game laws shall be con- 
strued to prevent the breeding of game 
on game farms and preserves and the 
sale of the game under proper regula- 
tions in order to increase our food 
supply. 

The state shall issue permits to ap- 
plicants permitting the breeding of game 
and the taking of game and eggs for 
breeding purposes and may make reg- 
ulations requiring the identification of 
game to be sold as food by marking of 
packages or the branding or tagging of 
the game before it is offered for sale. 

Sec. 2. Live game and game eggs on 
game farms, ranches and preserves may 
be sold by those holding permits at any 
time for propagation purposes. 

Sec. 3. The state game department 



'I I IF. GW1R BRFEDFR 



143 



may issue licenses to dealers in game to 
be sold as food and the charge for sue' 

licenses shall be $ Any dealer who 

sells game excepting game bred on game 
farms and preserves and properly iden- 
tified shall be guilty of a misdemeanor 

and shall be fined in the sum of $ 

for each bird sold in violation of law, 
and upon conviction shall forfeit his 
license to deal in game. 

Duck Eggs and Owls. 

My dear Mr. Huntington: 

Have just read in The Game Breeder 
that I had been awarded a special prize 
for one of my articles. I am very much 
flattered and I assure you I appreciate 
it highly indeed, -so much more so be- 
cause of the fact that I am a great ad- 
mirer of you and your sanity in respect 
to the proper handling of the game ques- 
tion. If I may say so without offense 
my views coincide with just about every- 
thing you say or write. While I most 
sincerely thank you for the good will 
shown me, let me fervently wish for the 
success of your campaign in which I 
should like to enlist as a private. Go to 
it, Mr. Editor. 

Have written to all possible sources of 
supply as you suggested. In view of the 
fact, however, that I have so far been 
unable to secure any eggs at all, may 1 
not further pester you to the extent of 
asking for some Canadian breeder's ad- 
dress who could furnish me with pure- 
bred eggs ? I have over a dozen an- 
swers to my inquiries, each and every 
one of them stating that they are all sold 
out. I thought you might possibly know 
of some Canadian source, hence my re- 
quest. 

Another great horned owl trapped ; 
the third one in four weeks. There 
must have been a great flight of them 
coming south even though the wintei 
-eems to be rather an open one. 

Thanking you for past favors, I re- 
main, 

Yours for more game, 

Z. Ted DeKalmar. 



New breeders are starting weekly and 
they all join us. 



GEORGE SIMPSON. 

Since our last issue went to press the 
sad news came of the death of George 
Simpson, head game keeper for the Long 
Island Game Breeders Association, who 
conducted our experiment with Gambels 
quails last season. Fie came to us from 
one of the preserves on Cape Cod, Mass., 
when his employer went into the serv- 
ice, and he was undoubtedly one of the 
ablest and most skilful game keepers in 
America. 

He was an excellent breeder of pheas- 
ants and wild ducks and trained dogs 
nicely. He was besides much interested 
in experimental work and was exactly 
the right man in the right place. 

There are no better game keepers than 
George Simpson was. He leaves a wift 
and two handsome young children, a boy 
and a girl. 

Crow Prizes. 

The Du Pont Company is offering 
prizes in a crow contest and advises the 
use of crow-calls. A sure way to win 
a prize is to use a decoy owl. The crows 
will come to this nicely and in good num- 
bers, presenting easy marks to the am- 
bushed gunner. Sauter, the taxidermist, 
can furnish the decoy owls and they 
surely will produce the crows. His ad- 
vertisement is in this issue. Members 
of the game breeders association will find 
an owl decoy at the clubhouse and they 
are welcome to all the crows on the pre- 
serve. 

Opinion of Mr. Carney. 

Mr. Peter Carney, who ably conducts 
the National Sports Syndicate, is a most 
capable and fair judge of what should 
be right and proper in the matter of 
game shooting. In a recent letter he 
says: "I agree that game clubs should 
be encouraged just as much as trap 
shooting clubs. My function in life at 
this time is to write trap shooting news 
articles. I know little or nothing of 
game and game shooting clubs, therefore 
I am not in a position to write small ar- 
ticles about this line of work. I have 
asked others who should be interested in 
game bird protection to write something 



144 



THE GAME BREEDER 



from time to time, but they didn't seem 
at all interested. So I have to cop some 
stuff from yours and other outdoor 
books and use them from time to time." 

The Wild Pigeon. 

Mr. M. T. Richardson sends a clip- 
ping from the Sun about the wild pigeon. 
The writer, Arthur F. Rice, believes the 
pigeons must have suffered from some 
disease which exterminated them. 

This idea is untenable since it would 
not seem possible that the pigeons suf- 
fered from disease in zones from east 
to west which was the order of their 
disappearance. 

Cooper in the Pioneers gives a graphic 
account of the countless flocks which 
darkened the sky in central New York. 
Long after the pigeons became scarce 
or extinct in the region they were tre- 
mendously abundant in Ohio and Indi- 
ana. As a boy the writer saw the vast 
flocks which were just as Cooper de- 
scribes them. Later I saw the pigeons 
abundant in Wisconsin where I shot 
many of them. 

We believe the explanation of their 
extermination is that they could not 
stand the excessive shooting, trapping 
and nest robbing which followed them 
westward, in addition to the losses due 
to vermin. The pigeons no doubt re- 
lied on numbers in order to survive their 
enemies. Hawks found them easy marks. 
Their nests were exposed to crows and 
other enemies. When they were deci- 
mated by man their numbers became too 
small to satisfy the needs of their nat- 
ural enemies and they disappeared be- 
cause nature's balance was upset in the 
wrong direction just as the wild turkey 
vanished in Ohio after laws were en- 
acted prohibiting shooting at all times. 
There were not enough birds left to sur- 
vive their enemies. 

The Federal Law. 

United States Department of Agricul- 
ture, Bureau of Biological Survey 
Washington, D. C, January 18, 1919. 
— We certainly do propose to enforce 
the federal law throughout the country, 
and we are glad to have our attention 



called to the fact that ducks are being 
unlawfully hunted on the Illinois River. 
We will at once have the matter inves- 
tigated by our representative in Illinois. 
While the bureau is considerably handi- 
capped because of the limited funds pro- 
vided for the enforcement of the migra- 
tory bird treaty act, it will do every- 
thing possible to deter persons from vio- 
lating the law, and where the evidence 
justifies will commence immediate prose- 
cution in the federal courts. 

Federal open season for waterfowl i 
Illinois closed on December 31st, and it 
is now unlawful to hunt such birds in 
that state. 

E. W. Nelson, 
Chief of Bureau. 

Good Reason for Selling Dogs. 

Numerous advertisements of setters 
and pointers for sale appear in the Amer- 
ican Field the reason for selling being 
stated — quail and grouse shooting are 
prohibited. 

Ten Commandments or More. 

More-gamelawist: "You wouldn't 
call a man a Christian who constantly 
violates every one of the ten command- 
ments, then why should you call a man 
a sportsman who goes afield with gun 
and dog and disregards nearly every 
game law made for the preservation of 
game ?" — American Field. 

More-gameist: But you should re- 
member there are only ten command- 
ments, all directed against wrongdoing, 
while no man living knows how many 
game laws there are, many of which, as 
the Alabama orator was forced to ad- 
mit, create numerous crimes, containing" 
no "moral turpentine" — such as having 
eggs in possession for breeding purposes 
for example. Granting that only 500 
new game laws will be enacted this year 
(a very modest estimate), containing 
only three new crimes each, you must ad- 
mit that it is easier to learn ten com- 
mandments than it is to learn 1,500 new 
ones ; and besides the ten are not changed 
every season. Don't you think it would 
be a good compromise for you to have 
all the laws you want on your farm and 



THE GAME BREEDER 



145 



to let me produce all the game I wish to 
on mine, provided it is used "in order to 
increase our food supply?" 



Game Law Novelties. 

The Sportsman's League of Pennsyl- 
vania has decided that the open season 
for black birds should begin August 1 
instead of September 1. , 

Another resolution provides that the 
Frog Law passed by the last Legislature 
be so amended as to permit the having in 
possession by licensed dealers in and 
sellers of frogs of more than 25 frogs at 
one time ; and also be so amended as to 
permit the use of lights in taking frogs 
at night during the month of July only, 
with a creel limit of 12 per man per day, 
and a season limit of 48 for any indi- 
vidual." 

Other interesting resolutions provide: 

"That red squirrels should be stricken 
from the absolutely protected list to this 
extent, that the owner of any property 
or his authorized agent should be per- 
mitted to kill red squirrels on his own 
land at any time, when he finds them 
doing damage to property, birds or 
game ; 

"Resolved, That before a deer may be 
killed for doing damage the Game Com- 
mission must be notified and the damage 
proven ; 

"Resolved, That bear may be captured 
during the open season in pens (not steel 
traps) providing such pens are con- 
structed in such manner that bear will 
not be injured, and that pens be visited 
by their owner every 24 hours and also 
providing the locaton of each pen be 
given the Game Commission in writing 
before it is used, and that any such pen 
shall be destroyed or closed as soon as 
one bear has been taken therein in any 
open season." 

Since it is proposed to have the ruffed 
grouse on the song bird list for a time 
and a, job lot of quail procured from 
Mexico soon will be exterminated by 
vermin and the guns, it is interesting to 
learn that sportsmen can start in on black 
birds August 1 ; kill red squirrels on their 
own land when they are doing damage, 
take one bear in a pen trap and have 



12 frogs at a time. A sub-committee on 
game legislation was instructed to have 
bills drawn and introduced carrying out 
the above resolutions and numerous 
others, so that the legislature can look 
forward to a long season. 

Since one of our members has been 
able to produce and sell hundreds of 
deer to the State it would seem wise- for 
the State to encourage breeders to pro- 
duce grouse and quail in good numbers 
on game farms and preserves so that the 
State will not be obliged to send money 
to Mexico to purchase birds 

We believe the wild duck industry is 
to be encouraged. We are sure the 
sportsmen will like it. Easily they can 
produce thousands of ducks on ponds 
where there are none. 



Incubators 

The Game Conservation Society at 
its experiment stations has proved that 
the incubator is useful on the game farm 
and preserve. This year the society has 
been especially interested in quail and a 
record, no doubt, was made in success- 
fully hatching both bobwhite eggs and 
the eggs of the Gambel's quail at the 
same time in an incubator. 

Only a few years ago it was thought 
impossible to use the incubator for 
hatching wild duck, pheasant and other 
eggs. Some of the gamekeepers in 
America expressed doubts about the pos- 
sibility of hatching wild ducks in incu- 
bators but a studv of the experiments 
made with incubators in England satis- 
fied the editor of The Game Breeder that 
it could be made very useful on both 
game farms and preserves. 

Wild duck eggs which were purchased 
in England were successfully hatched in 
an electric incubator in a store in New 
York under most unfavorable conditions. 
The store was closed over Sunday and 
they were not looked after and did not 
have sufficient moisture. 

Even the dealers in incubators ex- 
pressed doubts to the editor if it was 
possible to hatch game eggs in the in- 
cubator. Game eggs were comparatively 
scarce at the time and very high priced : 
for this reason it did not seem wise to 



146 



THE GAME BREEDER 



experiment. The Game Conservation 
Society, however, ean afford to 'take 
risks in all its experimental work since 
the failures as well as the successes have 
a commercial value as news for readers 
of The Game Breeder. 

As a result of the experiments made 
by the Society many readers are in- 
duced to try experiments and an increas- 
ing number are beginning to correspond 
with those interested in publishing The 
Game Breeder. 



has are enemies of common sense and 
they know it since we have told them so. 



Work of a Small Ad. 

One of our advertisers in sending a 
subscription for the magazine says : "Al- 
low me to tell you that my little ad in 
your most widely read paper has brought 
me more money than advertisements in 
twelve other papers all put together. It 
certainly flooded me with letters and or- 
ders." 

We are always gratified but not sur- 
prised when advertisers write to us. It 
is pleasing to know that we are doing 
some good in the world. We much pre- 
fer to do good than to denounce wrong- 
doing. It is not surprising that adver- 
tisers get good returns. The Game 
Breeder is read probably by every man, 
woman and child in America who can 
afford to buy a deer or a game bird and 
by all sportsmen who have any game to 
shoot. Most of these people know that 
The Game Breeder is their friend since 
it helped to make it possible for them to 
have game in their possession, and to 
sell it if they wished to. It is not at all 
surprising that these people should heed 
our advice and purchase from our 
friends, the advertisers, in the magazine. 
It is a good time for the game breeders 
to keep in close touch with each other 
and to support the paper which is their 
best friend, and the conservation society 
which will defend them to the best of its 
ability when any of them are arrested 
for "food producing" or attempting to 
engage in this laudable industry. We al- 
ways can furnish wide publicity for 
wrongdoing and whenever we can we 
will furnish the money to defend game 
breeders when they are improperly ar- 
rested. The few enemies the magazine 



Information Wanted. 

The biological survey writes that it 
wishes to procure information concern- 
ing every hunting club or other organ- 
ization whose object is the hunting or 
preserving of game of any kind. It 
wishes the names of officers, location of 
hunting grounds, etc. Our readers who 
apply for licenses can send this informa- 
tion. 



FOUNTAIN FOR ROOSEVELT. 

Lovers of Nature to Erect Magnificent 

Bird Fountain as Memorial to 

Their Great Leader. 

New York, January 27. — Announce- 
ment was made today that the National 
Association of Audubon Societies and its 
affiliated state organizations, bird socie- 
ties and sportsmen's clubs throughout 
the country will at once begin the work 
of providing for the ultimate erection of 
a notahle work of art to be known as the 
Roosevelt Memorial Bird Fountain. 

T. Gilbert Pearson, the secretary of 
the association, who originated the plan, 
stated today that the enthusiastic manner 
in which the idea was being received al- 
most swept him off his feet. "There is 
not the slightest doubt," said Mr. Pear- 
son, "but what the lovers of out-of-door 
life will combine to support this tribute 
to our great fallen leader. Colonel 
Roosevelt Was the most forceful cham- 
pion of wild life conservation the world 
has ever produced. He exposed the 
school of sham nature writers and drove 
them to cover under the stinging appella- 
tion of nature fakers. He encouraged 
by example, by influence and by contri- 
butions the work of scientific natural 
history study. As president he estab- 
lished the principle of the United States 
bird reservations and by executive or- 
der created thirty-eight of these federal 
bird sanctuaries. As a hunter he taught 
the world lessons in straight? clean 
sportsmanship." 

It is understood that the most eminent 



THE GAME BREEDER 



147 



sculptors in America will present plans 
for the memorial bird fountain and that 
when completed it will be not only the 
most unique but one of the handsomest 
works of out-of-door art in the United 
States. Its location will be probably in 
New York or Washington city. A na- 
tional committee of nature lovers and 
sportsmen is rapidly being formed to ad- 
vance the project. Suggestions and ap- 
provals are pouring in to the offices of 
the association, 1,974 Broadway, and a 
formal call for support will be made i. 
a few days. 

* 

Several members of the game conser- 
vation society report that they own sev- 
eral hundred prairie grouse but all say 
the shipping facilities for these birds are 
still very bad. 

One of our members says he owns over 
500 prairie grouse, that his birds easily 
can be trapped and he offers to give us 
some for the experimental farm, pro- 
vided we will procure shipping permits. 
The shipping facilities in this state, "are 
rotten." State game officer reports that 
he is helpless and can not issue any per- 
mits to even take a few birds for breed- 
ing purposes." 

An amendment to the law certainly is 
needed and if the state game officer does 
not advocate this it surely will be evident 
to the farmers and to all intelligent 
sportsmen that a new game officer is 
needed. 



Some Guns for the Gun Room. 

The Remington guns evidently are growing 
in popularity and now that many duck pre- 
serves are being started which afford rapid 
shooting at wild ducks we are quite sure there 
will be an increased demand for rapid shoot- 
ing guns. 



We observed several of these guns recently 
at a wild duck shoot and some good scores 
were made with them. They are an excellent 
gun to have in the gun room so that members 
who shoot at the trap can practice up for the 
fall shooting. Many game keepers keep a 
Remington handy and kill a lot of hawks and 
other vermin with it. 

Some small rifles are also seen at the clubs 
and preserves and at one of these places we 
enjoyed seeing an attractive group of ladies 
shooting at the targets. 

One of our members reports that he uses a 
small rifle effectively on cats and other ground 
vermin. 

It is a good plan to have various kinds of 
guns in the gun room and a good stock of 
suitable ammunition so that parties who go 
out in the summer can have some target shoot- 
ing as well as trap shooting. 



Small Bore Guns. 

Many of our readers enjoy taking trout with 
light rods and even big fish are taken with 
light equipment in the southern and western 
waters. Small bore featherweight shot guns 
are equally interesting. 

For quail shooting, which rapidly will be 
restored in the statees where it is now pro- 
hibited (we are sure this will be done) and 
for upland shooting in the numerous states 
which still encourage field sports and which 
have enacted game breeders laws to perpetuate 
them, the 20 guage guns will be found an at- 
tractive addition to every sportsman's outfit. 
The light weight of the gun is desirable in 
upland shooting and the ease with which the 
little gun can be handled makes it very effec- 
tive when shooting in the brush. Several of 
these guns, made by Parker Brothers, Meriden, 
Connecticut, were used on the preserve of the 
Long Island Game Breeders' Association last 
fall and they attracted much attention. An in- 
teresting little booklet describing these guns 
has been issued and it is filled with instructive 
matter about the relative patterns of large and 
small bore guns ; the sperad of shot in small 
bores ; the desirability of small bores, etc., and 
there is an interesting table of ballistics. This 
little book is well worth reading and it is for 
free distribution. Our readers can procure it 
by writing to the Parker Brothers, Meriden, 
Connecticut. 




A Parker 20 Gauge 



148 



THE GAME BREEDER 



T^ e Game Breeder 



Published Monthly 



Ebited by D WIGHT W. HUNTINGTON 



NEW YORK, FEBRUARY, 1919. 

TERMS: 
10 Cents a Copy — $1.00 a year in Advance. 

Postage free to all subscribers in the United States. 
To All ForeignCountries and Canada, $1.25. 

The Game Conservation Society, Inc. 
publishers, 150 nassau st., new york 

D. W. Hvntjngton, President, 

F. R. Peixotto, Treasurer, 

J. C. Huntington, Secretary. 
E. Dayton, Advertising Manager. 
Telephone, Beekman 3685. 



A western reader says he has over 
one hundred prairie grouse which he has 
been feeding for some years. He also 
reports bad shipping facilities. This 
reader says the birds are useless for 
shooting since the state law prohibits this 
and, of course, he would not let any one 
shoot birds on his farm. He is not op- 
posed to shooting but he says, "the dudes 
from town" soon would exterminate his 
little flock if he permitted shooting. He 
thinks the birds might as well be de- 
stroyed since they "are no good to any- 
body" excepting that his cat eats a few 
young ones and the crows have some 
eggs and "no doubt some young chick- 
ens." 



HARMONY. 

Our first impression when we learned 
that the United States would require that 
all wild ducks intended for sale should 
be branded when young by making a 
V-shaped mark on one foot was that this 
was an extra and unnecesary perform- 
ance in view of the fact- that the states 
require a five-cent tag on one foot of 
every wild duck before the ducks can 
be marketed. 

The game breeding industry is ham- 
pered by state licenses and by the tags 
referred to, and by many other regula- 
tions, and it seemed that the United 
States regulations created additional 



hardships, especially when they provid- 
ed that the ducks only could be taken 
with a hatchet or "otherwise than by 
shooting." 

Since, however, the United States reg- 
ulations permit the taking of birds and 
eggs for breeding purposes and the reg- 
ulations have been amended, as we ad- 
vised, so as to permit wild duck breed- 
ers to shoot and sell their ducks, we 
are inclined to advise our readers to ap- 
ply for the United States permits and to 
brand their young ducks as the regula- 
tions require. 

It soon will become evident that the 
five-cent tags are unnecessary and we 
have no doubt intelligent state game of- 
ficers will recommend that they be abol- 
ished. 

There is a tendency everywhere to 
amend the state laws so as to make them 
conform to the United States law and 
there can be no doubt that in states 
where game breeders are permitted to 
breed wild ducks they soon can sell them 
and ship them without interference, pro- 
vided they have the identification brand 
on one foot. 

We know the United States biological 
survey now believes that it is a good 
plan to make North America the biggest 
game producing country in the world 
and there can be no doubt that the game 
breeders who are increasing in numbers 
rapidly will be encouraged to produce 
game and not prevented from profiting 
by their industry. 

We take far more pleasure in praising 
the right than in denouncing the wrong 
and we see much to praise in the pres- 
ent activity of the biological survey since 
it promptly favored a repeal of the regu- 
lation preventing field sports. Let us all 
pull together for "more game and fewer 
game laws" and the most reasonable reg- 
ulations intended to please those who 
think that the wild game should never 
be eaten by any one excepting gunners. 
Although we still entertain the opinion 
that after anyone takes a wild fowl le- 
gally and within the bag limit he should 
own the duck or goose taken and that 
under proper regulations he should be 
permitted to supply some of the food to 



THE GAME BREEDER 



149 



those who do not shoot with as much 
freedom as gunners do in the older coun- 
tries where there is more freedom than 
there is in America, we are inclined in 
the spirit of harmony to waive our opin- 
ion on this point even if some of the 
twenty-five ducks legally shot in a day 
be wasted. When it becomes evident, 
as it soon will, that America has more 
game than any country in the world we 
have no doubt that arrangements can be 
made so that the people who are said to 
own the wild game can have some of it 
to eat. Meantime the. breeders will con- 
tinue to supply the food and the indus- 
try certainly is profitable. 



ROOSEVELT. 

One of the best known and strongest 
figures of our time, a thoroughly devout 
American, is dead. Soon after leaving 
Harvard Theodore Roosevelt went to 
what was then known as the far west, 
where soon he was active as a ranch- 
man, living and working with his cow- 
boys. At his Elkhorn ranch on the Lit- 
tle Missouri he became an expert rough- 
rider, sharing the hardships of many 
round-ups with his men. There were a 
few straggling bison, or buffalo, on the 
plains and in the bad lands near the 
ranch; the wilder antelope, the black- 
tailed or mule deer and the common Vir- 
ginia deer were fairly plentiful. Sharp- 
tailed grouse and sage cocks were com- 
mon on the grassy plains and on the 
more desert areas where the artemesia 
or wild sage grows. Wild geese and 
ducks came to the river and these birds 
were plentiful on the little ponds and 
marshes, some nested in the locality. 

In his excellent book, "Hunting Trips 
of a Ranchman," the one which natural- 
ly interests us more than any other, 
Roosevelt describes the shooting of all 
of the game mentioned and also his trips 
after elk and bear. The outdoor post- 
graduate course was an excellent prep- 
aration for the strenuous manly life 
which followed. 

About the time that Roosevelt was 
conducting his ranch at the eastern boun- 
daries of the vast plains utilized for cat- 



tle raising the writer made a shooting 
trip with some officers of the army into 
the Sioux country where the bison and 
other big game abounded, starting sev- 
eral hundred miles west of the Elkhorn 
ranch. When the book, "In Brush, 
Sedge and Stubble," in which the wri- 
ter described the game birds shot on 
this trip appeared, a letter promptly 
came from the governor of New York, 
praising the book as "the best thing that 
has been done." The hearty, unsolicited 
praise from the author of "Hunting 
Trips of a Ranchman" was characteris- 
tic of the generous, many-sided Roose- 
velt who had an enthusiastic liking for 
books and writers. 

Roosevelt' preferred the rifle to the 
shotgun. "To my mind," he wrote, 
"there is no comparison between sport 
with the rifle and sport with the shotgun. 
The rifle is the free man's weapon. The 
man who uses it well in the chase shows 
that he can at need use it also in war 
with human foes." But he was "far 
from decrying the shotgun." "It is al- 
ways pleasant," he wrote, "as a change 
from the rifle, and in the eastern states 
it is almost the only firearm which we 
now have a chance to use." He enjoyed 
shooting grouse and other feathered 
game and was not averse to big bags 
when the opportunity offered and the 
game shot could be used as food. 

His liking for field sports was coupled 
with an interest in natural history and 
his stories of the chase are often accom- 
panied with notes abo*ut the habits of 
the game. He attributed his good health 
to his fondness for outdoor life and he 
set a good example for the youth of 
America which should enable them to 
silence those who would decry sport. 

Upon one occasion when we were 
writing an article for a magazine of gen- 
eral circulation a letter came from 
Roosevelt containing a forceful opinion 
which seemed to fit in well with what 
was written and we used a quotation 
from the letter. After the article had 
been mailed to the magazine it occurred 
to us that we were giving publicity to 
a private correspondence without permis- 
sion and we suggested to the editor of 



150 



THE GAME BREEDER 



the magazine that anotner article be sub- 
stituted for the one in hand in order that 
we might get permission before using the 
latter. An answer to our request came 
promptly : we were asked to visit the 
White House to discuss certain phases 
of the subject. Unfortunately there were 
good reasons why we could not possibly 
leave New York at the time. The whole 
subject soon was necessarily laid aside; 
a presidential election was held and 
Roosevelt went off to Africa. 

Partisans who differed in their opin- 
ions with Roosevelt recognized an able 
antagonist but all fair-minded men rec- 
ognized a true and patriotic American 
whose popularity was countrywide. The 
public career of Roosevelt is an open 
book to every one and his good deeds in 
public life have been fully written by 
abler pens than ohrs. Our readers will 
be interested in the quotations from his 
best book on sport printed on another 
page. 

Several memorials are proposed which 
should be erected. One which will at- 
tract our readers has been suggested by 
Professor T. Gilbert Pearson, secretary 
of the Audubon Society, and in propos- 
ing it he refers to the great interest 
which Roosevelt always took in the cre- 
ation of national parks for game and- res- 
ervations for birds. 



LEGAL MISTAKES. 

A mistake has been made in America 
in presuming that all that is necessary 
to produce an abundance of game is an 
abundance of laws providing that for $1 
per year any one can shoot up the farms, 
and providing that no one should kill 
more than 25 or some other number of 
birds in a clay during an open season. 
Such laws, it was believed, when sup- 
plemented by laws prohibiting anyone 
from taking eggs or birds for breeding 
purposes and prohibiting the sale of 
game alive or dead would keep the game 
plentiful and the shooting good. There 
are scientific reasons why this is impos- 
sible. The biggest mistake was made in 
presuming that the farmers would enjoy 
seeing millions of guns shooting state 



game in their fields and woods, often 
killing poultry and farm animals. 
(Juickly most of the farms were posted 
against all gunners. Since too often the 
signs were not heeded, it soon became 
easy to secure laws closing the shooting 
for terms of years or forever, and 
sportsmen who observed that the game 
was vanishing have consented often to 
such laws in the hope that some day 
they may have another interval when 
they can proceed to take a sporting 
chance on the far ends of the posted 
farms. 

The Game Breeder has advanced the 
idea that it would-be far better for all 
hands to encourage the production, the 
shooting and the sale of game on private 
places where the public has no right to 
shoot without permission. 

On all places (and this includes most 
of the American farms) where permis- 
sion is required, the shooting is quite as 
exclusive as it is in places where game 
is produced, and where those who pro- 
duce it shoot enough to send some to 
market. Why prevent production on 
such places ? 

A very big mistake was made when a 
legal system was built on the idea that no 
eggs or birds should be taken for propa- 
gation, or, in other words, that it must be 
legal only to destroy and not to create. An 
equally big mistake was made when the 
laws provided that those who produced 
game by industry could not sell the food 
produced and could not even shoot the 
birds produced in states where closed 
seasons were in force. When closed sea- 
sons are necessary, as we have pointed 
out often, the producers of game should 
be excepted. To say that any producers 
must not eat, sell or shoot for a certain 
season, puts an end, of course, to all 
production for the period, if not for- 
ever. As we have said, the arresting of 
a producer for having stock birds in his 
possession, or for shooting or marketing 
them, is a very poor way to encourage 
production. 

There is absolutely no danger of all 
the land being preserved ; the country's 
too big. There is more danger of 
many places being made gameless, where 
no game can occur by reason of drain- 



THE GAME BREEDER 



151 






ing or agricultural operations or over- 
shooting, than there is of their being too 
many posted farms converted into game 
producing plants under agreeable ar- 
rangements between their owners and 
those who may be willing to produce 
game on them as an additional crop for 

sport or for food. 

•■ 

In America and England 

There are syndicates of sportsmen 
who share the expense of a game keeper 
and there are individuals, by no means 
rich, who produce game for sport and 
for food. There are men and women 
owning small country places, who intro- 
duce and look after their game and sell 
it as food. One of them, Capt. Oates, 
a retired English officer, described in his 
clever little book on wild ducks how he 
provided good shooting for himself and 
his friends at practically no expense, 
since he sold enough ducks to pay the 
cost of production. There are many 
game farmers who make a living selling 
game and eggs for breeding purposes. 

In America there are hundreds of 
thousands of square miles of good shoot- 
ing land where not a single game bird 
is ever shot or eaten legally. There are 
many more hundreds of thousands of 
square miles of posted farms where no 
sportsman is permitted to fire a gun. 
There are thousands of miles of desolate 
fields and woods where not a single game 
bird can be found. The posted area rap- 
idly is increasing. In all cases where the 
sportsmen arrange with the farmers to 
utilize the posted areas and to have an 
abundance of game they harm no one. 
By providing sport for themselves they 
necessarily provide sport for others since 
the abundant game overflows. By shoot- 
ing in places where shooting was pro- 
hibited they leave the shooting on public 
lands and waters for those who prefer 
to shoot on such areas. 

The important matter just now is the 
food question. Admitting that game can 
be made abundant and cheaper than 
poultry by utilizing the lands closed to 
sport, Mr. Burnham says : "We do not 
want that system ; we do not want to 
adopt the sale of game which goes with 
it." Fortunately Congress decided it was 



not what Mr. Burnham wanted but what 
the Game Breeders claim is right. 

Before the Migratory Bill passed (and 
we are inclined to believe that before it 
could get past many intelligent men in 
the Congress ) section 12 fortunately was 
added. Section 12 provides that: "Noth- 
ing in this act shall be construed to pre- 
vent the breeding of migratory game 
birds on farms and preserves and the 
sale of birds so bred under proper regu- 
lations for the purpose of increasing the 
food supply." Some people don't want 
the sale of game : some people do. The 
do's seem to have won. 

The Biological Survey now has a 
chance to make America the biggest wild 
food producing country in the world 
within two years' time. We will help 
much now that the Survey has arranged 
liberal regulations for the procuring of 
breeding stock. It should issue bulle- 
tins inviting attention to the utilization 
of waste swamp lands and ponds on 
many of which not a single wild fowl is 

seen to-day. 

■*- 

A big legal mistake was made, in my 
opinion, when we decided that any one 
who legally takes a game bird does not 
own it. A worse mistake was made in 
some States when we decided .that those 
who produced the game birds by industry 
do not own them. I have observed a 
shocking waste of food due to such an 
interpretation of the laws and big food 
producing plants have been closed, rural 
laborers have been discharged and the 
value of farms and country homes has 
been sadly depreciated by such nonsense 
which never occurred until our game 
was made a political football. 



CORRESPONDENCE. 
Ringnecks the Best. 
The Game Breeder, 

New York City. 

Gentlemen: — Kindly write me if ;•' 
kinds of pheasants of the followin" 
breeds are suitable for eating: English 
ringnecks, golden, Lady Amherst and 
silver. 

New Hampshire. Clinton Lovell. 

(All good but ringnecks are better and 
cheaper. — Editor.) 



152 



THE GAME BREEDER 



A Valuable School. 
The' Game Conservation Society. 

Enclosed please find card signed with 
my address and one dollar for a subscrip- 
tion to The Game Breeder. The Game 
Breeder is a very valuable school to all 
persons interested in the conservation of 
game and hunting. 

I can see the wonderful result gained 
for all hunters and farmers if they will 
carry out the new method of conserva- 
tion of game in America. 

It gives me pleasure to cooperate with 
your society in the good work and after 
the first of the year I will send you a 
list of names of the persons I feel con- 
fident we can interest in the work here. 

A. P. H. 

It is interesting and gratifying to read 
the mail which contains many letters sim- 
ilar to the above. Every sportsman as 
soon as he understands the "more game 
and fewer game laws" movement be- 
comes an enthusiast for it because he 
knows that it will soon put an end to 
''song-bird" nonsense, "otherwise than 
by shooting" nonsense, "closed season" 
nonsense and much other nonsense 
which the late dean of sportsmen had in 
mind when he said: "Truly we need a 
revolution of thought and a revival of 
common sense." 



find same very interesting. Wishing you 
success, I am, 

Ohio. I. A. W. Dean. 



Gray Partridges- 
Editor, Game Breeder: 

May I ask a little information about 
Hungarian partridges ? Are they as easy 
to raise as ringneck pheasants? Are 
they as good a bird for the table as the 
pheasant ? 

California. e. H. Moulton. 

(Partridges are best reared wild in protected 
fields. A few are hand-reared as pheasants 
are by keepers in the older countries. Fully 
as good as pheasants on the table. Some pre- 
fer them. — Editor.) 



Interesting. 

Game Conservation Society : 

Yours at hand. Regards to same en- 
closed find check for $1.00 for year's 
subscription to The Game Breeder. I 



Quail in Mississippi. 

Editor, Game Breeder: 

Will you kindly advise me if quail 
may now be reared and bred in confine- 
ment and if they may be sold and shipped 
out of the state. Is there any demand 
for them ? In other words, do you think 
it would be profitable to take up the 
breeding of quail? 

Can you advise me what kind of traps 
are best for trapping quail and advise 
where they may be obtained? 
. Mississippi. M. G. 

(We are quite sure that quail may now be 
reared and bred in confinement in your state 
and that probably birds so produced may be 
sold and shipped out of the state. We believe 
if you legally acquire stock birds and if by 
your industry you produce this highly desir- 
able food, your courts will hold that laws in- 
tended to protect wild quail which are said to 
be owned by the state because they have no 
other owner, do not apply to quail which you 
have purchased and their eggs and young. 
Otherwise the courts must hold that the legis- 
lature intended to make food production a 
crime in Mississippi. The tendency of the 
courts is in the opposite direction. 

There is a tremendous demand for live quail 
for breeding purposes. The demand is posi- 
tively without limit and the price paid " for 
Mexican quail, $24 to $30 per dozen in large 
lots (by the thousand in fact), indicates that 
quail breeding will be very profitable in your 
state as elsewhere. Quail lay many eggs when 
confined in pens ; provided the eggs are gath- 
ered daily they persist in laying and the eggs 
sell readily at from $4 to $6 per dozen. 

The ordinary figure four trap baited with 
corn is much used to trap quail. Wire traps 
such as are used to take up pheasants and quail 
nets also are used to advantage.) 



"The Biggest Game Producing Coun- 
try in the World." 

Editor Game Breeder: 

I am glad to note the interest you are 
taking in having our State law amended 
so that it will conform with the regu- 
lation under the Migratory Bird Law. 
It sure will be a fine thing, if possible to 
do this, and I see no reason why it can- 



THE GAME BREEDER 



153 



not be done if the State Legislature will 
listen to common sense. 

You are sure doing some mighty fine 
work in having the laws amended so that 
in a very short time there will he no 
question that America will be the big- 
gest game producing country in the 
world. Few people seem to realize that 
in time, not very far distant, that there 
would be no wild game left in the coun- 
try if action was not taken to curb some 
of the. fool laws made by State Legisla- 
tures. 

Yours very truly, 

Jos. W. Turner. 

(America rapidly is becoming a big game 
producing country. • The reports which come 
to this office of places where over 25,000 game 
eggs are sold and the reports of new game 
farms and preserves being started are gratify- 
ing. The Devil himself could not stop the 
movement now. — Editor.) 



Editor of The Game Breeder, 
150 Nassau Street, New York. 

Dear Sir — Will you kindly advise me 
as to where I can purchase for propaga- 
tion purposes 150 to 200 pair quail? 1 



am enclosing self-addressed stamped 
envelope. 

Thanking you for this favor, I am, 

Yours for more game, 

J. E. Lawrence. 
South Carolina. 

(Write to our advertisers and by all 
means have your laws amended so as to 
permit the shipping of quail for breeding 
purposes by breeders who will produce 
thousands of quail. It is absurd to send 
money to Mexico for quail when some 
good quail farms and ranches can pro- 
duce them profitably in the United 
States. The State game departments 
should get all the quail they want from 
American breeders. It is legal to destroy 
quail ground by rearing sheep and cattle. 
It should be legal for a land owner to 
produce a profitable lot of quail if he 
wishes to do so. Your representative 
in the legislature surely can have the law 
amended so that it will not be criminal 
for a farmer to produce any kind of 
plants or animals. A section like section 
12 in the Migratory Bird Law is all that 
is necessary. — Editor.) 




It is now legal to trap Wild Ducks and other 
Waterfowl for Breeding Purposes. 

Our Wild Fowl and Waders. 

A handsomely Illustrated Book, written by the 
Editor of the Game Breeder, tells how to trap 
wild ducks and how to rear the birds, for sport 
or for profit. There are chapters on the forma- 
tion of wild duck club preserves; the enemies 
of wild ducks and how to control them; the 
shooting of ducks, etc. 

Price, $2.00 Postpaid 

The Game Conservation Society, Publishers 
150 Nassau St. New York, N. Y. 



154 



THE GAME BREEDER 




FENCES 

POR GAME PRESERVES 

The accompanying photograph shows one of our Non-Climbable 
" RIOT " fences, erected by us, with our indestructible steel fence post 
8 feet high, surrounding the Yale Bowl Field, New Haven, Conn. 

This fence held in check 80,000 people who attended the Harvard- 
Yale Game, November 25th, 1916, and RO.OOO people who attended the 
Princeton-Yale Game, November 13th, 1915. 

We have this fence and many other excellent designs. It will be 
to your advantage to secure our Catalogue, that shows many of the 
best erected fences in this country; also tells about our posts in 
detail ; how to erect a fence ; how to paint the fence wire to keep it 
from rusting. 

Become acquainted with our fence building system. It will save 
you many dollars and a great deal of worry. 

Fences for every purpose, with either straight or non-climbable post, 
tennis court back stops, etc., erected by our trained men anywhere. 



J. M. 

38 ROOSEVELT AVENUE 



DOWNS 

Suite A JERSEY CITY, N. J. 



RIVER LAWN GAME FARM 

R. H. SIDWAY 
GRAND ISLAND, ERIE CO., N. Y. 

Young Pheasants for Fall delivery 
extra fine, healthy non-related birds. 

My birds are raised for my own shooting and are very strong 

on the wing. 

Member of The Game Guild. Member American Game Breeders Society. 



THE HONEYSWEET 

BLACK RASPBERRY 

Best /or Home and Market 

The bushes make good cover for game. 

Strawberry and Asparagus Plants. 

Price Lists Free. 

A. B. KATKAMIER MACEDON, N. Y. 



Phone, 9286 Farragut FINE FURS 

JOHN MURGATROYD 

Taxidermist 

57 WEST 24th STREET 
Bet. Broadway and 6th Ave. NEW YORK 

Finest Work at Reasonable Prices 
Call and See for Yourself 



FREE EOUNDATION STOCK 

furnished to raise Rabbits, Cavies or 
Pigeons. Send dime for particulars and 
paper. 

Young's Tanning Compound, easily applied to any 
skin, large can $1.00, trial can 50c. Tattoo Ear 
Marker $1.50. Ear Tags 30c per dozen. Gibson's 
wonderful Rabbit Book $1.00. Cavy Book 50c. 
Squab Culture, a recognized authority on raising 
pigeons for profit, $1.00. 

NATIONAL FANCIER & BREEDER 

335 South East Avenue, Oak Park, III. 



The Breeders' and Fanciers' News 

SCRANTON, PA. 

devoted to the breeding and marketing of ducks 
geese, turkeys (including the wild varieties), rab- 
bits, cavies. pigeons, etc. Organ of the American 
Buttercup Club, and Waterfowl Club of America. 
Interesting and instructive articles by able writers. 

SOc a Year. 3 Years for $1.00 
Canada 75c a Year, 3 Years $1.75 

Special Trial Offer in U. S-, 8 Months for 25c 

AD. RATES: 75c an inch, or for 3 months or more 
at rate of 65c an inch. Classified, 2c a word. 

Address 
BREEDERS' AND FANCIERS' NEWS 

1558 Dickson Ave., Scranton. Pa. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letter! : "Your* for More Game. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



155 



OUR FEATHERED GAME 

A manual on American Game 
Birds with shooting illustrations in 
color, and bird portraits of all 
American Game Birds. 

By D. W. HUNTINGTON 

Editor of The Game Breeder 

PRICE $2.00 



Our Big Game 

A manual on the big game of 
North America with pictures of all 
big game animals. 

By D. W. HUNTINGTON 

Editor of the Game Breeder 

PRICE $2.00 



WILD DUCK POODS 

Wild Celery, Sago Pond Weed. Widgeon Grass, Red-Head Grass, Chara and other foods which 
attract water fowl. We have the best duck foods which will attract and hold the game and which 
impart the finest flavor to the flesh. We plan and arrange the plantings suitable to all waters. 

GOOD SHOOTING 

DURING THE OPEN SEASON 

I am prepared to entertain a number of sportsmen who wish to shoot wild geese, Canvasback and 
other wild ducks and quail, snipe, etc. Only small parties can be properly looked after. Appoint- 
ments to try the shooting and learn about the wild duck foods are made by correspondence. 

J. B. WHITE WATERULY, CURRITUCK SOUND, NORTH CAROLINA 

Member of THE GAME GUILD 



Game Wanted 



^ We are in the market to buy game birds and deer 
raised on licensed game preserves. We can use 
quantities of venison, pheasants and mallard duck 
raised on licensed game farms and preserves which can 
be sold in New York State throughout the year but 
coming from points outside of New York State preserves 
must also have the New York State License in order to 
be permitted to ship in this State and be sold here. 

If you have game to sell, let us hear from you. 



House of A. Si I 



414—420 West 14th Street 



NEW YORK CITY 



Cable Address, SILZ, NEW YORK, Telephone, CHELSEA 4900 



In writings to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game.' 



156 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Wild Mallard Ducks 
and Ringneck Pheasants 

WRITE FOR PRICES 



Scarboro Beach Game Farm 



R. E. BULLOCK, Manager 

SCARBORO, - MAINE 

Member of the Game Guild 

We Furnish Eggs in Season 





PROFITS IN FUR FARMING 

Learn about the wonderful Black Fox 
Industry which has proven so profitable 
to breeders. 

Read the Black Fox Magazine, the only 
paper of its kind in the world. 

SAMPLE COPY FREE. 
Subscription $1. SO per year. 

THE BLACK FOX MAGAZINE 

15 Whitehall Street, New York 




Decoy Owls for Crow and Hawk Shooting'] ^ 
Established 1860 Telephone 4569 Spring 

FRED SAUTER 

Leading Taxidermist of America 
42 Bleecker Street New York City 

Corner Lafayette Street Subway Station at the Door 

Specialist in All Branches of Taxidermy 

Write for Illustrated Catalogue 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game" 



THE GAME BREEDER 



157 



■ ■!:. ::■:{■ 






■ 






'" ' f£ 


•, 










f>UR£- 5R-ED W 


LD.'WK 


K K 



We Arc Now 

Booking 

Orders for 

Eggs 

for Spring Delivery from the following vari- 
eties of pheasants : Silver, Golden. Ringneck, 
Lady Amherst, Formosan, White, Mongolian, 
Reeves, Swinhoe, Versicolor. Impeyan, Soem- 
mering, Manchurian Eared, Melanotus, Black- 
throated Golden, Lineated and Prince of Wales. 

Also Wild Turkeys, Japanese Silkies, Long- 
tails, and Mallard Ducks. S. C. Buff Orping- 
ton and R. I. Red fowls. 

We also offer for sale five varieties of 
Peafowl. Also Crane, Swan and Fancy Ducks, 
Doves of several varieties. Deer. Jack 
Rabbits 

Send $1.00 in stamps for Colortype Catalogue 

CHILES & COMPANY 

MT. STERLING KENTUCKY 

Member of The Game Guild 
Member of The American Game Breeders Society 



TOO LATE TO CLASSIFY 

WANTED — ALL KINDS OF PHEASANTS, OLD 

and young. Write me quick. E. V. BILLSTONE, 

Jamestown, New York. It 

PHEASANTS WANTED 
I will buy ringnecked pheasants regardless of sex as 
long as they are strong, healthy birds, large and not 
over two years old. Will purchase small or large num- 
bers for cash. Reference by permission to the Game 
Breeder. ROBT. BOWMAN, care Game Breeder, 
150 Nassau St., New York, N. Y. 

BANTAMS — GOOD GENTLE BIRDS SUITABLE 
for quail and pheasant breeding. JOHN E. DARBY, 
Prop., Maplehurst Poultry Farm, Croswell, Michigan. 

BANTAMS— WIL BERT'S FAMOUS BANTAMS. 
Forty varieties. Shipped on approval. Catalog 3)5. 
F. C. WILBERT, Grand Rapids, Michigan. 

GAMEKEEPER, SITUATION WANTED. PRAC- 
tical and reliable manager and head gamekeeper of 
gentleman's shooting preserve. Handler and trainer of 
high class shooting dogs. Widely experienced here and 
abroad in breeding, rearing and developing puppies; 
skilled shot, expert trapper of vermin. Also a thorough 
expert on rearing game. A capable man to show sport, 
References. J. H. WISE, 214 East 68th St., New York. It 

RUFUS REDS, GAME BIRDS, FURBEARERS 

Our literature of National Show Champions, 
Rufus Reds. How we raise and sell them at pop- 
ular prices, also price list pheasants, game birds 
and fur-bearing animals, FREE on application. 
W. F. KENDRICK, President, The Ameri- 
can Game Association, Denver, Colorado. 



FOR SALE, WELL-BRED SETTERS 

Dogs Trained for. Shooting. 

Young* Dog£s Suitable for Training. 

\WRITB FOR PRICES 

the; rivers lawn kennelsj 

Grand Island Erie Co., New York 

Member of The Game Guild* 



DOGS 



EGGS 



HOUNDS— ALL KINDS. BIG 50 PAGE CATALOGUE 
10*. ROOKWOOD KENNELS, Lesington, Kentucky. 

THE BLUE GRASS FARM KENNELS, of Berry, Ky., 
offer for sale setters and pointers, fox and cat hounds, 
wolf and deer hounds. Coon and opossum hounds, var- 
mint and rabbit hounds, bear and lion hounds, also Aire- 
dale terriers. All dogs shipped on trial, purchaser to 
judye the quality, satisfaction guaranteed or money re- 
funded. Sixty page, highly illustrated, instructive and 
interesting catalogue for ten cents in stamps or coin. 

AIREDALE TERRIERS. The genuine one-man dog. 
Pedigreed, registered pups. Males $25.00. Females, 
$15.00. Guaranteed Satisfactory. L. E. GALLUP, i»oq 
Ogden, Omaha, Nebraska. 



TWO THOUSAND PHEASANT EGGS FOR SALE. 
Pure Chinese, $3.50 per dozen. Ringnecks, Golden, 
Silver and Mallard Duck. S3. 00 per dozen, $20.00 per 
hundred. CLASSIC LAKE WILD FOWL FARM, 
Manzanita, Oregon. ^t 

RINGNECK PHEASANT EGGS FOR SALE. $25.00 

per 100. Golden Pheasant Eggs, 60c. each. Day old 

Pheasants, 60c. each. Booking orders now. Mrs. EDGAR 

TILTON.Suffern, N. Y. $t 

STOCK AND EGGS OF RINGNECKS, LADY 
Amherst, Golden and Silver Pheasants. Wild strain 
Mallards. Japanese Silkies, Buff Cochin Bantams. 
" Ringlet " Barred Plymouth Rock Chickens Peafowl. 
MRS. IVER CHRISTENSON, Jamestown, Kansas 
No. 1. 6t 



In writing- to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



158 



THE GAME BREEDER 




WILD TURKEYS 

Pure Bred Wild Turkeys 

Eggs in Season 

MARY WILKIE 

Beaver Dam, Virginia 

Member of the Game Guild 



PHEASANTS, PIGEONS AND 
EGGS. 

Pheasants, Amherst, Silver, Gold- 
en, Reeves, Mongolian, Swinhoe, 
Versicolor, Ringnecks, Cochin 
Bantams, White King Pigeons. 
Eggs in Season. 

BLUE RIBBON POULTRY AND PHEASANT FARM 

Davenport Neck, Phone 655, New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Member of the Game Guild. 





Mem 



REGISTERED BLACK FOXES, 
TROUT & HARES. 
Rugged pups, bred on highest 
ranch in America. 1917 Breeding 
Record. 8 litters from 8 females. 
Also Mountain Brook Trout. Milch 
Goats. Belgium and Flemish Hares. 

BORESTONE MOUNTAIN 
FOX RANCH 
Onawa - Maine 
ber of the Game Guild. 



PHEASANT 



EGGS AND PHEASANTS 

Pheasant eggs for sale up to 
May 15, $25.00 per hundred. 
110 eggs sent for cash with 
order after May 15, $20 per 
110 eggs. Pheasants for Sep- 
tember and October delivery. 
Write for prices. GEORGE 
BEAL, Levana Game Farm, 
R No. 1, Engiishtown, New 
Jersey. 




LIVE GAME, ELK, DEER, WILD 
Turkeys, Quail, Pheasants, 
Ducks, and all other game. Eggs 
in season. See space advertise- 
ment. 

W. J. MACKENSEN.Yardley, Pa. 
Member of the Game Guild. 



QUAIL 

TWO 

SPECIES 



QUAIL 

Bobwhite Quail, Eighteen Dol- 
lars per dozen. Blue or Scaled 
Quail, FifteenDollars per dozen. 
Twenty years experience in 
handling quail. Safe arrival 
guaranteed. PAN AMERICAN 
BIRD CO., Laredo, Texas. 



DARK MALLARD 
Black Duck, Mallard Hybrids 
These ducks are reared on free range 
especially for shooting and for decoys. 
They are strong on the wing. Big 
egg producers under control 
Price $3.60 per pair ; $1 .75 each 

ALBERT F. HOLMES 
8 Bosworth St., Boston, Mass. 

Member of the Game Guild 



-JffltJ^' 



--^§|fs?£ 





BREEDER OF FANCY PHEASANTS 

Eggs in season. Amhersts, Silver, 
Golden, Versicolor, Mongolian, 
Reeves, Ringnecks, Manchurian, 
Elliott, Swinhoe, Impeyan, Mela- 
notus, Soemmering. 

GRAY'S 
GOLDEN ^r POULTRY FARM 
Gifford Gray, Orange, New Jersey 

Member of the Game Guild. 



DR. FRANK KENT 

Importer Bob White Quail 

San Antonio, Texas. 

Book your orders now for early 

Fall and Spring delivery. 

Bank references. 

Member of the Game Guild. 



SEA CLIFF PHEASANTRY 
We have nearly all. of the rare pheas- 
ants and cranes, also white, Java and 
black shouldered Japanese Peafowl. 
Mandarin ducks. Eggs in Season for 
sale. Write for prices and particu- 
lars. 

BALDWIN PALMER 

Villa Serena, Sea Cliff, Long Island, N. Y. 

Member of the Game Guild. 6t 



PHEASANTS 
ENGLISH, RINGNECKS 

Pearl White Guineas and White 

Cochin Bantams 

Baby Pheasants and Eggs in Season 

THE HIRSCH POULTRYYARDS 

45th Place, Lyons, Illinois 



WILD DUCKS 

The practical rearing of wild ducks 
is fully described in the illustrated 
book, "Our Wild Fowl and Waders, " 
written by the Editor of the Game 
Breeder. Price $2.00 post paid. 

THE GAME CONSERVATION 

SOCIETY, Publishers 

150 Nassau St., New York 






writing to advertiser! please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letteri: "Yourt for More G 



THE GAME BREEDER 



159 





GAME BIRDS 

All American game birds are fully 

described in the illustrated book, 

"Our Feathered Game, " written by 

the Editor of the Game Breeder 

Price $2.00 

For sale by 

THE GAME CONSERVATION 

SOCIETY 

160 Nassau St., New York 



GOLDEN, SILVER, AMHERST, 
REEVES and RINGNECK 
PHEASANTS. 
All pure bred, strong healthy birds. 
Must be seen to be appreciated. 
Prices reasonable. Eggsin season. 

THOS. F. CHESEBROUGH 
Northport, Long Island, N. Y. 



WATER FOWL. 

I can supply nearly all species 
of wild water fowl and eggs at 
attractive prices. Mallards, Pin- 
tails, Teal, Canvasbacks, Red 
Heads, Gadwalls, Widgeons, 
Spoonbills, Canada Geese, Snow 
Geese and other wild ducks and 
geese. Write, stating what you 
want. 

GEORGE J. KLEIN, Naturalist 
Ellinwood, Kansas 




Mallard 



PHEASANTS AND 

PHEASANT EGGS. 

Chinese Pheasant Eggs, 
$25 per hundred. Chinese 
Pheasants for Fall delivery. 

Mrs. G. H. ROBBINS, 
Route 2, Hood River, Ore. 




CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 

Announcements inserted under this head in small type for 3 cents per word. 
If displayed in heavy type, 5 cents per word. No advertisement accepted for less 
than 30 cents. Postage stamps accepted in payment. 



THE GAME 

150 Nassau Street 



BREEDER 

New York City 



EGGS FOR HATCHING -PHEASANTS-ENGLISH 
Ringneck, $35.00 for 160 eggs. English Ringneck, $3.60 
per clutch. Golden, $55.00 for 160 eggs. Golden, $6.00 
per clutch. Cash with order. Satisfaction guaranteed. 
OCCONEECHEE FARM, Poultry and Game Depart- 
ment, Hillsboro, North Carolina. 8t 

RABBIT AND HARE SOCIETY OF CANADA 

Breeders should write for constitution and by-laws. 

JOHN E. PEART, Secretary, Hamilton, Ontario. 12t 



LIVE GAME 

AMHERST, REEVES, SILVER AND MONGOLIAN 
Pheasant eggs $ 5.00 a dozen, two dozen, $9.00. Chinese 
Ringnecks, $3 50 a dozen, $2500 a hundred. Mongolians, 
S35 00 a hundred "Pheasant Farmirg," illustrated, 50c. 
SIMPSON'S PHEASANT FARM, Corvallis, Oregon. 2 t 

FOR SALE—ENGLISH RINGNECK PHEASANTS, 

field raised, full-winged, from unrelated stock. JOHN 

BUTLER Easton Game Farm, Danielson, Route 1, Conn. 

21 

YOUNG GOLDEN AND AMHERST PHEASANTS, 

1918 hatch, ready to breed this Spring. Per pair, goldtn, 

$10.00; Amherst, $12.00. G. L. DAVIS, Mt. Sinai, 

L. I , N. Y. 2t 

WILD TURKEYS— For prices see display advertisement 
in this issue. W. J. MACKENSEN, Yardley, Bucks 
County, Pa. 

PHEASANTS FOR SALE-RINGNECKS, SILVER, 
Goldens, Mongolians, Formosan, Prince of Wales, Lady 
Amhersts, Reeves, Swinhoe?, Melanotus, Versicolor, Man- 
chunan Eared. ROBINSON BROS., Aldershot, Ontario, 
Canada. 3t 

PURE BRED WILD WATERFOWL AT FOLLOW 

ing prices : Mallards, $3.75 per pair. Pintails, $3 25 per 
pair. Green Wing Teal, $5.00 per pair. Blue Wir g Teal, 
$3-75 P er pair. Also reJheads, Gadwalls, Widgeons, 
Canvasbacks, Spoonbills, at reasonable prices, for propa. 
gating and scientific purposes. GEORGE J. KLEIN. 
Ellinwood, Kansas. 



FOR SALE — RINGNECK PHEASANTS, MALES 
$3.00, hens $4.00. LULU H. CURRY, Roseville, 111. 

HOYT'S CALIFORNIA PHEASANTRY, PRICE LIST 
FRED D. HOYT, Hayward, California. 



GRAY STAR PHEASANTRY 

Breeder of all kinds of pheasants. Eggs in season. 
Pure brand, strong, healthy birds for sale. GIFFORD 
GRAY, 21 Ward St., Orange, N. J. 



FOR SALE — Pheasants and eggs. Everything in the 
pheasant family. Pamphlet with order free. BUCK- 
WOOD PHEASANTRIES, Dunfield, Warren Co., New 
Jersey. (iot> 

QUAIL, PARTRIDGES, WILD FOWL, DEER AND 
other animals. See display advertisement in this issue. 
WM. J. MACKENSEN, Proprietor Pennsylvania Pheas- 
antry and Game Park. 

CANADA WILD GEESE AND THEIR GOSLINGS— 
A limited number for sale now — the surest way to start 
breeding this species. We are the oldest and largest 
breeders of Canadas in this country. Black and White 
Swans, Wild Duoks, etc., for sale. WHEALTON WATER 
FOWL FARMS, Chincoteague Island. Va. 

FOR SALE — 60 PHEASANTS. GOLDEN, SILVER, 

Lady Amherst, Reeves and English. Mandarin Ducks 

and Black Cochin Bantams. GEORGE H. LINDEMAN, 

1522 Juneway Terrace, Chicago, Illinois. It 

WANTED— WHITE PEAFOWL, EITHER SEX. 
Pied Peafowl, Soemmerring, Cheer, Hoki and German 
Peacock Pheasants, Ruffed Grouse, and White Squirrels. 
Also Swinhoes; state price and number. R. A. CHILES 
& CO., Mt. Sterling, Ky. 

HAND RAISED MALLARD DUCK AND DRAKES 
$1.50 each. JOHN KIERSCHT, Logan, Iowa. 2t 



Pheasants Wanted 



WANTED. ELLIOTT.MIKADO. SATYR, TRAGOPAN 

and Linneated Pheasants. Mature birds only. 

Write A. J. MERLE, Alameda, Cal. qt 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Your* for More Game." 



160 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Notice to Purchasers. 

Purchasers can rely upon advertisers in The Game Breeder. The Game Conservation 
Society has a committee known as the Game Guild, which investigates complaints promptly 
and insists upon fair dealing under a penalty of dismissal from membership and the loss of the 
right to advertise in the magazine. There are very few complaints in a year, for the most 
part due to shipments of eggs. These have been uniformly adjusted to the satisfaction of the 
seller and purchaser. Any member making a complaint should state that in placing his order 
he mentioned the fact that it was due to an advertisement in The Game Breeder. All mem- 
bers of the Society are urged to buy from those who support the publication by advertising 
in it. 



FIVE VARIETIES OF PHEASANTS. WILD DUCKS. 

•Wild Geese, Brants, Wild Turkeys and other Game, 

List for stamp. G. H. HARRIS, Taj lorville, Illinois. 4 t 

FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE — FOR FANCY DUCKS, 
geese or pheasants. 15 pair of 1918 hatch Muscovey 
ducks. 15 pair 1918 pit games. Grey's, Spangles, and 
Black Breasted Reds. Genuine pit birds. Ducks $8.00 
per pair, $10.00 per trio. ED. J. MEYER, Meyer Lake 
Stock Farm, Canton. Ohio. 2t 

WILD TURKEYS FOR SALE. LARGE, HARDY 

specimens. Satisfaction guaranteed. LEWIS 

COMPTON, Dias Creek, New Jersey. 2t 

FOR SALE — PURE MONGOLIAN PHEASANTS. 
C. W. SIEGLER, Bangor, Wisconsin. 2 t 

FOR SALE-SEVERAL MATED PAIRS OF PURE 

bred black ducks, $5.00 per pair. Domesticated as pets 

but from wild eggs. ARROWHEAD, Milton, Vt. 2t 

THE BLACK SIBERIAN HARE IS OF ENORMOUS 
size. It grows faster, matures and breeds earlier than 
any other rabbit, but best of all is its delicious meat and 
beautiful fur. Write for information and prices. 
SIBERIAN FUR FARM, Hamilton, Canada. 6t 

GLENWOOD PHEASANTRIES, HADLYME, CONN. 

Ringneck phaesant eggs for sale. Price $25.00 per 100. 

R. K. McPHAIL. 4 t 



FOODS 



WILD DUCK FOODS 

Wild duck food plants, and seed. Wild Celery, Sago 
Pond Weed, Widgeon grass, Red head grass, Chara 
and other kinds. 

There are hundreds of thousands of acres of water 
marshes where these, the best of duck foods, will grow 
and hold the game. Write and learn how to do it. 
WHITE'S GAME PRESERVE, Waterlily, N. C. 
Currituck Sound. 



DO YOU BUY MEXICAN QUAIL AND THEN LET 
them die, because of change of diet from green food and 
insect life in abundance, to dry grain ? Let the change oi 
diet be gradual, using Meal Worms as a substitute for 
insect life. 500 at $1.00; 1000 at $1.50; 5000 at $5.00, all 
express prepaid. See November 1918 Game Breeder, page 
42, last paragraph. C. R. KERN, Mount Joy, Penna. It 



GAMEKEEPERS 

GAMEKEEPER, HEAD, WISHES SITUATION. 
Thoroughly experienced, rearing pheasants and wild 
ducks. Also the trapping of vermin, care and manage- 
ment of dogs, deer, decoys, boats, etc. Apply to W., care 
of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau Street, N. Y. City. It 

HEAD GAMEKEEPER'S SON SEEKS SITUATION 

as gamekeeper. 11 years experience and 11 years good 

references. Understands all duties. Age 25 years. Apply 

DAVID GORDON, Hadlyme, Conn. It 



WANTED — POSITION AS MANAGER ON GAME 
farm or shooting preserve. Long experience raising 
game birds. Understand raising and training shooting 
dogs, and trapping vermin. A. S. B., care of Game 
Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York, N. Y. 

WANTED. SITUATION AS GAMEKEEPER. Ex- 
perienced on game rearing and dog training. Married. 
Apply H. care of THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau 
St., New York. 

GAMEKEEPER DESIRES SITUATION, THOR- 

oughly understands all duties, etc. Best references 

from Europe and this country. M. J. F., care of The 

Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York City. 4t 

WANTED SITUATION— A GAMEKEEPER FAMIL- 
iar with pheasant and poultry rearing. I have also had 
experience in general farming and can plan the planting 
for game. BRUCE LANE, care of Game Breeder, 150 
Nassau St., New York. 6t 

WANTED— SITUATION AS. GAMEKEEPER. THOR- 

oughly experienced in rearing Pheasants, Wild Turkeys 

and Wild Ducks. Good references. GAMEKEEPER, 

463 East 57th St., N. Y. C. it 



MISCELLANEOUS 



FOR SALE— GAME FARM. TWO HUNDRED AND 
fifty acres. Twenty-eight deer. Fine new log bungalow. 
Fine hunting. A beautilul home. Price $60.00 per 
acre. Owner G. D. GORNS, Purdue, Douglas Co., 
Oregon. 2t 



RINGNECK PHEASANTS, $5.00 A PAIR. GOLDENS, 
$10.00 a pair. Guaranteed strong and in the pink of con- 
dition for Spring breeding. Order now as I have a limited 
supply of birds. LILLIAN E. GALLUP, 2209 Ogden, 
Omaha, Nebraska. it 

BREEDING STOCK OF PHEASANTS FOR SALE 
— Ringnecks, Silver, Goldens, Mongolians, Formosan, 
Prince of Wales, Lady Amhersts, Reeves, Swinhoes. 
Melanotus, Japanese Versicolors, Manchurian Eared, 
ROBINSON BROS., Aldershot, Ont., Can. 

"THE RANCH BRED FOX," THE BEST BOOK 
published on Fox farming. Tells all about this wonderful 
industry. Price 25c, postpaid. THE BLACK FOX 
MAGAZINE, 15 Whitehall St., New York. 

WANTED-PARTY TO TAKE HALF INTEREST IN 

a well established wild fowl farm. Address "OWNER," 

care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. C. it 

WANTED, A SMALL COUNTRY PLACE ON LONG 
Island with a house of six or eight rooms and land suit- 
able for farming. State acreage, location, price and 
terms. B. J., care Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. 

WANTED TO RENT, WITH PRIVILEGE OF 
purchase, Long Island farm with good buildings. Place 
must have a small pond or stream suitable for ducks. 
GAME PRESERVE, care Editor Game Breeder, 150 
Nassau Street, New York. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 




Quail, Bobwhites and Other Species 

NOW IS THE TIME TO BUY QUAIL FROM 

Mackensen Game Park 

I carry the largest stock in America - of live 
£ame birds, ornamental birds and quadrupeds. 

Also Pheasant Eggs by the 1 00 & 1 000 

I am prepared to fill the largest orders for Pheasants 
and Eggs, and for years I have filled practically all of 
the large State orders for both Partridges and Pheasants. 

All Pheasant Eggs Arc from My Own Pens 

Pheasants 

My Pheasant pens hold thousands of 
Pheasants and I am prepared to furnish 
these birds in large numbers to State de- 
partments, individual breeders and preserves. 

Wild Duck 

Mallards, Black Duck, Teal, Wood Duck. Pintails and other species 

can be supplied in large numbers at at- 
tractive prices. Also Mandarins and all 
other water fowl. 

Now is the Time to Buy Wild Turkey Eggs 

AND 

Wild Turkeys 

I am now the largest breeder and 
dealer in Wild Turkeys and can supply 
these birds in good numbers to State 
Departments and preserve owners. 

I carry the largest stock in America of ornamental birds and animals. My ponds now contain nearly 200 beat 
Royal Swans of England I have tine lot of the beautiful pink FLAMINGOES and the very large Europaae 
PELICANS. Also STORKS. CRANES, PEAFOWL, fancy GEESE and DUCKS. My pheasant pens contain ovei 
a thousand Ringneck and fancy PHEASANTS. All stock is kept under practically natural conditions. I have B0 acre* 
of land entirely devoted to my business. Can also promptly furnish BUFFALOES, DEER. LLAMAS. RABBITS, etc 

Orders booked during summer. 

I have for years filled practically all the large State Orders and have better 
facilities for handling large orders than any other firm. 

Write me before buying elsewhere — it will pay you to do so. Your visit solicited. 

1 am only 60 miles from New York and 30 miies from Philadelohia 




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Department V. 



WM. J. MACKENSEN 

YARDLEY. 



BUCKS COUNTY, PA. 

Member of The Game Guild 




Game Farm or Preserve 



A large tract of land suitable for a game farm or 
preserve is offered for sale at an attractive price. 

The land is near New York on a good Automobile 
Road and contains a large pond and stream. There 
are some trout and the waters can be made to yield 
large numbers of these fish. The land is suitable for 
deer, upland game and wild ducks. I shall be pleased 
to show this property to anyone wishing to start a 
game farm or preserve. 

The place is within fifty miles of the City and can be 
reached by Automobile in an hour and a half. 

For particulars address, 

====== OWNER ============== 



Care Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York 



>l°2 PerYear 



iiiiiiiiiiii.iijiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



SinAle Copies 10 ' 



)llllllllllli:illllliill:llllllllimiill!lll1llllLl!l!lllllli!IIIl 



G AN E BREEDER 



VOL. XIV 



MARCH, 1919 



No. 6 



The- Object op this magazine- is 



to Make Noeth America the 5iggest 
iGAnE Producing Country in the World 



CONTENTS 



Survey of the field—" It Couldn't Be Done"— Notes From South 
Carolina — Game Increase or Decrease— Sane Legislation — The 
University Investigation — A Simple Game Breeders' Law— Oysters, 
Fish and Clams— Advice to Mr. Morrison 

Game Shooting Clubs - - D. W. Huntington 

Cotton-tail Rabbits in Relation to Trees and Farm Crops 

D. E. Lantz 

Elliott Coues 

By Our Readers 



The Massena Quail 

Notes from the Game Farms and Preserves 



Egg Percentages— Contract Rearing— A Good Order — Wild 
Ducks — Duck Eggs — Teal and Other Shoal-water Ducks — 
Foxes and Nests— Fox Hounds on the Preserve — Lures 
and Charms— Increase in Game With Cats Killed— Aviary 
Pheasants — Ringnecks — Number of Pheasant Eggs and 
Chicks — The Kitchen Garden -Traps for Pheasants and 
Ducks — Hawks Fight Over Rabbit. 

Editorials — Farm Game — Trapping Game — Deer and Rabbits 
on the Farm. 



Published Monthly.^ Entered as second-class matter, July q, iyi 5 , at the Post Office, 
Ni w Vctk Ciiy, New Ycik, under the Act of March ?, 1879. 



S* 



w 



M- 



PUBLISHED BV 



THE GAME CONSERVATION 50CIETY. Inc. 

NEW YORK CITY U.Sj* f.BJ>w,j.?S' 



i[i:niiiiiiJiiiin:iiiii;!:iiii!!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii[;iiiiiii!!iiiiiiiiniiiiiinriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii(iiiiiiliNiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iNfliiiiiimii»ii; 



Anyone Can Hatch Pheasant Chicks, but it 
takes Experience to Rear Them Successfully 

DO YOU KNOW THE VALUE OF 

SPRATT'S 

Pheasant Meals Nos. 5 and 1 2 
and Chicgrain 




These foods are used by the leading Game Breeders throughout 
the world and there is nothing on the market that can take their place. 



If your dealer cannot supply you, write to us for prices and further particulars 



Send 2c stamp for "Dog Culture, " 10c for "Poultry Culture 
and 25c for "Pheasant Culture" 



SPRATT'S PATENT LIMITED 

NEWARK, NEW JERSEY 

San Francisco St. Louis Cleveland Montreal 

Factory also in London, England 



THE GAME BREEDER 



161 



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$6. 

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INFALLIBLE 



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28 



Which Do You Use? 

The only question is one of choice; you can buy 
any one of them loaded with Infallible or "E.C." 
Any one of these fourteen standard brands of 
shells is the best to the man who is accustomed 
to use it — when it is loaded with a Hercules 
Smokeless Shotgun Powder. 
Pick your favorite — loaded with Infallible or 
"E. C." — and you will have a combination that 
is hard to equal at the traps or in the field. 

HERCULES 

Smokeless Shotgun 

POWDERS 

INFALLIBLE "E.C" 

are always the same. They always give the 
same even patterns and high velocity with light 
recoil, always burn free and clean and always 
act the same under any weather conditions. 

When you buy your favorite shells be sure that 
they are loaded with a Hercules Smokeless 
Shotgun Powder, Infallible or "E. C." 

HERCULES POWDER CO. 

51 W. 10th Street 
Wilmington Delaware 



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UjM'*£ 



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HIGH GUN 
IDEAL 
PREMIER 
TARGET 



R? m fai tott > 

ARROW 
NITRO CLUB 



SELBY LOADS 

CHALLENGE GRADE 
SUPERIOR GRADE 



(jg ftBLACK 



SHELLS 



AJAX 
CLIMAX 



FIELD 
RECORD 

^Winchester 

REPEATER 
LEADER 



In witing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game.'' 



162 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Let Your Trap Gun Purchase Be a PARKER. 

Be One of the Thousands of Satisfied PARKER Gun Users. 




PARKER Guns are made by gun experts. The purchaser 
of a PARKER Gun receives in good substantial gun value, the 
benefits of experience in gun manufacturing of over 50 years. 

Once you have used the PARKER, you will never be 
satisfied with anything but the BEST. 

Eventually you will shoot the PARKER. Why not now ? 

Send for catalog and free booklet about 20 bore guns. 

PARKER BROS., Master Gun Makers, MERIDEN, CONN., U. S. A. 

NEW YORK SALESROOMS, 25 MURRAY STREET. 




Ringnecks Chinese Reeves Golden 

Silver Amherst Japanese Silky Fowl 

Book your order for eggs now. Eggs in anv quantity from the 
Japanese Silky — Rhode Island Red Cross. The perfect mother 
tor large breeders of Pheasants. 

We have one of the largest exclusive Game Breeding Farms in the U. S., and we 
warrant every bird we ship to be in prime condition for breeding or show purposes. 

We are now contracting: full wing Ringnecks in any quantity up to 5,000 for 
August and early fall delivery. 

If you want some splendid Chinese-Mongolian cocks for new blood in your pens, 
and are willing to pay $3 each for them, send us a check. Hens $4-50. 
Expensive, but they're worth it. Member of the Game Guild 



MARMOT PHEASANTRY, 



MARMOT, OREGON 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game.' 



THE GAME BREEDER 163 



OUR WILD FOWL AND WADERS 

THE NEW YORK TIMES 

"The subject is the development of a new crop -a flesh crop which has especial 
timeliness in view of the general exhaustion of our food supply. Mr. Huntington dis- 
cusses in the most practical manner the restoration of this crop of feathered game, 
and from the standpoint both of the sportsman and the market gunner, wild ducks, 
it seems, can be raised as easily and cheaply as domesticated ducks, and with 
equally excellent financial results. The way to do this is described with estimates 
of cost and citation of experience abroad, where the deficiency of food supply has 
led to the discovery and elaboration of many remedies to which we have not yet 
been forced. Mr. Huntington's book is illustrated with photographs, interesting 
alike to naturalists and breeders." « 

WILLIAM BREWSTER 

'"Our Wild Fowl and Waders' is obviously an able, comprehensive and very 
interesting treatise on a subject which has hitherto received but little attention from 
writers, especially in America, and concerning which naturalists, as well as sports- 
men, will, I am sure, be glad to be thus credibly and pleasingly informed." 

THE LOCKPORT UNION-SUN 

" Mr. Huntington has given to the American people an admirable treatise on the 
practical methods of making these splendid and desirable birds profitably plentiful. 
Ponds, streams and waste lands which do not pay the meagre taxes upon them can 
be utilized and be made to yield both handsome profits and good sport. This 
American authority on wild game tells the farmers and land owners of this country 
how to do it." 

CHARLES HALLOCK 

" The wild fowl book is valuable, clearsighted and scholastic. It is a direct 
appeal to sportsmen of common sense and generous behavior, and they will readily 
absorb its comprehensive pages and act accordingly— and live thereby." 

DR. R. W. SHUFELDT 

" I have enjoyed the creat in my reading of this book from frontispiece to finish 
and I wa<er anybody else will enjoy it. . . . The author has placed every sports- 
man, every naturalist and a great many other citizens of other callings squarely under 
obligations to him. The book is a direct and logical argument setting forth the 
means for the preservation in the future of our wild fowl and waders. . . . The 
illustrations are judiciously selected, interesting and materially add to the value of 
the volume." 

A. A. HILL 

" This is not only a readable book, but it is important in an economic sense, and 
it will especially appeal to all who are interested in the conservation of wild life, and 
especially our game birds." 

AUTOMOBILE DEALER AND REPAIRER 

" If the advice of Dwight W. Huntington, pioneer and apostle of the movement 
in this country for a rational game protection and conservation, be acted upon, the 
time is coming speedily when game will be as cheap as beef or mutton. At present, 
after fifty years of legal protection, we have no game to amount to anything save in 
the more remote sections. . . . The book is not only instructive in an economic 
sense, showing how to make wild duck preserves safe and attractive, how to get 
stock and eggs and the food required, but is delightful reading for all. The author 
of 'Our Wild Fowl and Waders' is doing a great public service in his campaign 
for more game." 

Our Wild Fowl and Waders will be sent to any address in the United States 
or Canada with The Game Breeder for one year upon receipt of $2.00. 

THE GAME CONSERVATION SOCIETY 

150 NASSAU STREET, N. Y. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



164 



THE GAM E BREEDER 



REMINGTON 
UMC 



Reconstruction and 
the Small-bore 

Rifle Club 






No. 3 

American Marksmen Series 
.Painted for Remington UMC 
f by F. X. Leyendecker 



.1 
i 

559 







CIVILIAN America in adopting valuable Government war-time 
methods, has seized upon the modern development or small- bore target 
shooting learned from the British as one or its best rinds. 

In community, industrial and institutional rifle clubs, an enormous expansion bas 
begun, centering around tbe small-bore regulations now officially prescribed by tbe 
National Rifle Association, for sbooters to qualify as Marksman, Sbarpsbooter or Expert. 

Foremost as it bas been in tbe encouragement of tbis sbooting and tbese clubs. 
Remington UMC is best able to belp — as it is helping — to bring tbis splendid sport 
permanently into its own in tbis country. 

If interested in getting up one of these clubs, write for a free copy of the Remington UMC 
Handbook containing full information, including how to obtain Government assistance 
through the N. R. A., and what complimentary Remington UMC targets to ask for. 

The REMINGTON ARMS UNION METALLIC CARTRIDGE CO., Inc. 

Largest Manufacturers of Firearms and Ammunition in the World 
WOOLWORTH BUILDING NEW YORK 



T he Game Breeder 



VOLUME XIV 



MARCH, 1919 



NUMBER 6 



Co} 

SURVEY OF THE FIELD. 



It Couldn't Be Done. 

Referring to the triumph of the "More 
Game and Fewer Game Laws" move- 
ment and the apparent hopelessness of 
the cause a few years ago a reader, com- 
plimenting The Game Breeder on the vic- 
tory, sends a clever newspaper clipping 
headed "It Couldn't Be Done": 

Somebody said it couldn't be done, 

But he, with a chuckle, replied 
That "maybe it couldn't, but he would be one 

Who wouldn't say so till he'd tried." 
So he buckled right in, with the trace of a 
grin 

On his face. If he worried, he hid it. 
He started to sing as he tackled the thing 

That couldn't be done, and he did it. 

Somebody scoffed : "Oh, you'll never do that, 

At least no one ever has done it." 
But he took off his coat and he took off his 
hat, 

And the first thing we knew he'd begun it; 
With the lift of his chin, and a bit of a grin, 

Without any doubting or quibbing ; 
He started to sing as he tackled- the thing 

That couldn't be done, and he did it. 

There are thousands to tell you it cannot be 
done, 

There are thousands to prophesy failure ; 
There are thousands to point out to you, one 
by one, 

The dangers that wait to assail you ; 
But just buckle in with a bit of a grin, 

Then take off your coat and go to it ; 
Just start in to sing as you tackle the thing 

That "cannot be done" and you'll do it. 

When the late dean of sportsmen, 
Charles Hallock, enlisted in the "more 
game" army he expressed his doubts 
about the possibility of winning, point- 
ing out the mountains of politics, preju- 
dice, ignorance and graft which must be 
overcome. 

Shortly before he died the dean wrote 
that the victory evidently had been won 



and he rejoiced, as we do, that it no 
longer is criminal to produce food profit- 
ably in many states and that sport has 
been made free on the places where 
sportsmen look after their game. 

Some people seem inclined to give the 
editor of The Game Breeder the credit 
for the "revival of common sense," but 
it should be remembered that it was Hal- 
lock who used the effective words and 
called for the revival. Many prominent 
men all over America have contributed 
to the success of the movement. The 
late Judge Beaman did much. The strong 
sentences of Merriam, Bailey, Radford, 
the late Admiral Evans, Dr. Field and 
many other intelligent state officers and 
scores of other men of ability who in- 
dorsed the movement and the substantial 
aid of the Audubon association all had 
much to do with the result. The Game 
Breeder may be entitled to some credit 
for suggesting the idea that it might be a 
good plan to have "more game and fewer 
game laws" in America ; it probably is 
entitled to praise for recording the his- 
tory and progress of the movement and 
for advocating it at all times, denounc- 
ing the wrong and praising the right, 
but the victory is largely due to a lot 
of intelligent and able men whose say- 
ings have been published in The Game 
Breeder. The heading to the clipping 
should be amended so as to read "It 
Couldn't Be Done But They Did It." 

Notes from South Carolina. 

A member of the Game Conservation 
Society in Charleston, S. C, sends two 
clippings from the News & Courier. In 
one of these Representative Hon. J. B. 
Morrison, of McClellanville, makes a 
statement in support of his measure, now 



166 



THE GAME BREEDER 



before the legislature, for the abolition minates the vermin in order to make a 
of the state fish and game departments, place for the shooting. 



His chief points are that the departments 
are unduly expensive and also ineffective. 
The editor of the paper says, "We are 
not prepared to dispute the first conten- 
tion. As for the second we are quite 
ready to agree that the game department 
is not yet fully as effective as it might 
be, though in our judgment it has been 
doing much fine work as it is." 

Game Increase or Decrease. 

Representative Morrison informs the 
News & Courier that the game in South 
Carolina is decreasing and not increas- 
ing as the editor thinks it is. It is highly 
probable that Mr. Morrison is right and 
that the newspaper is misinformed about 
the increase of the game. 

If there be any shooting, legal or il- 
legal, or both, in South Carolina, and 
we presume there is considerable of both, 
it is an absolute scientific fact that the 
game must be decreasing and not increas- 
ing provided no one looks after the game 
properly and protects it from its natural 
enemies. Shooting, as often we have 
pointed out, is an additional check to 
increase. The game has its natural en- 
emies, foxes, hawks, crows, snakes and 
many others, which by destroying and 
eating birds and eggs check the increase 
of the partridge or quail, the best game 
in South Carolina, and, as the naturalists 
say, nature's balance is thus preserved. 
The quail can not become overabundant, 
but enough stock birds are left by ver- 
min every year to keep up the normal 
supply of quail. 

If some one should increase the num- 
ber of foxes, crows, hawks and snakes 
to a considerable extent, any one familiar 
with the elementary rules which govern 
nature's balance knows that the addi- 
tional check to increase, would upset the 
balance in the wrong direction and that 
the game must decrease in numbers no 
matter how many game laws be enacted 
or how many game wardens be appointed 
or how many people be arrested. 

It is even more fatal to the game to 
permit thousands of guns to shoot it le- 
gally or illegally provided no one exter- 



Sane Legislation. 

Mr. Morrison no doubt will be inclined 
to handle the question in a statesmanlike 
manner. Undoubtedly he is right in his 
opinion that the department under exist- 
ing laws is not worth the money it col- 
lects and expends. If the scientific re- 
sult of the activity is that the people 
who are said to .own the game never can 
expect to see any of it in the market or 
to be able to have any game to eat ; if 
under the stimulation of those who claim 
there are not enough arrests made, a 
lot of activity results in the apprehension 
of many of those who shoot without a 
license if it be scientifically certain that 
the game must continue to decrease as 
it will so long as there is any additional 
check to increase ( shooting, for exam- 
ple ) and no one produces and protects 
game, Mr. Morrison would seem to be 
right in his idea that the game depart- 
ment might as well be abolished. It is 
a sorry state of affairs to simply produce 
a lot of worthless crimes. 

The University Investigation. 

In 1916 the University of South Caro- 
lina sent out 137 letters asking if the 
game laws had been enforced in their 
sections. Sixteen said yes ; fifty said only 
slightly an'd sixty-five said not enforced 
at all. 

The truth of the matter is that to 
properly execute the game laws there 
should be a game warden on every large 
farm. It is unreasonable to suppose that 
a few wardens in each county can come 
anywhere near stopping the illegal shoot- ■ 
ing or shooting without a license. But 
if the shooting is a fatal check to increase 
and the game must vanish, if all who 
wish to do so destroy game and if there 
be no producers it would seem wise either 
to abolish the department or to make it 
of great economic importance as it easily 
can be made. 

A Simple Game Breeders' Law 

The laws should be amended in South 



THE GAME BREEDER 



167 



Carolina, as they have been in many 
states, so as to encourage the production 
of game on the farms. Such laws have 
produced a lot of game in other States 
and South Carolina should be a big game 
producing state. 

If the game department can supervise 
and regulate the production of game foi 
sport and for food it soon will prove its 
worth to all of the people. 

The agricultural departments encour- 
age the production of plants and animals 
on the farms. The state game depart- 
ments should encourage the profitable 
production of game on game farms. In 
Ohio and some other states the depart- 
ment distributes pheasants and eggs to 
those who will produce the game. In 
South Carolina the quail or partridge 
should be produced in big numbers by 
those who are willing to engage in the 
game breeding industry. 

The law should provide that the state 
department shall issue permits without 
charge to all land owners and lessees 
who wish to produce game ; that those 
who produce game may sell the food un- 
der simple regulations, requiring its iden- 
tification, to dealers licensed and regu- 
lated by the state. Live game and eggs 
for propagation purposes should be free- 
ly sold at any time. 

Since there is a big demand for game, 
alive and dead, and for eggs there can 
be no doubt many land owners will be 
willing to produce the game and it is a 
simple business proposition that game 
will be produced abundantly when il 
pays to produce it and the people know 
how to do it. 

The state wardens should police the 
public waters and parks and wild lands 
where the public shoot and the land own- 
ers who wish to do so should produce 
game abundantly and profitably on lands 
which they own. A state department 
whose activities can be conducted on 
these lines will be of great economic im- 
portance to all of the people. A state 
department designed only to collect as 
many license fees and fines as possible 
and to expend all of the money for sal- 
aries and expenses can not possibly save 
the game and certainly it never will make 



the game an abundant and profitable food 
as it should be for all of the people. 

The University of South Carolina 
quickly will verify our statement that 
where the checks to increase are multi- 
plied (shooting, for example) the game 
must vanish if no one is permitted to 
look after it profitably and properly, 
which means the control of the natural 
enemies in order to make a place for the 
shooting and the proper feeding and care 
of the game which is required to keep 
it plentiful if large quantities are util- 
ized as food. , 

Professor Needham, of Cornell Agri- 
cultural College, has well said the farmer 
should have the right to produce any 
plant or animal on his farm and it seems 
perfectly logical to say that many will 
do so in South Carolina when it is prof- 
itable to breed game. 

A state department which will encour- 
age food production on the farms and 
which will police the game on public 
lands and waters can be made quite 
worth while, and it should be liberally 
supported just as agricultural depart- 
ments are. 

A state department which simply exe- 
cutes a lot of laws creating many new 
crimes and which does not can not save 
thq game well may be abolished. 

Oysters, Fish and Clams. 

Mr. Morrison of South Carolina says 
that his object in introducing the bill to 
abolish the office of chief game warden 
and the board of fisheries is because 
under the management of the chief game 
warden the game has been swept out of 
the state. He points out that the terrapin 
has been swept out and says the revenue 
from clams is today $19 and the oysters 
are now being fast depleted, swept from 
our shores. 

The trouble is the departments are ex- 
pected to perform an impossibility. If 
every one gathers and sells the oysters, 
clams and terrapin and no one looks af- 
ter them properly the result must be ex- 
termination. 

Some years ago there was great alarm 
in Baltimore about the vanishing oysters. 
Today oysters are produced abundantly 



168 



THE GAME BREEDER 



on leased beds and the industry is prof- 
itable. Baltimore did not loose its oys- 
ters but it became a big oyster market. 
South Carolina can become a big game 
and fish market. 

All over the country the tendency is 
to encourage the people to breed fish in 
ponds and streams for profit and for 
food. The United States Bureau of 
Fisheries supplies stock fish and advice 
as to the best fish for the different wa- 
ters and how to produce them. 

If the South Carolina- laws can be 
made so as to encourage the profitable 
breeding of fish, oysters and game the 
departments can supervise and regulate 
the industry and they will become of 
great economic importance to all of the 
people. 

As a football of politics the game eas- 
ily can be kicked off the face of the 
earth and the oysters and fish can be 
expected to go with it. Wardens who 
only put in their time collecting licenses 
and occasionally arresting people who 
fail to pay never can be expected to 
show any game or fish or oysters for the 
people to eat. 

A little ordinary common business 
sense easily can be applied to the subject 
by a statesman who will find out what 
the trouble is and will apply the proper 
remedy. Many hundreds of thousands 
of game birds now are produced on game 
farms in America and some advertisers 
in The Game Breeder are prepared to 
offer over 25,000 eggs. America soon 
will be the biggest game producing coun- 
try in the world provided the state game 
departments encourage game breeding on 
liberal terms. The oysters and the fish 
are profitable and in no danger of ex- 
tinction in places where they are properly 
looked after. 

Advice to Mr. Morrison. 

We would strongly advise Mr. Morri- 
son not to abolish the departments but 
to so frame the laws of his state that 
they will become of great economic im- 
portance to all of the people. The mar- 
kets easily can be kept full of cheap oys- 
ters, fish and game when the subject is 
handled by a statesman who will advocate 
common sense laws. 



Any one who can quickly fill the mar- 
kets of South Carolina with cheap game 
and who can attract hundreds of thou- 
sands of dollars to the farmers of the 
state for game birds for breeding pur- 
poses will cause the game always to re- 
main plentiful and cheap and the states- 
manlike performance surely will be rec- 
ognized by the people. 

Laws permitting and encouraging the 
breeding of pheasants and certain species 
of ducks have resulted in hundreds of 
thousands of pheasants and ducks being 
bred annually on American game farms 
and preserves. 

Laws preventing the profitable breed- 
ing of quail and grouse have resulted in 
the extermination of these birds on vast 
areas and the prohibition of grouse and 
quail shooting in many states. We are 
obliged to buy our quail in Mexico. 

Laws encouraging the profitable breed- 
ing of quail and grouse by game farmers 
and sportsmen soon will result in the 
quail and grouse becoming tremendously 
abundant in many places and the prohibi- 
tion of shooting no longer will be neces- 
sary to save the game. 

A limited amount of freedom on Long 
Island, New York, where quail shooting 
is permitted has resulted in excellent 
quail shooting on the numerous club 
grounds where the sportsmen look after 
their quail; and quail can be found and 
shot all over Long Island on lands where 
anyone can shoot. They always spread 
out or overflow from protected areas. 

It should be legal everywhere to breed 
American game birds for sport or profit. 
Pheasants are excellent game birds but 
our native quail and grouse are better 
than pheasants both for sport and for 
food. They can be produced at a smaller 
cost than pheasants can be and no good 
reason can be assigned why quail and 
grouse breeders should be put out of 
business by laws prohibiting the shoot- 
ing, sale and eating of quail and grouse. 

The Socialist. 

As a general thing Socialists are the 
kind of men who can be made to believe 
a turkey is all white meat. — Galveston 
News. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



169 



GAME SHOOTING CLUBS. 

By D. W. Huntington. 



Now that the laws in many states per- 
mit and encourage the breeding and sale 
of game it is important that the people 
should be educated to take advantage of 
the new laws and that the desirable food 
should quickly be made abundant and 
cheap. 

Already there are many thousands oi 
game farmers in America who are suc- 
cessfully producing game. There an; 
also thousands of sportsmen who indi- 
vidually or as members of clubs deal 
fairly with the farmers and produce 
game for sport. Some of the clubs have 
so much game that they can send some 
to market every year and in this way 
they pay a good part of the cost of the 
sport. It is important that sportsmen of 
moderate means should combine to share 
the expense of good shooting. They are 
the best customers of the game farmers 
who supply them with stock birds and 
eggs. 

It long has been evident that where 
everyone insisted upon the right to shoot 
on farms without permission the result 
was disastrous to the game. Continual 
shooting and no production must result 
in extermination. The farmers in no 
case can be expected to look after the 
game simply to induce trespassers to 
shoot up the farms. As a result of such 
shooting most of the farmers post their 
lands and prohibit sport. In all cases 
where the sportsmen combine and rent 
the shooting the game is to be found 
every year, the amount depending upon 
the amount of the protection and pro- 
duction on any place. 

There is certainly room enough in our 
vast country for all sportsmen who wish 
to do so to have good shooting. 

The first requisite is to deal fairly 
with the land owners and the second is 
to look after the game and keep it plen- 
tiful, purchasing stock birds and eggs 
from the game farmers in years when 
from overshooting or other causes the 
game is not as abundant as it should be. 

There are a great variety of shooting 



clubs or syndicates. Some have very 
small annual dues ; some have larger 
dues and elaborate clubhouses. 

Quite near New York there are some 
quail clubs with dues of $15 to $25 per 
year. These clubs usually deal with a 
few land owners renting the shooting 
and often the members arrange to stop 
at a farmhouse when shooting. One 
club I have visited has its headquarters 
in a little country hotel. Usually some- 
one is employed to look after the wild 
breeding game, part of the time at least. 
Some foxes, hawks, crows and other ver- 
min are trapped and shot and in winter 
a little food is supplied for the birds. 

No big bags are expected but some 
good shooting can be had year after year 
and occasionally when there has been a 
bad nesting season or there have been 
some bad losses due to climate in the 
winter a few dozen stock birds are pur- 
chased and liberated. Clubs of this char- 
acter usually have no game to sell, the 
members and their friends using what 
they shoot. 

Other clubs with somewhat larger dues 
employ skilled game keepers and many 
of them now produce thousands of 
pheasants, mallards, quail and other 
game birds. 

Having a big stock of breeding birds 
these clubs often can sell a good lot of 
eggs and some of them sell game to the 
game dealers and hotels and in this way 
keep their expenses down. 

It is an easy matter to start a game 
shooting club and one of the best places 
to start is a place where there is no game 
since there can be no possible objection 
to game production in such a place. It 
is an easy matter to procure stock birds 
and eggs from advertisers in The Game 
Breeder and a good game keeper soon 
will show some good shooting and some 
well-trained dogs. 

A club with a large membership can 
have comparatively small dues, a club 
with few members must have larger 
dues. It is an easy matter to figure up 



170 



THE GAME BREEDER 



the amount of game which should be 
shot and to apportion it among the 
members. 

A few guns can make up shooting 
parties for two or three days at a time 
during a long open season and a good 
rule is that where there are several ap- 
plicants for the same date that those who 
have not shot during the season shall be 
entitled to the ground. 

Since the game shot is a valuable food 
the sportsman who pays from $25 to 
$100 per year for his shooting is not 
much out of pocket, provided he obtains 
food equal in value to the amount of his 
dues or nearly so. 

The trap shooters pay for their targets 
and for the rent of the trap shooting 
grounds and after the shoot they have 
nothing to show for their money. Am- 
munition is expensive and the cost is the 
same in both cases, provided, of course, 
the game be kept plentiful and the same 
number of cartridges are used. If for 
every few shells used a game bird, worth 
from $1 to $3, is secured the sportsman 
who belongs to a game shooting club 
certainly gets the more for his money 
than any trap shooter does. 

In order that men of moderate means 
can have good shooting at a very small 
expense- it is important that some of the 
game and game eggs can be sold. 

Captain Oates, a retired English offi- 
cer, said in his excellent book on wild 
duck breeding that his good sport cost 
nothing since he had ducks to eat and 
he sold enough to pay a good part of his 
expenses. Wild ducks and in fact all 
game is very much cheaper in England 
than it is in America. 

The area suitable for shooting in Eng- 
land is very small compared to the vast 
areas in America where little or no game 
occurs today and the cost of good shoot- 
ing can be made much smaller in Amer- 
ica than it is in England. 

The important matter to be consid- 
ered by sportsmen is, that as matters 
now stand, most of the farms are closed 
to sport and by combining to share the 
expense of good shooting they easily can 
deal fairly with the farmers and can 
have excellent shooting in places where 
there is none and where there never will 



be any shooting until the sportsmen get 
busy. 

. A fair price to pay for the shooting 
is the amount of the taxes on lands and 
buildings. In many places shooting clubs 
pay 10 cents per acre or $64 per year for 
a square mile. This amount divided 
among several guns makes this item of 
cost small indeed. Where the grouse 
and quail are bred wild some one should 
be employed to look after them and to 
protect them from their natural enemies, 
to feed them in winter and to see that 
they have suitable cover and food at all 
times. 

All over America ther,e are numerous 
duck clubs which own or lease desirable 
duck shooting grounds. Now that the 
law permits the trapping of wild fowl 
for breeding purposes and the sale of 
the game all of these clubs should breed 
many wild ducks., The advantages of so 
doing are that the clubs can make their 
own open seasons for the shooting of the 
ducks they produce ; they can make their 
own bag limits and if they wish to do so 
they can sell some of their game when 
properly identified. They also can sell 
eggs and the sale of some game and eggs 
can be made to pay a good part of the 
expenses of a skilled game keeper who 
will surely make and keep the shooting 
much better than it ever has been. 

Often there is a prejudice against these 
duck clubs because they exclude others 
than members from shooting on desirable 
grounds. This prejudice can not exist 
against a club which produces wild fowl 
and which sells some of the food. There 
is no prejudice against those who pro- 
duce beef, mutton and poultry on lands 
which they own. It is important for the 
perpetuation of sport in America that all 
of the people shall be in favor of it. 
They will be when the clubs supply them 
with some cheap game. 

Where a good lot of ducks are hand- 
reared on a club ground they will attract 
and hold mr try migratory fowl. All club 
men should consider the fact that they 
should be producers as well as destroyers 
and that when it is known that they do 
produce game they will be popular on ac- 
count of their industry. 

One thing is certain that American 



THE GAME BREEDER 



171 



game farmers who advertise in The 
Game Breeder are equipped to sup- 
ply millions of pheasants and ducks 
and eggs to the game shooting clubs and 
the owners of country places who wish to 
have good shooting. It is necessary to 
send to Mexico for most of the quail for 



breeding purposes just as it was neces- 
sary to send to England and other for- 
eign countries a few years ago for pheas- 
ants and ducks and their eggs. The ab- 
surd legal situation preventing quail pro- 
duction rapidly will vanish, already it 
has departed from some states. 



THE MASSENA QUAIL CRYTONYX MASSENA. 

Elliot Coues. 

[The Massena Quail or Montezuma Quail of Mexico is a somewhat darker quail than simi- 
lar birds found in the United States which have been named Mearns quail by Dr. Nelson, to 
distinguish the sub-species. The sportsmen will do well to give the birds a trial, using Monte- 
zumas, Massenas or Mearns, since the birds should be desirable on shoots and profitable on 
game farms. The excellent account of the species is from The Birds of the North West, a 
government publication, now out of print. I have never observed these birds in a wild state 
but once I saw a good lot of them in captivity at Ronkonkoma, N. Y. I endeavored to make 
a photograph of them but the result was a failure. — Editor.] 



I found no Massena quail about Fort 
Whipple until a few days before my final 
departure. A pair were then procured, 
setting at rest the doubts I had all along 
entertained regarding the veracity of re- 
ports I had often received, of the occur- 
rence there of quail different from Gam- 
bol's. But the species must certainly be 
rare in that region, since I could not 
otherwise have overlooked it for so long 
a time. 

This remarkable quail was described 
about forty years ago by several writers, 
nearly simultaneously. For a long 
while it was only known as a Mexican 
species. It remained for American nat- 
uralists and, I may add, officers of the 
army to show its existence in our coun- 
try and give us something definite about 
its habits. In Colonel McCall's observa- 
tions upon Texan and New Mexican . 
birds, published in the Philadelphia 
Academy's Proceedings for 1851, we 
find the following interesting account : 

"The species was not seen before 
crossing the San Pedro, but it was not 
long before it made its appearance in the 
waste and rocky region into which we 
then entered. And from that time until 
we reached the Rio Pecos, a distance of 
one hundred and forty miles (westward- 
ly by the route we traveled), it was fre- 
quently seen, though I should not say it 



was very common. This region is a desert 
of great length from north to south, our 
trail crossing it at nearly right angles. 
The general face of the country is level, 
and consists of either a crumbling argil- 
laceous limestone, or a coarse, gray sand, 
producing nothing but a sparse growth 
of sand plants. Water is found only, at 
long intervals, and, except at those 
points, there is little cover for game, and 
apparently less food — the principal 
growth being cacti, of which the most 
common is cactus arborescens ; yet here, 
among projecting rocks, or on the bor- 
ders of dry gullies or in loose scrub, I 
found the Massena partridge in all the 
beauty of his rich and varied plumage. 

"The habits of this species are differ- 
ent from those of any other species of 
partridge that I have met with. They 
were in coveys of from eight to twelve 
individuals, and appeared to be extreme- 
ly simple and affectionate in disposition. 
In feeding they separated but little, keep- 
ing up a social 'cluck' all the time. They 
were so gentle as to evince little or no 
alarm on the appearance of man, scarcely 
moving out of his way as he passed, and 
only running off or flying a few yards, 
when perhaps half their number were 
laid low by a shot. This inclined me to 
think that they might with little difficulty 
be domesticated, near the habitation of 



172 



THE GAME BREEDER 



man. This trait of gentleness is the very 
opposite of those manifested by the Scaly 
partridge ( Callipepla squamata), which 
I always observed to be, though found 
perchance in grounds as little frequented 
as these, remarkably vigilant, shy and 
difficult to approach. The call or signal 
note of this species is peculiar. I never 
saw it after crossing the Pecos." 

This account of the gentle and con- 
fiding disposition of the Massena quail, 
so at variance with the character of 
nearly all the other species, agrees en- 
tirely with the representations which 
were made to me at Fort Whipple ; and 
the same trait has also been noticed by 
other writers. Don Pablo de la Llave 
noticed it in his original account of the 
birds in the following terms, which I 
copy from Mr. Cassin's translation of his 
article: "And in everything it shows an 
amiability, and, so to speak, a kindness 
of character (una bonadad de caracter) 
which is not found in any other species 
of this genus, and it is naturally so tame 
and domestic as to permit itself to be 
caught with the hand." So, also. Dr. 
Woodhouse, in the following paragraph 
from Sitgreave's report : 

"My attention was first called to this 
beautiful bird a few miles beyond the 
head of the Rio San Pedro, where we 
started three of them, and Major Backus 
succeeded in procuring a female speci- 
men, which is now in my collection. This 
was the only time I observed this bird. 
Captain S. G. French, Assistant Quarter- 
master United States Army, informs me 
that in the year 1849, when he first 
passed over this road, he met with these 
birds in a number of localities — at the 
head of the San Pedro, Howard's 
Springs, and also at the Eagle Springs- 
showing evidently that it has a range 
over the country lying between the Rio 
Grande and San Pedro Rivers. He also 
stated that he had never met with it near 
the settlements, but always among the 
wild, rocky and almost barren hills of 
this country. They are more sociable 
and not so shy as others of the same 
family. Their food appears to be prin- 
cipally insects." 

To give, as nearly as possible, a com- 



plete view of what has been put on rec- 
ord concerning the habits of the beau- 
tiful Massena, I continue with the fol- 
lowing quotations from the notes made 
by the naturalists of the Mexican Bound- 
ary Survey. It will be noticed that Mr. 
Clark's account is considerably at vari- 
ance with those just presented: 

"Once, on flushing a covey of Ortyx 
texana, my attention was attracted by a 
bird which remained behind, showing no 
inclination to follow the rest. It at- 
tempted to hide in the grass, but not to 
fly, and on being shot proved to be a 
male Massena. It occurs in pairs or 
flocks, and when flushed it flies further 
than the Virginia quail, and does not lie 
so close. They may be approached 
within a few feet, and followed up, par- 
ticularly when in pairs, running along 
before you like so many domestic fowls. 
It is quiet as well as retired ; a subdued 
though sharp note is the only noise I 
ever heard it make, and that only when 
frightened. I have seen it pursued, and 
all the barrels of a six-shooter fired at it 
without giving it alarm, and finally 
forced to fly only by an attack of stones 
and clubs. It was first met in the neigh- 
borhood of San Antonio, and thence 
sparsely distributed, as an inhabitant of' 
both prairies and mountains, as far west- 
ward as Sonora. It is a much wilder 
bird than the squamata ; less conspicu- 
ous, as also less noisy, and never seen in 
flocks, living about old camps, as is often 
the case with the latter. Its haunts are 
far removed from the habitation of man, 
and the indifference it sometimes mani- 
fests to this presence is due to its ignor- 
ance of his power and attributes. Though 
distributed over the same country as the 
squamata, it is not found in such barren 
regions as the latter frequently is, pre- 
ferring fhose regions most luxuriantly 
covered with vegetation." 

"First seen in the Canon Guapuco, 
twelve leagues south of Monterey. 
Though rather shy, it seemed quite at 
home in the cultivated fields and stubbles 
of the ranches." — D. N. Couch. 

"This bird I have never seen further 
south in Texas than Turkey Creek. In 
this vicinity it was very common, and 



THE GAME BREEDER 



173 



also at various points thence to the Rio 
Grande. In the valley of this river it is 
very rarely seen, giving way apparently 
to the Scaly and Gambel's partridges. 
West of the river it was very common 
as far as we traveled, wherever there 
was fresh and permanent water. In the 
valley of the Santa Cruz River, and 
among the adjacent hills, it was extreme- 
ly abundant. In the months of June and 
July it was observed there, always in 
pairs, while in Texas, in the months of 
October and November, it was found in 
very large flocks, sometimes of various 
ages, from the very small and partly 
fledged to the full-grown bird. When 
hunted it hides itself very closely in the 
grass, and I have often known Mexican 
soldiers in Sonora to kill them with their 
lances, by striking them either while on 
the ground or just as they rise. Some 
of these men are very expert in this 
business, and will kill many in the course 
of a day's travel." — C. B. R. Kennedy. 

It is not difficult to gain from these 
accounts a pretty definite idea of the 
range of the species in the United States, 
though we do not know how far south it 
penetrates in Mexico, which is really its 
native country. We have no record of 
it as yet as a bird of California. To the 
indications of its range in Texas and 
New Mexico. I have only to add, as just 
now done, its occurrence in Arizona at 
Fort Whipple, a locality at some dis- 
tance from those previously recorded, 
and further north, as well as west, than 
any before known. There it is rare, as 
stated, nor do I think that the species 
can be very abundant even in the south- 
ern portions of the Territory, unless it 
be at the southeast corner. 

We see that none of "the fragmentary 
published accounts are more than isolated 
facts of an imperfect history ; yet they do 
good service as contributions towards a 
biography. The bird is mentioned as an 
inhabitant of the most barren, desolate 
and unfrequented regions, as well as the 
vicinity of cultivated ranches ; as very 
unusually tame, or quite wild ; as occur- 
ring in pairs or in flocks; each account 
being circumstantial and limited. But 
this very diversity of statement helps to a 
knowledge of the bird ; and here, 



as elsewhere, I cannot refrain from 
pressing the importance of the rec- 
ord of any facts whatever, however 
isolated, that may be gleaned by 
personal observation upon the habits and 
manners of birds, no matter how small 
and unpromising the field, or how often 
it has been gone over before. Any in- 
formation, so be it that it is accurate, is 
better than none; though still it should 
be remembered that ex parte statements 
are liable to mislead, particularly when 
used in generalization, the inductive not 
being in natural history, as it is in the 
more exact sciences, always a safe 
method of reasoning. 

There are two points in the history of 
this species to which attention may profit- 
ably be directed. One is the bird's re- 
markable unsophistication. Living in 
what we should consider lonely desola- 
tion, but which is to it a happy home, the 
bird has not yet learned to throw aside 
the gentle, confiding disposition its 
Maker gave. No contact with the lords 
of the universe, guardians of civilization 
and progress, jobbers in ethics and aes- 
thetics, has yet begotten in its ingenious 
nature the wholesome change that the 
requirements of self-preservation will 
some day demand, and which it will in- 
stinctively adopt. Birds that live in pop- 
ulous districts have had a lesson to learn 
of bitter experience, and its fruits have 
been instilled through generation after 
generation, till a second nature replaces 
the first, and a shrewd distrust of the 
whole human race is instilled. It is a 
nauseous dose that these quail, like inno- 
cent children, have to swallow ; but the 
medicine acts vigorously and beneficially, 
heart-longings and soul-tbreathings, and 
the like, giving way to something more 
substantial and sensible. Some day a 
fine old cock Massena shall say to his 
family, "timeo Danaos et dona ferentes ;" 
the newly-born wisdom shall take well, 
and become gospel to succeeding gener- 
ations, to outlive in the code of quail 
ethics the memory of the Aeneid in the 
minds of men. 

We are familiar with the structural 
peculiarities of the Massena quail, and 
it is not likely that these deviations from 



174 



THE GAME BREEDER 



a common standard are not reflected in 
some way in the bird's habits and man- 
ners ; but how, we are still ignorant. 
Nothing accounting for these peculiari- 
ties has yet been learned ; and yet there 
must be some traits that, for their pro- 
per exhibition, require the special modi- 
fication that we find. These individual- 
izing traits offer an inviting field for in- 
vestigation. Mr. Cassin has, perhaps, 
taken the initiative toward such discov- 



ery, in an observation founded upon 
consideration of the bird's colors. "The 
circular spots," he says, "which are 
numerous on the inferior parts of the 
body in this partridge, appear to indicate 
as a character an analogy to the guinea- 
fowls, which is further sustained by its 
habit of uttering its note continually 
when in company with its fellows or 
when feeding." — Ellicot Cones, Birds of 
the Nortlnvcst. 



COTTONTAIL RABBITS IN RELATION TO TREES AND 

FARM CROPS. 

By D. E. Lantz, Assistant Biologist, 
U. S. Biological Survey. 



Among the serious pests in orchards 
and tree plantations are the several na- 
tive species of rabbits. These animals 
do considerable damage to garden truck 
and other farm crops also, especially 
on lands recently opened to cultivation. 
North American rabbits belong to two 
general classes easily distinguished by 
their size and habits. 

The larger forms include the arctic 
and varying hares, or snowsh'oe rabbits, 
and jack rabbits, and are found through- 
out nearly all of Alaska and Canada and 
in all the states west of the Mississippi 
except Arkansas and Louisiana. East of 
the Mississippi they inhabit the northern 
parts of Minnesota, Wisconsin and Mich- 
igan, most of New York and New Eng- 
land, and southward in the Appalachian 
mountains, parts of Pennsylvania, Mary- 
land and Virginia. 

The smaller forms, generally called 
"cottontail rabbits," occur in every state, 
but are absent from the greater part of 
Maine, the northern parts of New Hamp- 
shire, Vermont, New York, Michigan, 
Wisconsin and Minnesota, and from the 
western parts of Washington and Ore- 
gon. In recent \ears they have extended 
their range northward in the New Eng- 
land States, New York, and portions of 
the West, and have invaded and occupied 
a considerable part of the Province of 
Ontario. In habits they differ materially 



from the larger rabbits. They live in 
copses and thickets more than in open 
fields. The young are born blind, naked 
and helpless, while those of the larger 
rabbits have the eyes open, are partially 
furred, and active when born. 

Rabbits of both genera, however, feed 
exclusively on vegetation, and are at 
times harmful to crops and especially to 
trees. Because of their size and great 
abundance in parts of their range, jack 
rabbits are by far the most destructive, 
but, except in a few places where they 
have been introduced, none are found 
east of. the Mississippi. Epizootics (dis- 
eases which attack many animals at the 
same time) are an effectual natural check 
and after such attack occurs jack rabbits 
are usually so reduced in numbers that 
they are not troublesome again for sev- 
eral years. 

Traps and other devices that are ef- 
fective with cottontail rabbits do not al- 
ways succeed with jack rabbits. The rec- 
ommendations contained in this bulletin 
will, therefore, apply only to cottontail 
rabbits, but they may suggest methods 
that, with modifications, may be used 
against the larger forms. 

Cottontail rabbits are so well known 
that little need be said of their hab- 
its. They breed several times each 
year during the warmer months, the lit- 
ters averaging five or six young. The 



THE GAME BREEDER 



175 



nest is usually placed in a hollow or de- 
pression of the ground, often in open 
fields or meadows. It is composed of 
dead grass and warmly lined with fur 
which the female pulls from her own 
body. The male rabbit takes no part, m 
•caring for the young, and the female 
weans them as soon as they are able to 
leave the nest. These animals breed so 
rapidly that in spite of many natural en- 
emies, and of the fact that they are hunt- 
ed for human food, they often become 
numerous enough to inflict serious losses 
on farmers and fruit growers in many 
parts of the United States. 

Cottontail rabbits eat all sorts of herb- 
age — leaves, stems, flowers and seeds of 
herbaceous plants and grasses — and 
leaves, -buds, bark and fruits of woody 
plants or trees. They usually prefer the 
most succulent foods, as young shoots, 
tender garden vegetables, clover, alfalfa 
and fallen ripe fruits ; but they exhibit 
also a remarkable delicacy of taste in 
their selection of certain varieties of cul- 
tivated plants and in their neglect of oth- 
ers of the same species. Prof. C. V. 
Piper reports that in Oregon rabbits ate 
Arabian alfalfa down to the ground, 
while they did little or no damage to 
other varieties grown in surrounding 
plats. Prof. C. A. Mooers, of the Ten- 
nessee agricultural experiment station, 
reports similar observations in regard to 
their taste for soy beans, stating that 
they greatly relish the mammoth yellow 
variety and that it is practically the only 
one that suffers from their depredations. 
When favorite foods are absent rabbits 
resort to whatever is available. It is 
during summer droughts or when deep 
snows cut off ordinary supplies that the 
animals attack the bark of growing trees 
or shrubs. 

Cottontail rabbits are valuable for food 
and afford excellent sport for gunners. 
In many states, especially east of the Mis- 
sissippi River, they are protected as 
game. In fruit-growing and truck-farm- 
ing districts farmers regard them with 
disfavor, and there is considerable riv- 
alry between sportsmen and farmers to 
have their opposing views reflected in 
game laws. The interests of the two 
classes do not seriously differ, however, 



for when rabbits are closely hunted losses 
from their depredations are usually re- 
duced to a minimum. Still there is dan- 
ger that in years favorable for their in- 
crease the animals may inflict serious 
injury to trees during severe winters. 

Rabbits are protected (1915) by close 
seasons in states and, provinces. Twen- 
ty-eight states, Alaska and the Canadian 
provinces do not protect rabbits of any 
kind. In the District of Columbia all 
shooting is prohibited except on certain 
river marshes. In Kentucky rabbits may . 
be taken with dog, trap or snare at any 
time, and the close season for shooting 
is evidently solely for the purpose of 
keeping gunners out of fields and woods 
during the two months immediately pre- 
ceding the open season for quails. In 
Wisconsin forty-six counties, mostly in 
the southern half of the state, have no 
close season for rabbits. In California 
only cottontails, or bush rabbits, are 
protected. 

In about half the states that have a 
close season for rabbits the laws permit 
farmers and fruit growers to destroy the 
animals to protect crops or trees. Such 
provision might well be incorporated in 
game laws of all states. For lack of it 
farmers have sometimes suffered severe 
losses, and not a few have been com- 
pelled to pay fines for trying to protect 
their property from rabbits. In states 
that protect rabbits it is well for the 
farmer to be acquainted with the game 
laws and in case of doubt to have a clear 
understanding with local and state game 
wardens before undertaking to destroy 
rabbits. 

Among the agencies that help to keep 
down the numbers of rabbits few are 
more effective than carnivorous birds 
and mammals. These inrln^* large 
hawks and owls, eagles, coyotes, wild- 
cats, foxes, minks, weasels, dogs and 
cats. Eagles, the larger species of hawks, 
and all the large and medium-sized owls 
make rabbits a great part of their food. 
From the standpoint of the farmer and 
fruit grower these birds and certain 
carnivorous mammals are far more bene- 
ficial than harmful. On the other hand, 
poultry growers and sportsmen regard 
them as enemies to be destroyed when- 



176 



THE GAME BREEDER 



ever possible. In the absence of such 
natural enemies, rabbits, as well as rats 
and mice, often become a menace to val- 
uable crops. Indiscriminate slaughter of 
carnivorous birds and mammals should 
be suppressed whenever rodent pests are 
to be controlled.. 

Hunting has been the most important 
factor in keeping down the unmbers of 
rabbits in America. In some parts of 
the country the animals have been so 
reduced in numbers by shooting that 
sportsmen have invoked legislation to 
prevent their extermination. Shooting is 
undoubtedly the best method for hunting 
this animal. Ferreting is often imprac- 
ticable, since our native rabbits do not 
habitually burrow; besides, the use of 
ferrets is forbidden by law in many 
states that protect the rabbit. Coursing 
with greyhounds is popular in the west, 
where the swifter jack rabbits are abun- 
dant. Cottontails are often chased with 
foxhounds, but the beagle is rapidly tak- 
ing precedence as a favorite for hunting 
these animals, the gun being used to se- 
cure the game. 

Where the country is sufficiently open 
for the purpose, the organized hunt, in 
which everyone who owns a gun is sup- 
posed to take part, is a good means of 
reducing the number of rabbits. These 
organized hunts are popular in the west,_ 
where they are also varied, in the case 
of jack rabbits, by what is known as 
the "rabbit drive." A large territory is 
surrounded by men and the animals are 
driven into a corral built of wire netting. 
While a few cottontails are sometimes 
included in the catch, these usually find 
refuge in open burrows or under cover 
of rocks or brush, so that this method is 
hardly applicable to them. 

Rabbits are easily trapped or snared, 
and while these methods of taking them 
are slow, they are always feasible when 
cottontails infest woodlot, orchard, nur- 
sery, field or garden. Many are caught 
in old-fashioned box traps set with a fig- 
ure four trigger with cord attached to 
hold up the box lid. 

An improvement on this familiar trap, 
widely used in the middle west, and often 
called the Wellhouse trap, is a box 21 



inches long and about 6 inches high and 
4 inches wide (inside measurements) 
made of 6-inch fence boards, preferably 
old ones. The box is closed at the rear 
and has a wire door in front which, 
swings inward from the top, a cleat at 
the bottom preventing its opening out- 
ward. The trap is set and the wire door 
kept open by a wire trigger-rod held in 
place by two staples in the top of the 
box. The trigger-rod is bent downward 
into a loop or figure 8 near the rear of the 
trap. As the rabbit enters the trap and 
crowds into the back part it presses 
against the loop, moves the trigger-rod 
backward and is imprisoned as the wire 
door is released and falls. Bait may be 
used but is unnecessary, since cottontails 
frequently take refuge in dark places 
from enemies or inclement weather. 

The materials needed for making a 
Wellhouse trap are : Four boards 1 by 6, 
21 inches long, for the sides ; a piece 1 
by 6, 8 inches long, for the back ; a small 
cleat for the door stop ; 28^4 inches of 
wire for the door ; 22 inches of wire for 
the trigger; 4 small staples for hanging 
the door and trigger ; and nails. 

Mr. J. M. Walmsley recently sent to 
the department photographs and a de- 
scription of a permanent rabbit trap 
made of sewer tile and used on his and 
other forms in Kansas. A 12 by 
6 inch "tee" is set with the long end 
downward and buried so that the 6-inch 
opening is below the surface of the 
ground. Two lengths of 6-inch sewer 
pipe are then connected horizontally with 
the opening. Soil is placed over the 
joints to exclude light. The upright tile 
should be fitted with a tight removable 
cover — Mr. Walmsley uses old harrow 
disks for the purpose. The projecting 
end of the small tile is surrounded with 
rocks, brush or wood, so as to make the 
hole look inviting to rabbits, and that 
they may appropriate the den as a place 
of concealment and shelter. A number 
of these traps in various places, and es- 
pecially in the vicinity of the orchard, 
have kept Mr. Walmsley 's farm com- 
paratively free of rabbits. Rabbits oc- 
cupy these tile traps, go in or out at will, 
and may be captured when desired.. 
Whenever Mr. Walmsley visits his traps. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



177 



he is accompanied by a trained dog that 
locates the trapped animals. The cover 
is lifted from the upright tile and the 
rabbit captured by hand ; if it bolts from 
the side opening it is caught by the dog. 
A short pole fitted with a 5-inch wooden 
disk may be inserted in the side opening 
to prevent escape. 

These traps are especially suitable for 
open lands and prairies, where rabbits 
can not find many natural hiding places. 
Built on waste land, they may become a 



permanent part of the farm equipment 
and will cost nothing for repairs from 
year to year. Their first cost may be 
greatly reduced by use of second-grade 
or even broken tiles. If one wishes to 
poison rabbits, the baits may be placed 
inside these traps and domestic animals 
or birds will not be endangered. The 
Walmsley trap also furnishes an excel- 
lent means of obtaining rabbits for the 
table or even for market without dam- 
aging them by shooting. 



NOTES FROM THE GAME FARMS AND PRESERVES. 



An Interesting Quail. 

We would strongly advise all quail 
breeders to give the Massena or Mearns 
quail a trial. These birds surely will 
bring excellent prices and since they are 
reported to lie well to the dogs they will 
undoubtedly be in great demand. In 
appearance the birds resemble a little 
brown guinea hen with white spots. The 
birds still occur in New Mexico and 
Arizona and they are plentiful in some 
parts of Mexico. The Massena is the 
name given the Mexican bird. The 
Northern species found in the United 
States was named the Mearns quail by 
Dr. Nelson, chief of the Biological Sur- 
vey. 

Quail Sales. 

There seems to.be no objection in 
many states to the sale and shipping of 
live quail and eggs for breeding pur- 
poses. This is as it should be. 

The State Department, which endeav- 
ors to hamper or stop the breeding of 
game, will stand a good chance of being 
abolished. The department which shows 
a disposition to encourage game produc- 
tion has a good excuse for its existence 
and soon it can be made of great eco- 
nomic importance as we have often re- 
marked. 

Rabbits Do Their Bit. 

Salina, Kan., Jan. 4. — Practically 
every town and county in Western Kan- 
sas is having what is called a Red Cross 
hunt this month. Rabbits are unusually 



plentiful throughout the West, and real 
rabbit drives are being held, all of the 
rabbits sold for shipment to the Eastern 
States and the money is turned over to 
the Red Cross fund. 

The other day a drive wa.> held near 
Zurich, and more than 600 rabbits were 
killed. They were sold at 8 cents each 
for shipment to New York and other 
Eastern points, where it is said they are 
retailing at 75 cents each, while the jack- 
rabbits are selling at $1. 

In the Zurich hunt people from all 
the surrounding counties participated, 
some coming as much as fifty miles, re- 
garding it as their patriotic duty. 

Ringneck Pheasant in New Jersey. 

Several days ago I noticed an article in 
the Rod and Gun by Chokes and Bores 
of New Jersey giving his creed as to 
conservation. 

I cannot pass up his remark that he 
did not believe in stocking the State with 
English pheasant. He gave no reason 
for this, and therefore I take it he had 
none. To my mind there is every, reason 
in the world for continuing to stock 
Northern Jersey with ringneck pheas- 
ant. This part of the State abounds in 
splendid pheasant cover and affords 
plenty of natural food for the birds ex- 
cept under the most unfavorable weather 
conditions. In spite of the terribly se- 
vere winter last year pheasants were 
plentiful this fall. 

The only game bird of any numbers 
now left in Northern Jersey is the ring- 



178 



THE GAME BREEDER 



neck pheasant. Grouse have all but be- 
come extinct ; woodcock are becoming 
scarcer and scarcer ; quail are very sel- 
dom seen. If it were not for pheasant 
one could hunt day after day in many 
sections and his dog would never have 
a chance to freeze on a point. 

The ringneck pheasant is perhaps the 
easiest game bird to raise in captivity. 
This is an important point in its favor. 
After the first few weeks pheasant are 
about as difficult to grow as chickens. 
The State has already done some good 
work with these birds, and the sections 
in which they have been released have 
afforded some excellent sport. 

I confess that the English pheasant is 
far from being a perfect game bird. He 
does not lie well to a dog and often fre- 
quents land that is under water, thus 
making it hard for a dog to pick up the 
scent ; but when brought to bag he is ex- 
tremely beautiful and a splendid bird on 
the table. He appears easier to hit than 
he really is, and taken all in all is a far 
more satisfactory game bird than none 
would be. — The Sun. 



Egg Percentages. 

Those who have been provident and 
who have held over a good stock of 
breeding birds are fortunate since the 
prices of pheasants, wild ducks, quail 
and turkeys are higher than ever before, 
and it is evident they will go higher and 
that many can not procure breeding stock 
at any price. There is a great temptation 
always to shoot more birds than good 
management would allow but fortunately 
the big commercial game farms have 
held many thousands of birds and hun- 
dreds of thousands of eggs will be sold 
this spring. We doubt, however, if there 
will be enough early eggs to supply the 
demands since many new game farms 
and new shooting clubs and individual 
preserves are being started all over the 
country. 

Those who rely on purchased eggs are 
interested in egg percentages. Owen 
Jones, one of the best English authori- 
ties, says, "If eighty eggs hatch out in 
a hundred this is considered good ; if 
less than seventy hatch this is bad. A 



keeper may congratulate himself if he 
turns a thousand pheasants into covert 
from fifteen hundred eggs set ; anything 
below one bird turned into covert from 
two eggs is considered a poor result. 
Keepers believe that chicks cannot be 
hatched too late in May or too early in 
June." 

There can be no doubt that eggs laid 
on the ground are better than purchased 
eggs ; the percentage of birds hatched 
will be somewhat better frcrr. heme eggs 
than from those shipped but we have had 
excellent results from purchased eggs in 
our experimental , work , and the adver- 
tisers in The Game Breeder know how 
to pack and ship eggs safely. 



Contract Rearing. 

We have heard from a number of ad- 
vertisers that they have received, substan- 
tial contracts from our readers for 
pheasants to be reared and delivered in 
September and October. Some of the 
prices named in letters to the magazine 
are $1.75 and $2.00 per bird, September 
and October delivery. 



A Good Order. 

One advertiser writing to praise the 
results obtained from his advertisement 
says he has just received an order for 
5,000 pheasants for October delivery, the 
price being $8 per trio. He says he has 
recently received oth.er good orders for 
an aviry species. We are always glad to 
hear that advertisements produce good 
results. 



Wild Ducks. 



A number of our advertisers will trap 
wild ducks for breeding purposes under 
permits issued by the U. S. Biological 
Survey. The demand for ducks is so 
great, however, that it seems evident 
there will not be enough to supply all 
those who wish to undertake duck breed- 
ing. 

Some readers have reported that they 
could not get all the ducks and eggs they 
wish to purchase for breeding purposes. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



179 



Duck Eggs. 

Since freshly trapped ducks often are 
too wild to lay eggs the first season, read- 
ers who wish to breed teal, pintails, gad- 
walls and other species besides the mal- 
lards are advised to purchase the eggs of 
these species. Although it is legal to 
take eggs for breeding purposes, under 
permits issued by the b. S. Biological 
Survey, comparatively few game breed- 
ers in the United States are equipped to 
gather eggs and in fact most of the wild 
ducks breed so far north that no eggs 
can be gathered in many of the state's. 

Our Minnesota and Dakota readers 
and readers in all of the northern states 
are advised to take out permits and to 
gather some eggs for breeding purposes 
and for sale to other breeders who hold 
permits. They surely can get excellent 
prices for wild duck eggs if they will ad- 
vertise them in The Game Breeder. 



Teal and Other Shoal Water Ducks. 

Any breeder who will establish a flock 
of teal, gadwalls, pintails and other river 
ducks that will breed under control in 
protected marshes will have a valuable 
property \since the demand for these 
ducks, which are tame enough to lay 
eggs, is great and it surely will increase 
since the new clubs and preserve own- 
ers are aware that it is desirable to have 
other ducks besides the common mal- 
lards. 

Teal are splendid ducks both for sport 
and for food and they are regarded by 
many sportsmen as the best ducks we 
have. 



Foxes and Nests. 

In the counties in England where fox 
hunting is a popular sport and where 
foxes are preserved the game keeper has 
great difficulty in protecting his nests. 
In The Game Keeper's note book we are 
told that, "The keeper who must pre- 
serve game and foxes takes steps to over- 
come the scent of his birds. He sprin- 
kles the neighborhood of all nests he 
can find with some ill-smelling fluid. 
But the foulest or strongest scent will 
not save a bird when a fox has once seen 
her. Fortunately he is not clever enough 



to know a new trap from an old one, nor 
a sound from a broken one, and the 
keeper finds at nesting time a good use 
for his disused traps, placing them about 
birds setting in dangerous spots. Any- 
thing in the shape of scrap iron the fox 
suspects ; anything unusual about a nest, 
such as a piece of newspaper or a bush 
nearby, will arouse his fears, and pos- 
sibly save a bird's life. But as rooks 
learn to treat scarecrows with contempt, 
so foxes learn to have no fear for harm- 
less terrors, and the keeper rings the 
changes on all the fox-alarming devices 
which ingenuity can suggest." 



Fox Hounds on the Preserve. 

In America where the preserves are 
widely separated the keeper must con- 
tend with the foxes which will come 
to him from all four sides of his 
ground and an abundance of game surely 
will attract the foxes. It is a good plan 
to keep a brace or more of fox hounds 
and to let them run the foxes often. It 
is easy to discover the route taken by a 
fox when pursued and he will repeated- 
ly run over the same course. A few guns 
stationed on the line of his flight can 
get an easy shot which will put an end 
to the fox. 

Foxes are very difficult to trap but 
traps adroitly set in paths where the 
foxes travel will take some of them and 
Owen Jones suggests that a cat buried 
in a likely place where the fox must 
step on the trap in order to approach it 
makes a good bait. . 



Lures and Charms. 

To draw rats into his traps the keeper 
sprinkles them with the sweet-scented 
oil of rhodium and oil of aniseed. To 
attract 'cats he uses tincture of valerian ; 
the essences in the root of that plant 
having so great a charm for cats that it 
will draw them from far and near. To 
attract stoats and weasels he uses oil 
of musk. To entice a fox a dead cat is 
one of the best lures and many a fox, to 
our knowledge, has owed fts death to an 
over-keenness in unearthing a cat that 



180 



THE GAME BREEDER 



had been shot and lightly buried. 
— The Game Keeper's Note Book. 

At the preserve of the Long Island 
Game Breeders Association steel traps 
baited with fish caught both cats and 
skunks. 



Traps for Pheasants and Ducks. 

A very simple trap to take up pheas- 
ants and to trap wild ducks is a good 
sized pen made of chicken wire with one 
or more openings, after the style of a lob- 
ster pot. 

A round cylinder of wire with one 
end opening through the side of the pen 
and the other a few feet inside is all 
that is necessary but if the opening at 
the side of the pen is larger than the 
inner end of the cylinder the birds will 
go in more readily. 

Corn or wheat scattered on a line 
leading to and through the opening will 
be followed by the birds to the grain 
liberally scattered inside the pen. The 
birds will run around the sides of the 
pen, jumping over the cylinder entrance 
and do not seem to have sense enough 
to go out as they came in. 

Captain Oates, in his. book on wild 
ducks, describes another very simple pen 
to trap ducks which requires an attend- 
ant. • 

A wire pen is constructed at the edge 
of the water • frequented by the ducks 
with the front on the water open. The 
entire front slides up and is held by a 
When this is pulled by the attendant in 
simple catch to which a cord is attached, 
ambush some distance away the front 
falls and the ducks within are caught. 
Tame mallards are used to decoy the 
ducks into the pen. The wild ducks, see- 
ing the decoys feeding, readily follow 
them and often a good number are taken 
at a time. 



same species, seeking to deprive it of its 
prey. Both birds had attained a con- 
siderable height when the robber, after 
making several unsuccessful attempts 
from above, darted in from below and 
fastened upon the rabbit, wresting it 
from the opponent. Hawk number two 
was turned several times in the air by 
the falling rabbit, and, before it could 
regain its equilibrium, had lost its hold 
on the ill-gotten treasure. Just at that 
instant hawk number three appeared on 
the scene and, swooping down, picked 
up the coveted prize before it had 
reached the ground and made away with 
it, unpursued. — Oregon Sportsman. 



Number of Pheasant Eggs and 
Chicks. 

From 15 to 17 is the proper number of 
pheasant eggs to be placed under a com- 
mon hen and a similar number of chicks 
should be placed in each coop on the 
rearing field. Fifteen is a safe number 
for the average hen but some hens will! 
handle 17 nicely. 



Hawks Fight Over Rabbit. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bart Shea, of Burns, 
report a very interesting sight viewed 
from their farm near Crow Camp, one 
day during the past winter. 

A large American goshawk had caught 
a rabbit and was carrying it away when it 
was attacked by another hawk, of the 



The Kitchen Garden. 

An ordinary kitchen garden which is 
not weeded too closely makes an excel- 
lent feeding ground for young pheasants. 
The beans, asparagus, potatoes, corn, let- 
tuce, beets and other vegetables and the 
small fruits all have a variety of insects 
and the birds will procure many green 
weed seeds ; the lettuce and grass all will 
be sampled by the young pheasants. 
Upon several occasions when I cared 
more about the pheasants than I did 
about the garden I reared several fine 
broods by letting the hens run with the 
young birds in the garden. They were 
fed very little usually when the hen 
brought them in to the coops where they 
were shut up for the night; many days 
they received no attention and were not 
fed at all. 

Most beginners, I am sure, feed 
their young pheasants too much. A very 
little hard boiled egg, grated and served 
with the pheasant meal and a very little 
chick-grain as the birds grow older is all 
they require, and when they have a good: 



THE GAME BREEDER 



181 



range in the grass or garden where they 
can procure weed seeds and insects in 
abundance a mere trace of food before 
the coops is all the pheasants will require 
and they never should be given more 
than they will eat quickly. No stale 

food should be kept before the coops. 

♦ 

Ringnecks. 

The prices of ringnecked pheasants 
rose rapidly as we predicted they 
would as the breeding season approached. 
Since it is very evident there will be a 
big demand for pheasant eggs and that 
those who advertise in The Game 
Breeder can sell their eggs for $25 per 
hundred it is not surprising that owners 
of pheasants prefer to sell them after 
they have produced $10 or $15 worth of 
eggs and many young pheasants besides. 
This year it seems likely the prices for 
birds will remain well up throughout the 
year since clubs and individual shoots 
are purchasing more than ever before. 



Aviary Pheasants. 

Our suggestion that the game clubs 
and preserve owners should have a few 
pens of aviary pheasants seems to have 
increased the demand for these birds. 
We have letters from readers saying they 
cannot procure all the Golden, Silver, 
Amherst, Reeves and other aviary spe- 
•cies they wish to purchase. 

Readers should remember that as the 
breeding season approaches it is a poor 
time to try and buy any species of birds. 
The owner of an aviary pheasant which 
soon will lay a score and more of eggs 
worth from 50 cents to several dollars 
each will often not be willing to part with 
the bird about to lay the golden eggs. A 
few dollars will not tempt the owner of 
a bird about to produce $10 or more dol- 
lars. He prefers always to gather ^the 
money from the eggs and to sell the hen 
a little later even if he gets a little less 
for the bird. 



Increase in Game With Cats Killed. 

Mount Holly, N. J., June 15.— Not in 
many years have sportsmen found game 
as plentiful in Burlington County as last 
season. Hundreds of hunters have re- 
peatedly bagged their legal limit of ten 



rabbits a day in addition to making good 
scores on pheasants, quail and squirrels. 

Sportsmen and farmers in this section 
of the State declare that the warfare 
waged on vagrant cats during the last 
two years has been the chief factor in 
bringing a big increase not only in game 
animals and birds but also in native song 
birds. 

Fear that the cats might be spreading 
germs of the foot and mouth disease in 
their wanderings from farm to farm 
caused dairymen upon the recommenda- 
tion of State health authorities to open 
the campaign against cats during the 
1915 epidemic. 

Many granges in south Jersey later ad- 
vocated the killing of cats to save the 
insect eating birds that are so important 
to profitable farming and orcharding. 

It was found that a surprisingly large 
number of homeless cats made their 
abode in the woods, preying upon native 
animals and birds. 

Sportsmen who have made it a rule to 
kill such cats whenever they find them 
while hunting have issued an estimate 
that every such cat killed means approx- 
imately twenty-five rabbits and fifty birds 
saved during the following year. 



Bellmore Farmers Plan Hunt for Wild 
Boars. 

Farmers and citizens of the Bellmore 
section of Long Island who possess any 
kind of firearm are awaiting a snow- 
fall so they can go on a hunt for the six 
boars that escaped from the Phipps re- 
serve at Wantagh, and earn a big reward 
offered for them, dead or alive. 

Some time ago the boars escaped from 
the estate of John S. Phipps and made 
off into the woods. They were savage 
and have been doing much damage. Sev- 
eral times they have attacked farmers 
who saw them rooting up cabbages, and 
thought they were domestic hogs. 

If there is no snowfall within a few 
days hounds will be used and a hunt 
started to exterminate the animals. 
Some of the soldiers from Camp Mills 
who live in the wild country of Oregon 
want to join in the hunt, which it is 
expected will make the meets of the 
Meadow Brook Hunt Club seem like an 
exercise gallop. 



182 



THE GAME BREEDER 



T*?5 Game Breeder 

Published Monthly 
Emted by DWIGHT W. HUNTINGTON 

NEW YORK, MARCH, 1919. 

TERMS: 
10 Cents a Copy — $1.00 a year in Advance. 

Postage free to all subscribers in the United Stapes. 
To All ForeignCourrtries and Canada, $1.25. 



The Game Conservation Society, Inc. 
publishers, 150 nassau st., new york 

D. W. Huntington, President, 

F. R. Peixotto, Treasurer, 

J. C. Huntington, Secretary. 

E. Dayton, Advertising Manager. 
Telephone, Beekman 3685. 



We hope some of our South Carolina 
readers will write to Representative J. B. 
Morrison and urge him not to insist on 
abolishing the state game department but 
to see that a law be enacted requiring the 
department to encourage game breeding 
on the farms and the proper policing of 
the game on public lands and waters. 



TRAPPING GAME. 

In New York not long ago a fine of 
$15,000 was imposed and paid because a 
landowner trapped a few wild ducks for 
breeding purposes. The Game Breeder 
gave full publicity to the outrage in the 
name of the law. Today any farmer 
or preserve owner in New York can 
trap any species of game for breeding 
purposes upon payment of $1.00 for a 
license to do so, and the United States 
issues permits without charge to take 
migratory water fowl for breeding pur- 
poses. We are not lobbyists, but we 
observe with pleasure the effect which 
our pubilicity and comment has on the 
game laws. Rapidly they are changed to 
meet the views of breeders as expressed 
in the magazine. In this connection we 
wish to give credit to readers who write 
for the magazine pointing out legal 
wrongs which should be made right. 
These opinions of others when we give 



them publicity have more weight often 
than anything we can say. 

As an illustration, when General Win- 
gate, of the Wyandanch Club, wrote 
that it was desirable to take up quail in 
exposed situations and to feed them in 
the winter in places where they would be 
safe from deep snow, he pointed out 
that it was illegal in New York thus to 
save the quail. 

Now it is legal in New York to trap 
and to thus save the quail in winter and 
also to trap any species of game for 
breeding purposes. 

FARM GAME. 

The farmers throughout America are 
beginning to take a decided interest in 
the game laws as they affect the value 
of farm property and country living. 
Professor Bailey of Cornell Agricultural 
College, writing to the editor of The 
Game Breeder said the farmers' inter- 
ests should be considered in making our 
game laws. More recently Professor 
Needham of the same college said the 
farmer should have the right to produce 
any kind of plant or animal and that he 
should possess his farm in peace. 

Often we have pointed out that the at- 
tempt made by state game departments 
to rent the shooting on the farms for 
$1.00 per year to all applicants only 
could result in a failure to preserve field 
sports or even to save the game from 
extinction in closely cultivated regions. 

The farmers are opposed to having 
bands of licensed trespassers shoot up 
their farms. At a hearing before Gov- 
ernor Glynn some years ago when he 
was the governor of New York a state 
senator spoke with much emphasis on 
this subject. He said the farmers in his 
district were opposed to sport and tres- 
passing sportsmen. Horses, cattle and 
poultry had been shot on the farms in 
his district, fences had been broken 
down, gates left open and other dam- 
age had resulted from the farms being 
raided by licensed sportsmen. 

Farmers who find their trespass signs 
are not heeded always are ready to put 
game birds on the song bird list and to 
put an end to sport for terms of years or 
forever. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



183 



Where the farmers are wise they will 
see that all such prohibitive legislation 
contains a permissive section, similar to 
section 12 in the new United States stat- 
ute, protecting migratory wild fowl. 
This section provides that nothing in the 
law shall be construed to prevent the 
breeding of game on game farms and 
preserves and the sale of the birds in 
order to increase our food supply. 

The farmers should not overlook the 
fact that preventive legislation reduces 
the value of the farm. They should re- 
serve the right to have all species of 
game for profit. 

If the farmers will insist that they 
should have the right to produce game 
profitably, if they wish to do so they 
will at once add to the value of the 
farms. No farmer is obliged to have 
game on his farm if he does not wish to 
do so under protective laws. In many 
cases it is simply a tempting bait for li- 
censed trespassers. This will not be true 
when the farmer owns the game he pro- 
duces on his farm. 

The farmer who decides to have game 
for profit, or who decides to rent the 
shooting on his place to agreeable people 
who will look after the game properly, 
soon will find that there is no trespassing 
and that the game will more than pay the 
taxes on his lands and buildings and if 
he wishes to sell game and game eggs 
he can make a lot of money besides. 

One thing is certain, a farm where it 
is legal to produce such a desirable food, 
as game is, undoubtedly is worth more 
than one where it is criminal to produce 
such food either for profit or for sport 
as the farmer may decide. 



DEER AND RABBITS ON THE 
FARM. 

Laws protecting deer and rabbits 
often result in these animals becoming 
more abundant than it is desirable to 
have them on farms or in farming re- 
gions. The natural enemies of deer, the 
cougar, and wildcats, and eagles, are 
practically extinct in many states, and 
the illegal killing of a deer is easily de- 
tected, far more so than the illegal 



shooting of game birds is. The result 
is that the deer increase in protected 
regions and often they do much damage 
on a farm. Laws have been enacted per- 
mitting farmers to kill deer when they 
destroy their crops. The law should 
provide that deer on a farm belong to the 
farmer, that he can have deer for profit 
if he wishes to do so (this now is the 
law in some states), that he can kill the 
deer and sell the food or rent the shoot- 
ing if he wishes to do so. Deer on pub- 
lic or wild lands and in public parks well 
may be protected by laws providing for 
closed seasons and regulating the shoot- 
ing. 

Rabbits breed rapidly, several times a 
year, and the litters average five or six 
young. In fruit growing and truck 
farming districts the rabbits do a vast 
amount of damage. The farmers natur- 
ally are opposed to the sportsman's laws 
protecting these animals for sport. As 
Mr. Lantry well says, in a bulletin issued 
by the United States Department of 
Agriculture : "There is considerable 
rivalry between sportsmen and farmers 
to have their opposing views reflected in 
game laws." As a result a good part of 
the time of the state legislators annually 
is devoted to a discussion of changes in 
the game laws, and it is fair to say that 
this kind of legislation costs hundreds 
of thousands of dollars every year. 

Criminal laws should be permanent 
and not changed every year. It should 
be' an easy matter to make a rabbit law 
providing for an open season for these 
animals during the fall and winter when 
the flesh is a desirable food and provid- 
ing that the farmer can kill rabbits at 
any time on his farm when they are 
found injurious to his fruit trees or vege- 
tables, and that he can sell his rabbits 
alive or dead. The attempt to protect 
animals for public sport on private farms 
never has and never can be expected to 
produce the results sought by the legis- 
lation. It would be unreasonable to 
license ball players to play ball in the 
farmer's wheat field, and it is fully as 
unreasonable to license gunners to shoot 
rabbits or other game on the farmers' 
gardens or orchards and to protect the 
rabbits in order that sport in such places 



184 



THE GAME BREEDER 



may be perpetuated. The sooner sports- 
men become aware that they can not 
keep up sport on occupied farms 
against the wishes of the owners the bet- 
ter it will be for sport. 



THE FARMER AND THE RABBIT. 

Since the rabbit no doubt often does a 
lot of damage on a farm, the farmer 
should decide if he wishes to have rab- 
bits and if it will pay to have rabbits. 
There are various methods of protecting 
orchards and gardens from rabbits, and 
there can be no doubt that it will pay to 
have rabbits on many farms, provided 
the farmer owns the rabbits and can 
trap or shoot them and can sell them 
alive for propagation or as food if he 
wishes to use or to sell the food. Rabbit 
shooting is an interesting sport, and the 
farmer's boy will find the sport attrac- 
tive. Where the shooting is lively the 
numbers of the rabbits will be kept 
down. 

The rabbit am be made an interesting 
and profitable farm asset, provided it 
pays to look after the game and to keep 
it from doing any damage to orchard and 
garden. It should be an easy matter to 
have plenty of rabbits, and an advertise- 
ment in The Game Breeder surely will 
sell them at attractive prices. 

Rabbits are a good winter food, and it 
is well known that they are a protection 
to more desirable and profitable feath- 
ered game, the quail, grouse and pheas- 
ants, which should be abundant and pro- 
fitable on every farm. Foxes and other 
ground vermin find rabbits ea,sier to 
catch than winged game is, and Owen 
Jones, a talented English game-keeper 
and author, says: "The rabbit is the 
fox's bread and butter." 

When it pays to have game on a farm, 
as it now does in states which have en- 
acted game breeders' laws, it will pay 
the farmer to have plenty of rabbits. 
Sportsmen should make arrangements 
with the farmers, who are willing to rent 
shooting, and in many places they now 
pay all of the farmer's taxes. 
■•- 

Prohibition a Failure. 

Two years additional immunity for the 
quail in this state, New York, has been 



provided in a bill just signed by Gover- 
nor Whitman. The quail, or bob white, 
as it is more familiarly known in certain 
parts of the state, some years ago be- 
came so markedly reduced in numbers 
that in 1913 a five-year closed season was 
provided for this bird. 

That period has now elapsed, but, ac- 
cording to reports received by the con- 
servation committee from observers in 
all parts of the state, quail have failed to 
make much headway in regaining their 
former numbers. The new law has 
therefore been passed in order that the 
birds may have further opportunity to 
reestablish themselves. It is expected 
they will be assisted by a decrease of 
their natural enemies, as a result of the 
rifles with which all game protectors are 
hereafter to be provided. 

Long Island is an exception to the new 
law, where quail are fortunately suffi- 
ciently numerous to warrant their being 
taken from Nov. 1 to Dec. 31. 

In other parts of the state farmers as 
well as sportsmen, are said to be longing 
for the return of the quail, which is well 
known to be a great devourer of weed 
seeds and injurious insects. According 
to the Conservation Commission, the quail 
is one" of the few birds known to make a 
practice of eating potato bugs. 

Commisioner George D. Pratt says 
every effort will be made to bring back 
once more to the farms the cheery call 
of the bob white, a sound so commonly 
heard in years gone by. 

[We suggest to the up-state sportsmen to 
try the Long Island plan. Start some quail 
clubs ; look after the birds properly ; intro- 
duce some new breeding stock. Start up the 
shooting before all the bird dogs die of old 
age. Mischief makers were run off of Long 
Island by the quail clubs recently and anyone 
can go out on Long Island and find some 
quail shooting, since the clubs keep up the 
supply for others as well as their members. — 
Editor.l 

Here is a formula which can be used 
to advantage in any legislative assembly 
when it is proposed to make the prairie 
grouse, the ruffed grouse or others pro- 
tected songsters : 

"Nothing in the act shall be construed 
to prevent the breeding of the birds on 
farms and their sale for the purpose of 
increasing the food supply." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



186 



Wild Mallard Ducks 
and Ringncck Pheasants "M 

WRITE TOR PRICES 



S 



Scarboro Beach Game Farm 

R. E. BULLOCK, Manager 

SCARBORO, - MAINE 

Member of the Game Guild 

Wc Furnish Eggs in Season 



ymmw^w*®^ 



KWt'W^i^ 






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It is now legal to trap Wild Ducks and other 
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shooting of ducks, etc. 

Price, $2.00 Postpaid 

The Game Conservation Society, Publishers 
150 Nassau St. New York, N. Y. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game.' 



186 



THE GAME BREEDER 




FENCES 

POR GAME PRESERVES 

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THE GAME BREEDER 



187 



OUR FEATHERED GAME 

A manual on American Game 
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color, and bird portraits of all 
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By D. W. HUNTINGTON 

Editor of The Game Breeder 

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North America with pictures of all 
big game animals. 

By D. W. HUNTINGTON 

Editor of the Game Breeder 

PRICE $2.00 



WILD DUCK FOODS 

Wild Celery, Sago Pond Weed. Widgeon Grass, Red-Head Grass, Chara and other foods which 
attract water fowl. We have the best duck foods which will attract and hold the game and which 
impart the finest flavor to the flesh. We plan and arrange the plantings suitable to all waters. 

GOOD SHOOTING 

DURING THE OPEN SEASON 

I am prepared to entertain a number of sportsmen who wish to shoot wild geese, Canvasback and 
other wild ducks and quail, snipe, etc. Only small parties can be properly looked after. Appoint- 
ments to try, the shooting and learn about the wild duck foods are made by correspondence. 

J. B. WHITE WATERULY, CURRITUCK SOUND, NORTH CAROLINA 

Member of THE GAME GUILD 



Game Wanted 



^ We are in the market to buy game birds and deer 
raised on licensed game preserves. We can use 
quantities of venison, pheasants and mallard duck 
raised on licensed game farms and preserves which can 
be sold in New York State throughout the yea-T but 
coming from points outside of New York State preserves 
must also have the New York State License in order to 
be permitted to ship in this State and be sold here. 

If you have game to sell, let us hear from you. 

House of A. Si IZ 



414—420 West 14th Street 



NEW YORK CITY 



Cable Address, SILZ, NEW YORK, Telephone, CHELSEA 4900 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



188 



THE GAME BREEDER 



WILD DUCKS AND WILD GEESE 



It Is Now Legal to Trap Wild 
Fowl for Breeding Purposes 

Write to The Biological Survey, Washington, D. C, for information about Trapping Permits 

The book, OUR WILD FOWL AND WADERS, written by the 
Editor of The Game Breeder, contains full information about the 
trapping of wild fowl and how to rear the birds for profit and 
for sport. There are chapters on How to Form Shooting Clubs ; 
How to Control the Enemies of Wild Fowl, etc. Fully illustrated 
with pictures of ducks on preserves, etc. 

PRICE, #2.00 POSTPAID 

THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau St., NEW YORK 




PROFITS IN FUR FARMING 

Learn about the wonderful Black Fox 
Industry which has proven so profitable 
to breeders. 

Read the Black Fox Magazine, the only 
paper of its kind in the world. 

SAMPLE COPY FREE. 
Subscription $1.50 per year. 

THE BLACK FOX MAGAZINE 

15 Whitehall Street, New York 




Decoy Owls for Crow and Hawk Shooting 
Established 1860 Telephone 4569 Spring 

PRED SAUTER 

Leading Taxidermist of America 
42 Bleecker Street New York City 

Corner Lafayette Street Subway Station at the Door 

Specialist in All Branches of Taxidermy 

Write for Illustrated Catalogue 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game.' 



THE GAME BREEDER 



189 




We Arc Now 

Booking 

Orders for 

Eggs 

for Spring Delivery from the following vari- 
eties of pheasants : Silver, Golden. Ringneck, 
Lady Amherst, Formosan. White, Mongolian, 
Reeves, Swinhoe, Versicolor. Impeyan, Soem- 
mering, Manchunan Eared, Melanotus, Black- 
throated Golden, Lineated and Prince of Wales. 

Also Wild Turkeys, Japanese Silkies, Long- 
tails, and Mallard Ducks. S. C. Buff Orping- 
ton and R. I. Red fowls. 

We also offer for sale five varieties of 
Peafowl. Also Crane, Swan and Fancy Ducks, 
Doves of several varieties. Deer. Jack. 
Rabbits 

Send $1.00 in stamps for Colony pe Catalogue 

CHILES & COMPANY 

MT. STERLING KENTUCKY 

Member of The Game Guild 
Member of The American Game Breeders Society 



TOO LATE TO CLASSIFY 

WILD AND BRONZE TURKEY EGGS. PARCEL 

Post Prepaid. VALLEY VIEW FARM, Belleville, 

Pennsylvania. It 

PHEASANTS WANTED 
I will buy ringnecked pheasants regardless of sex as 
long as they are strong, healthy birds, large and not 
over two years old. Will purchase small or large num- 
bers for cash. Reference by permission to the Game 
Breeder. ROBT. BOWMAN, care Game Breeder, 
ISO Nassau St., New York, N. Y. 

BANTAMS — GOOD GENTLE BIRDS SUITABLE 
for quail and pheasant breeding JOHN E. DARBY, 
Prop., Maplehurst Poultry Farm, Croswell, Michigan. 

BANTAMS — WIL BERT'S FAMOUS BANTAMS. 
Forty varieties. Shipped on approval. Catalog Sjt. 
F. C. WILBERT, Grand Rapids, Michigan. 

GAMEKEEPER, SITUATION WANTED. PRAC- 

tical and reliable manager and head gamekeeper of 
gentleman's shooting preserve. Handler and trainer of 
high class shooting dogs. Widely experienced here and 
abroad in breeding, rearing and developing puppies; 
skilled shot, expert trapper of vermin. Also a thorough 
expert on rearing same. A capable man to show sport, 
References. J. H. WISE, 214 East 68th St., New York. It 

RUFUS REDS, GAME BIRDS, FURBEARERS 

Our literature of National Show Champions, 
Rums Reds. How we raise and sell them at pop- 
ular prices, also price list pheasants, game birds 
and fur-bearing animals, FREE on application. 
W. F. KENDRICK, President, The Ameri- 
can Game Association, Denver, Colorado. 



FOR SALE, WELL-BRED SETTERS 

Dogs Trained for Shooting. 
Young Dogs Suitable for Training. 

WRITE FOR PRICES 

THE RIVER LAWN KENNELS 

Grand Island Erie Co., New York 

Member of The Game Guild 



DOGS 



EGGS 



HOUNDS-ALL KINDS. BIG 50 PAGE CATALOGUE 
100. ROOKWOOD KENNELS, Lexington, Kentucky. 

THE BLUE GRASS FARM KENNELS, of Berry, Ky., 
offer for sale setters and pointers, fox and cat hounds, 
wolf and deer hounds. Coon and opossum hounds, var,- 
mint and rabbit hounds, bear and lion hounds, also Aire- 
dale terriers. All dogs shipped on trial, purchaser to 
judge the quality, satisfaction guaranteed or money re- 
funded. Sixty page, highly illustrated, instructive and 
interesting catalogue for ten cents in stamps or coin. 

AIREDALE TERRIERS. The genuine one-man dog. 
Pedigreed, registered pups. Males $25.00. Females, 
$15.00. Guaranteed Satisfactory. L. E. GALLUP, 220Q 
Ogden, Omaha, Nebraska. 



TWO THOUSAND PHEASANT EGGS FOR SALE. 
Pure Chinese, $3.50 per dozen. Ringnecks, Golden, 
Silver and Mallard Duck, 83.00 per dozen. 120.00 per 
hundred. CLASSIC LAKE WILD FOWL FARM, 
Manzanita, Oregon. 4t 

RINGNECK PHEASANT EGGS FOR SALE. $25.00 

per 100 Golden Pheasant Eggs, 60c. each. Day old 

Pheasants, 60c. each. Booking orders now. Mrs. EDGAR 

TIETON.Suffern, N. Y. 51 

STOCK AND EGGS OF RINGNECKS, LADY 
Amherst, Golden and Silver Pheasants. Wild strain 
Mallards. Japanese Silkies, Buff Cochin Bantams. 
" Ringlet " Barred Plymouth Rock Chickens Peafowl. 
MRS. IVER CHR1STENSON, Jamestown, Kansas. 
No. 1. 6t 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



190 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Breeders' Cards 




WILD TURKEYS 

Pure Bred Wild Turkeys 

Eggs in Season 

MARY WILKIE 

Beaver Dam, Virginia 

Member cf the Game Guild 





PHEASANTS, PIGEONS AND 
EGGS. 
Pheasants, Amherst, Silver, Gold- 
en, Reeves, Mongolian, Swinhoe, 
Versicolor, Ringnecks, Cochin 
Bantams, White King Pigeons. 
Eggs in Season. 

BLUE RIBBON POULTRY AND PHEASANT FARM 

Davenport Neck, Phone 655, New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Member of the Game Guild. 

REGISTERED BLACK FOXES, 
TROUT & HARES. 
Rugged pups, bred on highest 
ranch in America. 1917 Breeding 
Record. 8 litters from 8 females. 
Also Mountain Brook Trout. Milch 
Goats. Belgium and Flemish Hares. 

BORESTONE MOUNTAIN 
FOX RANCH 
Onawa - Maine 
Member of the Game Guild. 

PHEASANT EGGS AND PHEASANTS 

Pheasant eggs for sale up to 
May 15, $25.00 per hundred. 
110 eggs sent for cash with 
order after May 15, $20 per 
110 eggs. Pheasants for Sep- 
tember and October delivery. 
Write for prices. GEORGE 
BEAL, Levana Game Farm, 
R No. 1, Englishtown, New 
Jersey. 



LIVE GAME, ELK, DEER, WILD 
Turkeys, Quail, Pheasants, 
Ducks, and all other game. Eggs 
in season. See space advertise- 
ment. 

W. J. MACKENSEN.Yardley, Pa. 
Member of the Game Guild. 



'"WiiSM&t 


7r,i,. 


; 


jgMHI 


'-■;• 


m 




QUAIL 

TWO 

SPECIES 



QUAIL 

Bobwhite Quail, Eighteen Dol- 
lars per dozen. Blue or Scaled 
Quail, FifteenDollars per dozen. 
Twenty years experience in 
handling quail. Safe arrival 
guaranteed. PAN AMERICAN 
BIRD CO., Laredo, Texas. 





DARK MALLARD 

Black Duck, Mallard Hybrids 

These ducks are reared on free range 
especially for shooting and for decoys. 
They are strong on the wing. Big 
egg producers under control 
Price $3.50 per pair ; $1 .75 each 

ALBERT F. HOLMES 
8 Bosworth St., Boston, Mass. 

Member of the Game Guild 



BREEDER OF FANCY PHEASANTS 

Eggs in season Amhersts, Silver, 
Golden, Versicolor, Mongolian, 
Reeves, Ringnecks, Manchurian, 
Elliott, Swinhoe, Impeyan, Mela- 
notus, Soemmering. 

GRAY'S 
GOLDEN ^ POULTRY FARM 
Gifford Gray, Orange, New Jersey 

Member of the Game Guild. 



DR. FRANK KENT 

Importer Bob' White Quail 

San Antonio, Texas. 

Book your orders now for early 
Fall and Spring delivery. 
Bank references. • 

Member of the Game Guild. 



SEA CLIFF PHEASANTRY 

We have nearly all, of the rare pheas- 
ants and cranes, also white, Java and 
black shouldered Japanese Peafowl. 
Mandarin ducks. Eggs in Season for 
sale. Write for prices and particu- 
lars. 

BALDWIN PALMER ' 

Villa Serena, Sea Cliff, Long Island, N. Y. 

Member of the Game Guild. 6t 



PHEASANTS 
ENGLISH, RINGNECKS 

Pearl White Guineas and White 

Cochin Bantams 
Baby Pheasants and Eggs in Season 

THE HIRSCH POULTRY YARDS 
45th Place, Lyons, Illinois 



WILD DUCKS 

The practical rearing of wild ducks j 
is fully described in the illustrated ~J 
book. Our Wild Fowland Waders," I 
written by the Editor of the Game :: 
Breeder. Price $2.00 post paid. 

THE GAME CONSERVATION 

SOCIETY, Publishers 

150 Nassau St., New York 







In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Gam*.' 



THE GAME BREEDER 



191 





GAME BIRDS 

All American game birds are fully 

described in the illustrated book, 

"Our Feathered Game," written by 

the Editor of the Game Breeder 

Price $2.00 

For sale by 

THE GAME CONSERVATION 

SOCIETY 

150 Nassau St., New York 



GOLDEN, SILVER, AMHERST, 
REEVES and RINGNECK 
PHEASANTS. 
All pure bred, strong healthy birds. 
Must be seen to be appreciated. 
Prices reasonable. Eggsin season. 

THOS. F. CHESEBROUGH 
Northport, Long Island, N. Y. 



WATER FOWL. 

I can supply nearly all species 
of wild water fowl and eggs at 
attractive prices. Mallards, Pin- 
tails, Teal, Canvasbacks, Red 
Heads, Gadwalls, Widgeons, 
Spoonbills, Canada Geese, Snow 
Geese and other wild ducks and 
geese. Write, stating what you 
want. 

GEORGE J. KLEIN, Naturalist 
Ellinwood, Kansas 




Mallard-Pintail 



PHEASANTS AND 

PHEASANT EGGS. 

Chinese Pheasant Eggs, 
$25 per hundred. Chinese 
Pheasants for Fall delivery. 

Mrs. G. H. ROBBINS, 
Route 2, Hood River, Ore. 




CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 

Announcements inserted under this head in small type for 3 ceuts per word. 
If displayed in heavy type, 5 cents per word. No advertisement accepted for less 
than 30 cents. Postage stamps accepted in payment. 



THE GAME 

150 Nassau Street 



BREEDER 

New York City 



EGGS FOR HATCHING -PHEASANTS-ENGLISH 
Ringneck, $35.00 for 160 eggs. English Ringneck, $3.60 
per clutch. Golden", $55.00 for 160 eggs. Golden, $6.00 
per clutch. Cash with order. Satisfaction guaranteed. 
OCCONEECHEE FARM, Poultry and Game Depart- 
ment, Hillsboro, North Cai olina. 8t 

RABBIT AND HARE SOCIETY OF CANADA 

Breeders should write for constitution and by-laws. 

JOHN E. PEARf, Secretary, Hamilton, Ontario. 12t 



LIVE GAME 

AMHERST, REEVES, SILVER AND MONGOLIAN 

Pheasant eags $5. 00 a dozen, two dozen, $9.00. Chinese 
Ringnecks, $3 50 a d>>zen, $25-00 a hundred. Mongolians, 
1*35 00 a hundred "Pheasant Karmirg," illustrated, 50c. 
SIMPSON'S PHEASANT FARM, Corvallis, Oregon. 2! 

WANTED IO BUY PHEASAN1S I WANT 

Silvers. Lady Amherst. Golden and Reeves. 
Quote Prices, Ages, and Quantity. 

Morgan's. Phsntry, 244 ti. 61st St., Los Angeles, Cal. 

YOUNG GOLDEN AND AMHERST PHEASANTS, 

1918 hatch, ready to breed this Spring. Per pair, golden, 

$10.00; Amherst, $12.00. O. L. DAVIS, Mt. Sinai, 

L. 1 , N. Y. 2t 



WILL) TURKEVb- 
in this issue. W 
County, Pa. 



-For prices see display advertisement 
J. MACKENSEN, Yardky, Bucks 



PHEASANTS FOR SALE-RINGNECKS, SILVER, 
Goldens, Mongolians, Formosan, Prince of Wales, Lady 
Amhersts, Reeves, Swinhoes, Melanotus, Versicolor, Man- 
churian Eared. ROBINSON BROS., Aldershot, Ontario. 
Canada. 3t 

PURE BRED WILD WATERFOWL AT FOLLOW 
ing prices: Mallards. $3.75 per pair. Pintails, $3 25 per 
pair. Green Wing Teal, $5.00 per pair. Blue Wir g Teal, 
$3 75 per pair. Also reiheads, Gadwalls, Widgeons, 
Canvasbacks, Spoonbills, at reasonable prices, for oropa. 
gating and scientific purposes. GEORGE J. KLEIN. 
Ellinwood, Kansas. 



FOR SALE — RINGNECK PHEASANTS, MALES 
$3.00, hens $4.00. LULU H. CURRY, Roseville, 111. 

HOYT'S CALIFORNIA PHEASANTRY, PRICE LIST 
FRED D. HOYT, Hayward, California. 



GRAY STAR PHEASANTRY 
Breeder of all kinds of pheasants. Eggs in season. 
Pure brand, strong, healthy birds for sale. G1FFORD 
GRAY, 21 Ward St., Orange, N. J. 



FOR SALE— Pheasants and eggs. Everything in the 
pheasant family. Pamphlet witn order free. BUCK- 
WOOD PHEASANTRIES, Dunneld, Warren Co., New 
Jersey. dot) 

quail, Cartridges, wild fowl, deer and 

other animals. See display advertisement in this issue. 
WM. J. MACKENSEN, Proprietor Pennsylvania Pbeas- 
antry and Game Park. 

CANADA WILD GEESE AND THEIR GOSLINGS— 
A limited number for sale now — the surest way to start 
breeding this species. We are the oldest ana largest 
breeders of Canadas in this country. Black and While 
Swans.Wild Duoks, etc , for sale. WHEALTON WATER 
FOWL FARMS, Chincoteague Island. Va. 

For SALE— PHEASANTS, PEA FOWL, PIGEONS, 
Poultry, Bantams and Pit Games Eggs from the 
above Ntock for sale. Rabbits, Cavies, Squirrels, fur 
bearing animals, etc. I buv, sell and exchange. L L 
KIRKPATRICK, Box 273, Bristol, Tenn. 

WANTED— WHITE PEAFOWL, EITHER SEX 
Pied Peafowl, Soemmerring, Cheer, Hoki and German 
Peacock Pheasants. Ruffed Grouse, and White Squirrels. 
Also Swinhoes; state price and number. R. A. CHILES 
& CO., Mt. Sterling. Ky. 



Pheasants Wanted 



WANTED. ELLIOTT, MIKADO, SATYR, TRAGOPAN 

and Linneated Pheasants. Mature birds only. 

Write A. J. MERLE, Alameda, Cal. qt 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game" 



192 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Notice to Purchasers. 

Purchasers can rely upon advertisers in The Game Breeder. The Game Conservation 
Society has a committee known as the Game Guild, which investigates complaints promptly 
and insists upon fair dealing under a penalty of dismissal from membership and the loss of the 
right to advertise in the magazine. There are very few complaints in a year, for the most 
part due to shipments of eggs. These have been uniformly adjusted to the satisfaction of the 
seller and purchaser. Any member making a complaint should state that in placing his order 
he mentioned the fact that it was due to an advertisement in The Game Breeder. All mem- 
bers of the Society are urged to buy from those who support the publication by advertising 
in it. 



FIVE VARIETIES OF PHEASANTS. WILD DUCKS. 

Wild Geese, Brants. Wild Turkeys and other Game, 

List for stamp. G. H. HARRIS, Ta»lorville, Illinois. 4 t 

FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE— FOR FANCY DUCKS, 
geese or pheasants 15 pair of 1918 hatch Muscovey 
ducks. 15 pair 1918 pit games. Grey's, Spangles, and 
Black Breasted Reds. Genuine pit birds. Ducks $8.00 
per pair, $10.00 per trio. ED. J. MEYER, Meyer Lake 
Stock Farm, Canton. Ohio. 2t 

WILD TURKEYS FOR SALE. LARGE, HARDY 

specimens. Satisfaction guaranteed. LEWIS 

COMPTON, Dias Creek, New Jersey. 2t 

FOR SALE — PURE MONGOLIAN PHEASANTS. 
C. W. SIEGLER, Bangor, Wisconsin. 2 t 

SEVEN MALLARD DRAKES FOR $10.00 or $1.50 
each. JOHN KIEkSCHT, Logan, Iowa. It 

THE BLACK SIBERIAN HARE IS OF ENORMOUS 
size. It grows faster, matures and breeds earlier than 
any other rabbit, but best of all is iis delicious meat and 
beautiful fur. Write for information and prices. 
SIBERIAN FUR FARM, Hamilton, Canada. 6t 

GLENWOOD PHEASANTRIES, HADLYME, CONN. 

Ringneck phaesant eggs for sale. Price $25.00 per 100. 

R. K. McPHAIL. 4 t 



FOODS 



WILD DUCK FOODS 

Wild duck food plants, and seed Wild Celery, Sago 
Pond Weed, Widgeon grass, Red head grass, Chara 
and other kinds. 

There are hundreds of thousands of acres of water 
marshes where these, the best of duck foods, will grow 
and hold the game. Write and learn how to do it. 
WHITE'S GAME PRESERVE, Waterlily, N. C. 
Currituck Sound. 



GAMEKEEPERS 



GAMEKEEPER AT LIBERTY. RELIABLE, WANTS 
position on club preserve or game farm. Experienced 
on game and ornamental birds or animals, gun dogs and 
extermination of vermin. MILTON, in care of Game 
Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York. 6t 

WANTED— GAMEKEEPER. MUST UNDERSTAND 
all duties. Write, H. C. VINCENT, 514 Main St., 
Joplin, Mo. It 

GAMEKEEPER, HEAD, WISHES SITUATION. 
Thoroughly experienced, rearing pheasants and wild 
ducks. Also the trapping of vermin, care and manage- 
ment of dogs, deer, decoys, boats, etc. Apply to W., care 
of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau Street, N. Y. City. It 

HEAD GAMEKEEPER'S SON SEEKS SITUATION 

as gamekeeper. 11 years experience and 11 years good 

references. Understands all duties. Age 25 years. Apply 

DAVID GORDON, Hadlyme, Conn. It 



WANTED — POSITION AS MANAGER ON GAME 
farm or shooting preserve. Long experience raising 
game birds. Understand raising and training shooting 
dogs, and trapping vermin. A S. B., care of Game 
Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York, N. Y. 

WANTED. SITUATION AS GAMEKEEPER. Ex- 
perienced on game rearing and dog training. Married. 
Apply H. care of THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau 
St., New York. 

GAMEKEEPER DESIRES SITUATION, THOR- 

oughly understands all duties, etc. Best references 

from Europe and this country. M. J. F., caie of The 

Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York City. 41 

WANTED SITUATION— A GAMEKEEPER FAMIL- 
iar with pheasant and poultry rearing. I have also had 
experience in general farming and can plan the planting 
for game. BRUCE LANE, care of Game Breeder, 150 
Nassau St., New York. 6t 

WANTED— SITUATION AS GAMEKEEPER. THOR- 

oughly experienced in rearing Pheasants. Wild Turkeys 

and Wild Ducks. Good references. GAMEKEEPER, 

463 East 57th St., N. Y. C. it 



MISCELLANEOUS 



FOR SALE— GAME FARM. TWO HUNDRED AND 
fifty acres. Twenty-eight deer. Fine new log bungalow. 
Fine hunting. A beautilul home. Price $60.00 per 
acre. Owner G. D. GORNS, Purdue, Douglas Co., 
Oregon. 2t 

RINGNECK PHEASANTS, $5.00 A PAIR. GOLDENS, 
$10.00 a pair. Guaranteed strong and in the pinK of con- 
dition for Spring breeding. Order now as I have a limited 
supply of birds. LILLIAN E. GALLUP, 2209 Ogden, 
Omaha, Nebraska. it 

BREEDING STOCK OF PHEASANTS FOR SALE 
— Ringnecks, Silver, Goldens, Mongolians, Formosan, 
Prince of Wales, Lady Amhersts, Reeves, Swinhoes. 
Melanotus, Japanese Versicolors, Manchurian Eared, 
ROBINSON BROS., Aldershot, Ont., Can. 

"THE RANCH BRED FOX," THE BEST BOOK 

published on H ox farming. Tells all about this wonderful 
industry. Price 25c. postpaid. THE BLACK FOX 
MAGAZINE, 15 Whitehall St., New York 

WANTED-PARTYTO TAKE HALF INTEREST IN 

a well established wild fowl farm. Address "OWNER," 

care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. C. it 

WANTED, A SMALL COUNTRY PLACE ON LONG 
Island with a house ol six or eight rooms and land suit- 
able for farming. State acreage, location, price and 
terms. B. J., care Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. 

WANTED TO RENT, WITH PRIVILEGE OF 
purchase, Long Island farm with good buildings. Place 
must have a small pond or stream suitable for ducks. 
GAME PRESERVE, care Editor Game Breeder, 150 
Nassau Street, New York. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 




Quail, Bobwhites and Other Species 

NOW IS THE TIME TO BUY QUAIL FROM 

Mackensen Game Park 

I carry the largest stock in America of live 
game birds, ornamental birds and quadrupeds. 

Also Pheasant Eggs by the 100 &1000 

I am prepared to fill the largest orders for Pheasants 
and Eggs, and for years I have filled practically all of 
the large State orders for both Partridges and Pheasants. 

All Pheasant Eggs Arc from My Own Pens 

Pheasants 

My Pheasant pens hold thousands of 
Pheasants and I am prepared to furnish 
these birds in large numbers to State de- 
partments, individual breeders and preserves. 

Wild Duck 

Mallards, Black Duck, Teal, Wood Duck, Pintails and other species 

can be supplied in large numbers at at- 
tractive prices. Also Mandarins and all 
other water fowl. 

Now is the Time to Buy Wild Turkey Eggs 

AND 

Wild Turkeys 

I am now the largest breeder and 
dealer in Wild Turkeys and can supply 
these birds in good numbers to State 
Departments and preserve owners. 

I carry the largest stock in America of ornamental birds and animals. Mv ponds now contain nearly 200 b«at 
Royal Swans of England. I have fine lot of the beautiful pink FLAMINGOES and the very large European 
PELICANS. Also STORKS, CRANES. PEAFOWL, fancy GEESE and DUCKS. My pheasant pens contain over 
a thousand Ringneck and fancy PHEASANTS. All stock is kept under practically natural conditions. I have 60 acre* 
of land entirely devoted to ray business. Can also promptly furnish BUFFALOES, DEER, LLAMAS, RABBITS, etc 

Orders booked during summer. 

I have for years filled practically all the large State Orders and have better 

facilities for handling large orders than any other firm. 

Write me before buying elsewhere — It will pay yon to do so. Your visit solicited. 

1 am only 60 miles from New York and 30 miles from Philadelphia. 





WM. J. MACKENSEN 



>apai<ment V. 



YARDLEY, BUCKS COUNTY, PA. 

Member of The Gem* GoOi 




Game Farm or Preserve 



A large tract of land suitable for a game farm or 
preserve is offered for sale at an attractive, price. 

The land is near New York on a good Automobile 
Road and contains a large pond and stream. There 
are some trout and the waters can be made to yield 
large numbers of these fish. The land is suitable for 
deer, upland game and wild ducks. I shall be pleased 
to show this property to anyone wishing to start a 
game farm or preserve. 

The place is within fifty miles of the City and can be 
reached by Automobile in an hour and a half. 

For particulars address, 

===== OWNER : " , .' ' 



Care Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York 



MCZ ERNST MAYR LIBRARY 




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Date Due